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  • Author or Editor: Mark J. Bassett x
  • Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science x
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The inheritance of an induced mutant for spindly branch and male sterility (SBMS) was investigated in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in F2 and backcross populations. The results support the hypothesis that the mutant is controlled by a single recessive gene. Extensive breeding work with SBMS, involving several thousand F2 progeny, produced no recombinant of the types expected if two closely linked genes controlled the character. Therefore, a single pleiotropic gene apparently controls SBMS. Allelism tests demonstrated that SBMS is allelic with sb but not with sb-2 and sb-3. The gene symbol sb ms is proposed for SBMS because it is a new allele at sb, with the order of dominance being Sb > sb > sb ms . Various ways to exploit the new mutant for marked male sterility are discussed.

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Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seedcoats can have partly colored patterns such as the new two-points pattern, which has an unknown genotype. The gene t cf (derived from PI 507984) expresses partly colored seedcoat pattern with colored flowers. A genetic tester stock t cf two-points BC3 5-593 was derived from PI 507984 by backcrossing to the recurrent parent, Florida dry bean breeding line 5-593, which has black self-colored seeds and purple flowers due to the genotype T P V. A series of test crosses were made between t cf two-points BC3 5-593 and three genetic tester stocks: t z j ers white BC3 5-593, t z bip bipunctata BC3 5-593, and t z virgarcus BC3 5-593. All three test crosses were studied in F1 and F2 populations, and the latter test cross in F3 progenies derived from 80 randomly selected F2 plants. The two-points pattern was never observed with white flower plants expressed by t/t, supporting the hypothesis that tcf is necessary for two-points expression. The complete genotype for two-points was found to be t cf z j ers. The t cf gene expresses more extensive colored zones in partly colored seedcoats than t. For example, t cf z J expresses self-colored seedcoats, whereas t cf/t z J expresses white ends pattern and t z J expresses virgarcus. Similarly, the t cf z j ers genotype expresses two-points pattern, whereas t z j ers expresses white seedcoat; and t cf/-z J/j ers expresses PI type pattern, whereas t z J/j ers expresses weak virgarcus pattern.

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The inheritance of intensified anthocyanin expression (IAE) in a syndrome of plant organs of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) was investigated. A selection from accession line G07262, having white flowers with blue veins on the wing petals and a long, white micropyle stripe on black seedcoats, was used as the source of IAE syndrome. G07262 was crossed with three genetic tester stocks based on Florida dry bean line 5-593, which has the flower and seedcoat genotype T P [C r] Z J G B V Rk. The tester stocks were 5-593 (black seed and bishops violet flowers), t z bip bipunctata BC1 5-593 (a partly colored seedcoat), and v BC2 5-593 (mineral brown seedcoat and white flowers). Analysis of the F1 and F2 data from the test cross G07262 × t z bip bipunctata BC1 5-593 demonstrated that 1) G07262 has genotype t p mic V; 2) genotype t/t prevents expression of IAE syndrome by a dominant gene (Prp i -2) carried cryptically by G07262, i.e., T/-is required for expression of the gene; and 3) Prp i -2 may (preliminary data) express blue veins on white flowers with t V. From the cross with v BC2 5-593, an F4 selection for white flowers with red banner back and mineral brown seedcoats (due to v) was made. When the F4 selection was crossed with 5-593, analysis of the F2 progeny demonstrated that G07262 carries a dominant gene for IAE syndrome, which expresses with V/- but not with v/v. From the test cross 5-593 × G07262, a series of additional cycles of selection and test crosses (including the dark red kidney tester c u b v rk d BC1 5-593) were made, and two new two-colored seedcoat patterns were developed that have never been previously reported. In a test cross with one of them, F2 data demonstrated that the dominant gene for IAE syndrome from G07262 is independent of the C locus, and the gene symbol Prp i -2 is proposed for this IAE syndrome gene to distinguish it from the previously reported IAE syndrome gene [c u Prp i]. A gene symbol reconciliation was made for all previous work with inheritance of IAE syndrome and purple pod genes without the syndrome.

