Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for

  • Author or Editor: Harry G. Ponder x
  • User-accessible content x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

J. David Williams, D. Joseph Eakes and Harry G. Ponder

Strong academic abilities and practical work experience are important to employers of horticulture graduates. In greatest demand are students with competent personal and leadership abilities and technical skills. Increased class size and increased university core curriculum requirements hinder our capacity to develop these added skills within our curriculum. However, through extracurricular offerings we can offer students ways to develop skills that are not fully expressed in the academic arena. Student interaction in the traditional horticulture club requires practicing interpersonal relation and often conflict resolution skills. Students learn to work as a team to accomplish goals that they have set for themselves as a group. The Associate¥ Landscape Contractors of America (ALCA) Student Career Days experience offers a highly effective means for reinforcing cognitive skills gained in the classroom and laboratory, as well as supplementing academic learning opportunities with technical activities beyond those offered in the curriculum.

Free access

Patricia R. Knight, D. Joseph Eakes, Charles H. Gilliam and Harry G. Ponder

Seed geranium (Pelargonium × hortorum Bailey `Scarlet Elite') were grown in subirrigation troughs in 10-cm pots from 25 June to 3 August 1993. Production medium was a 1 pine bark:3 peat moss:1 perlite (v:v:v) mixture. Plants were irrigated using fresh or recycled solutions and fertilized using Peter's Geranium Special 15N-6.5P-12.5K or Osmocote 14N-6.1P-11.6K. Controlled release fertilizer produced greater shoot dry weights and foliar color ratings than plants receiving water soluble fertilizer. Plants receiving a controlled release fertilizer had lower shoot N concentrations than plants receiving water soluble fertilizer. Recycled irrigation solutions reduced plant quality regardless of method of fertilization.

Free access

D. Thayne Montague, D. Joseph Eakes, Charles H. Gilliam, Kenneth M. Tilt and Harry G. Ponder

This study was conducted to determine the influence of production methods on the growth of container grown flowering dogwood (Cornus florida). The production practices were: full sun, 40% white shade cloth, 40% black shade cloth, and pot-in-pot. The cultivars studied were: cv. `Welch's Junior Miss', cv. `Barton's White', cv. `Weaver's White', and cv. `Welch's Bay Beauty'. The one variety used was pink. Height and caliper data was collected. Plants grown under white shade cloth had the highest overall height and caliper growth, followed by black shade cloth, full sun, and the pot-in-pot production method. The cultivar `Weaver's White' had the highest overall height and caliper growth and the variety pink had the least, regardless of treatment. The remaining cultivars had similar growth regardless of treatment.

Full access

Jeff L. Sibley, D. Joseph Eakes, J. David Williams and Harry G. Ponder

The unprecedented, yet sustained, growth of undergraduate enrollment in the Department of Horticulture at Auburn University can be attributed to many factors, including an increased industry demand for horticulture graduates nationwide. Perhaps the basis of some of Auburn's growth, while appearing to be unique, may be of value in other programs. This paper chronicles the growth of the Auburn Department of Horticulture undergraduate program and highlights some of the traditional teaching methods employed within the department as well as some unique methods that contribute to the program. The paper offers ideas and practices that may be beneficial to other horticulture programs and may encourage teaching faculty at other institutions to publish similar departmental profiles that may prove beneficial to colleagues.

Free access

Patricia R. Knight, D. Joseph Eakes, Charles H. Gilliam and Harry G. Ponder

Seed geraniums (Pelargonium × hortorum Bailey `Scarlet Elite') were grown in 10-cm pots in a 1 pine bark : 3 peat moss : 1 perlite medium from 18 March until 5 May 1993. Plants received Osmocote 14N-6.1P-12.5K and either conventional overhead (CO), drip (DI), or subirrigation (SI). Subirrigation produced greater shoot and root dry weights than CO or DI. Plants grown using DI produced fewer branches than plants grown using CO or SI. Plants receiving SI reached anthesis before plants receiving CO or DI. Method of irrigation had no influence on total root, soil, or leachate N, but SI did increase total shoot N.

Free access

Jay T. Hudson, Bridget K. Behe, Harry G. Ponder and William E. Barrick

We compared service quality perceptions and expectations for consumers from five traditional garden centers (TGC) and three nontraditional garden center outlets (NTO) in Charlotte, N.C., in 1995. NTO and TGC customers had very similar expectations of service quality from their respective retailers. However, TGC customers perceived that their retailer better met their overall expectations. Service quality gaps, the difference between customer perceptions and expectations, were identified for both types of outlets for four of five service quality dimensions. Both TGC and NTO customers ranked assurance and responsiveness as the most important service quality dimensions. Empathy was more important than reliability to TGC customers. This order was reversed for NTO customers. Both sets of customers ranked tangibles as the least important service quality dimension.