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J.M. Amurrio, A.M. de Ron, and M. Santalla

Twenty sugar pea (Pisum sativum L.) landraces common to northwestern Spain (Pontevedra), and potentially of interest as parental material, were evaluated at two locations and for 2 years to study the diversity among them for plant and pod physical quality traits. The main objective was to identify landraces that could be included in breeding programs. Highly significant differences among landraces were found for most of the pod traits, such as length, width, length/width index, fresh weight, and flowering date. Genotype–environment interactions were demonstrated for only three traits of the 10 investigated. High values for correlation coefficients were mostly found for pod traits, but highly significant ones (i.e., P ≤ 0.01) were found for traits other than for pods. Most of the landraces were variable for qualitative and quantitative traits. PSM-0070, PSM-0113, and PSM-0116 were superior for earliness and pod physical quality, but were heterogenous. PSM-0064, PSM-0066, PSM-0117, and PSM-0118 lacked pod parchment.

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Ana B. Monteagudo, A. Paula Rodiño, Margarita Lema, María De la Fuente, Marta Santalla, Antonio M. De Ron, and Shree P. Singh

Availability of germplasm with high level of resistance is essential for broadening the genetic base and breeding crop cultivars resistant to abiotic and biotic stresses. The objective of this study was to determine reaction of a common bean core collection from the Iberian Peninsula to anthracnose, rust, common and halo blights, bean common mosaic virus (BCMV, a potyvirus) and bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV, a potyvirus) pathogens. Of 43 accessions evaluated, 14 large-seeded Andean type, seven small-seeded Middle American type and seven with intermediate characteristics or recombinant type between the two gene pools had resistant reaction to one or more diseases. Resistance to race 17 or 23 of anthracnose pathogen was present in 17 accessions and four accessions were resistant to both races. Resistance to race 38 or 53 of rust pathogen was shown by 22 accessions and five accessions were resistant to both races. All accessions were susceptible to common bacterial blight and 12 accessions had resistance to halo blight. Ten accessions showed resistance to BCMV, none to BCMNV, and two were variable to both viruses. Accessions such as PHA-0573 (pinto), PHA-0589 (marrow), PHA-0654 (favada pinto), and PHA-0706 (favada) showed resistance to two or more diseases. These accessions may be valuable in breeding Andean bean for enhancing simultaneous utilization of both large seed size and disease resistance.