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The P locus in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) can express complete absence of color (white) in seedcoats and flowers with p (with B V) or a pale grayish white seedcoat and nearly white flower with p gri, but P has never been considered a seedcoat pattern locus. Genes controlling seedcoat colors and patterns have been backcrossed into the recurrent parent 5-593 with black seedcoats and violet flowers. The cross, p BC3 5-593 × t stp mic BC3 5-593 (black seeds with a long white micropyle stripe and fibula arcs), failed to show evidence of genetic complementation in either F1 or F2 progeny, leading to the hypothesis that P and Stp are allelic. Five cross combinations between two recessive P alleles (p BC3 5-593 and p gri BC3 5-593) and three recessive alleles at the stippled seedcoat gene Stp (stp BC3 5-593, stp hbw BC3 5-593, and stp mic BC3 5-593) expressed no genetic complementation in seedcoats and flowers of F1 progeny and confirmed the allelism hypothesis. New gene symbols are proposed for the recessive alleles at Stp, viz., p stp for stp, p hbw for stp hbw and p mic for stp mic. The dominance order at P is P > p mic > p hbw > p stp > p gri > p. Crosses were made between t self-colored BC3 5-593 and three other parents—p stp BC3 5-593, p hbw BC3 5-593, and p mic BC3 5-593—to explore interactions between the pattern genes T and P; and segregation for seedcoat patterns in F2 was discussed. The hypothesis was proposed that the T locus regulates expression at P, or the biosynthetic step regulated by P.

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The genetics of the vermilion flower color (more orange than scarlet or salmon red) of Phaseolus coccineus L. is largely unknown, but the gene Sal for salmon red is the gene essential for its expression. Lamprecht line M0169 (PI 527868) expresses salmon red flowers with vein pattern on the wing petals and black seedcoats. M0169 (Sal Am and an unknown gene that inhibits the scarlet flower color expression of Am) was crossed with v BC3 5-593 (sal am and no inhibitor gene, expressing white flowers and mineral brown seedcoats). Line 5-593 is a Florida dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) line used as the recurrent parent for development of genetic stocks. The F2 from Sal Am V wf BC1 5-593 (scarlet flowers, black seedcoats) × v BC3 5-593 (white flowers, mineral brown seedcoats) supported the hypothesis that a partly dominant gene Am changes salmon red to scarlet flower color and that Am has no expression with sal. The F3 progeny test of 27 random F2 parents from the above cross supported the hypothesis of a single partly dominant factor (Am) with no expression without Sal, where only Sal/Sal Am/Am completely eliminates the flower vein pattern (VP) of Sal. F4 progeny tests of 29 random F3 parents derived from a F2 selection with Sal/Sal Am/am V wf/v supported the hypothesis that Am is linked to V (cM = 9.4 ± 1.93) and the hypothesis that Am is linked with a dominant gene (tentative symbol Oxb) that (with Sal v) changes seedcoat color from mineral brown with red haze to oxblood red. Another F4 progeny test of seven selected F3 parents with Sal/Sal Am/am v/v and oxblood seedcoat color supported the hypothesis that the Oxb gene (linked with Am and derived from M0169) with Sal v expresses oxblood seedcoat color. The gene symbol Am is proposed for the gene from M0169 that with Sal v expresses two pleiotropic effects: changes salmon red to scarlet flower color and eliminates the VP of salmon red. The interaction of Sal with Am for flower color and VP expression is discussed for all gene combinations.

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The inheritance of corona and hilum ring color of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) was investigated in the reciprocal cross `Wagenaar' (a Canario market class dry bean) × `Mayocoba' (Mayocoba market class dry bean), where both parents were known to have seedcoat color genotype P [C r] gy J g b v lae Rk. `Wagenaar' has greenish yellow (GY) seedcoat (due to gy) except for purple (dark) corona (due to v lae) and reddish brown hilum ring (due to J), whereas `Mayocoba' has an entirely GY seedcoat. Seeds produced on the F1 progeny plants had GY corona and reddish brown hilum ring. The F2 segregated for three phenotypic classes, the two parental classes and the F1 class, but the segregation did not fit a 1:2:1 segregation ratio due to disturbed segregation. F3 progeny tests of 35 randomly selected F2 parents demonstrated that the two parental classes were true breeding and the F1 class segregated again (as in the F2) for the same three phenotypic classes. In spite of variable expressivity of GY color and disturbed segregation, the data support a single gene hypothesis, for which the tentative symbol Chr is proposed. Chr is dominant for changing purple corona to GY, but recessive for changing reddish brown hilum ring to GY. Thus, only one gene, Chr, controls the difference in seedcoat color between the market classes Canario and Mayocoba. An allelism test between Chr and Z (hilum ring color factor) is needed before a formal proposal for Chr can be made.

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An inheritance study was conducted with genetic stocks constructed in the genetic background of the recurrent parent 5-593, a Florida dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) breeding line with black seeds and purple flowers and genotype P T Z l +. The genetic stocks, t ers ers-2 BC3 5-593 (pure white seeds), t virgarcus BC3 5-593, and t BC2 5-593 self-colored were constructed by backcrossing selected recessive alleles for partly colored seedcoats into 5-593. The cross t ers ers-2 BC3 5-593 × t BC2 5-593 self-colored was studied in F1, F2, and F3. The observed data supported the hypothesis that ers is a synonym for z and that ers-2 is a synonym for a new allele (l ers) at the L locus. The cross t ers ers-2 BC3 5-593 × t virgarcus BC3 5-593 was studied in F1 and F2 progeny, and the results confirmed the hypothesis of allelism between ers and z. `Thuringia' (pure white seedcoats) with genotype P t z L was crossed with t ers ers-2 BC3 5-593, t virgarcus BC3 5-593 and t BC2 5-593 self-colored. The cross `Thuringia' (P t z L) × t ers ers-2 BC3 5-593 was studied in F1 and F2 and supported the hypothesis that l ers is an allele at L. The results of the other two test crosses are discussed. The gene ers-2 is a new recessive allele at L, for which the new symbol l ers is proposed. Thus, the dominance order at the L locus is L > l + > l ers, where l + is the null allele at L found in 5-593. The l + allele does not restrict the colored area of a partly colored seedcoat and is hypothetically the wild-type allele at L.

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The red common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seedcoat colors produced by the dominant gene R and the dark red kidney gene rk d are very similar, making it difficult for breeders of red bean varieties to know which genotype is in their materials. A protocol employing test crosses with genetic stocks having known genotypes for seedcoat colors was developed to identify genotypes with either of two very similar dark red seedcoat colors: garnet brown controlled by rk d and oxblood controlled by R. Twenty bean varieties and breeding lines were test crossed with genetic tester stocks c u BC3 5-593 and b v BC3 5-593, and four of the varieties were test crossed with [? R] b v BC3 5-593. Analysis of the seedcoat colors and patterns in the F1 progenies from the test crosses demonstrated that unambiguous identification of the genotypes of the two dark red colors could be achieved using the c u BC3 5-593 and b v BC3 5-593 testers. The dark red color (garnet brown) of the Small Red market class materials was demonstrated to be produced by rk d, and the dark red color (oxblood) of `Jacobs Cattle' was demonstrated to be produced by R. A Light Red Kidney market class stock was derived from `Redkloud' and used in two crosses: c u b v rk BC1 5-593 × b v BC3 5-593 and c u b v rk BC1 5-593 × c u BC3 5-593. Classification of the F2 progenies demonstrated that the c u gene does not entirely prevent rk red color from being modified by V. The interactions of rk, rk d, and R with C, c u, G, B, and V are discussed, and previous literature concerning those interactions is critically reviewed.

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Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) plant introduction 527829 (formerly Lamprecht M0048) has dark seal-brown (DSB) seedcoats and pink flowers. An investigation was conducted to determine the genotype of DSB seedcoat color. M0048 was crossed with Florida breeding line 5-593, which has genotype P [C r] D J G B V Rk. A series of crosses involving M0048, 5-593, and three genetic tester stocks (v BC2 5-593, c u BC2 5-593, and b v BC2 5-593) led to determination of the genotype. Data analysis indicated that M0048 has the genotype P [? R] J G B v lae, where DSB color is produced by the interaction of R with B. Crosses between [? R] and testers with [C r] always produced seedcoat mottling in F1, except where V masks the effect. The cross [? R] B v (DSB) × c u BC2 5-593 (cartridge buff seedcoat) produced marbled seedcoats (black/cartridge buff) with genotype [? R]/[c u ?] B V. No way was found to determine whether the mottled or marbled seedcoat patterns were controlled at C or R; hence, the allelic ambiguity is indicated with a question mark. Illustrations are provided showing the difference between seedcoat mottling (a highly variable low-contrast patterning) and seedcoat marbling (a less variable high-contrast patterning, usually with cartridge buff as the background color). The development of a new genetic tester stock, [? R] b v BC3 5-593, was described, where [? R] b v gives unpatterned dominant red seedcoat color.

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The inheritance of novel flower and seedcoat patterns was studied in three parental materials: PI 390775 and `Springwater Half Runner' (SHR), which have patterned flower and seedcoat colors, and 5-593, a Florida dry bean breeding line with unpatterned purple flowers and seeds. Using crosses between 5-593 and the other two parents, an analysis of F1, F2, backcross F2, and backcross F3 data demonstrated that a single recessive allele in each of the patterned parents controlled flower and seedcoat pattern. Genetic tester stocks were used to demonstrate that the recessive gene for patterning in PI 390775 was nonallelic with C, T, and Mar, the three genes previously known to control seedcoat pattern in common bean. An allelism test between the recessive pattern genes from PI 390775 and SHR demonstrated that they were allelic and that the gene from SHR was dominant. The gene symbols stp (for the gene from PI 390775) and stp hbw (for the dominant gene from SHR) are proposed, where stp stands for stippled seedcoat pattern and the superscript letters hbw stand for half banner white.

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