Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 322 items for :

  • bean breeding x
  • User-accessible content x
Clear All
Free access

Phillip Griffiths*

Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is an aphid-transmitted virus that infects snap bean growing regions in New York State and Wisconsin. The core collection of common bean accessions (Phaseolus vulgaris), the complete collection of scarlet runner bean accessions (Phaseolus coccineus) and snap/dry bean cultivars were screened for resistance to CMV. Although variation in foliar symptom expression was observed, no resistance was observed in 93 snap bean and16 dry bean cultivars tested, and only one of the 406 accessions from the core collection (PI 309881) was symptomless. PI 309881 did not have common bean characteristics, and was later identified as a tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius) accession based on morphology and PCR-RFLP of chloroplast DNA. Screening of 260 P. coccineus accessions was inaccurate when a visual rating of foliar symptoms was used. It was necessary to determine infection using ELISA and test plant screening with grey zuccini. Using this approach it was determined that 80 P. coccineus accessions were susceptible to CMV; however, the remaining accessions provided possible sources for transfer of CMV resistance to snap bean. Crosses of P. coccineus accessions were made to breeding line 5-593 and backcrossed to 5-593 and snap bean cultivar `Hystyle'. PI 309881 was crossed with ICA Pijao in order to develop interspecific hybrids. Populations were developed from the interspecific crosses/backcrosses and evaluated for CMV resistance using ELISA and visual ratings of foliar symptoms.

Free access

B. Scully, R. Provvidenti, D.E. Halseth, and D.H. Wallace

supported by the Depts. of Vegetable Crops, Plant Breeding and Biometry, and Plant Pathology, Cornell Univ., and USAID Title XII Bean/Cowpea CRSP. We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of D. Benscher, J.G. Doss, W.L. Hymes, and L. Montorossa-Teñas. Plant

Free access

B. Scully, R. Provvidenti, D.E. Halseth, and D.H. Wallace

Vegetable Crops, Plant Breeding and Biometry, and Plant Pathology, Cornell, and USAID Title XII Bean/Cowpea CRSP. We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of D. Benscher, J.G. Doss, W.L. Hymes, and Ligia Montorossa-Teñas. We also thank A.W. Saettler for

Free access

Phillip D. Griffiths

The New York State Agricultural Experiment Station announces the release of six dry bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) breeding lines with resistance to white mold [ Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary]. These breeding lines, Cornell 601 (pink

Free access

B. Scully, R. Provvidenti, D.E. Halseth, and D.H. Wallace

Breeding and Biometry, and Plant Pathology, Cornell Univ., and USAID Title XII Bean/Cowpea CRSP. We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of D. Benscher, J.G. Doss, W.L. Hymes, and Ligia Montorossa-Teñas. Plant Breeding and Biometry paper no. 789. The cost

Free access

Phillip D. Griffiths, Eric Sandsted, and Donald Halseth

The New York State Agricultural Experiment Station announces the release of six dry bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) breeding lines with resistance to white mold [ Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary]. These breeding lines, ‘Cornell 607’ dark red

Full access

Charles A. Mullins, R. Allen Straw, J. Rennie Stavely, and Jim Wyatt

`White Half Runner' is a popular green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivar in the southern Appalachian region of the United States. The cultivar is highly susceptible to rust and virus diseases. Nine breeding lines with `White Half Runner' parentage were compared to `White Half Runner' for rust tolerance, yield, and pod quality in 1998 and 1999 field trials at Crossville, Tenn. The BelTenn selections were developed by USDA plant breeders and the UT selections were developed by University of Tennessee plant breeders. Selections `BelTenn-RR-2', `BelTenn 4-12028', `BelTenn 4-12046', `BelTenn 4-12053', `BelTenn 5-2717' and `UT-96-3' were resistant to rust. Only `UT 96-4' had lower yields than `White Half Runner' in 1999. The BelTenn lines had slightly smaller pods, and the UT selections had larger and rougher pods than `White Half Runner'. `BelTenn-RR-2' wasreleased in 1995 as a breeding line with rust resistance and pod quality similar to `White Half Runner'. Further selection of BelTenn-RR-2 by a private seed company led to the naming of a cultivar named `Volunteer White Half Runner'.

Free access

N. Mutlu, D.P. Coyne, S.O. Park, and J.R. Steadman

91 POSTER SESSION 10 (Abstr. 050-084) Genetics/Breeding/Biotechnology Friday, 30 July, 1:00-2:00 p.m.

Free access

D. P. Coyne, J. R. Steadman, D. T. Lindgren, D.S. Nuland, J. S. Beaver, F. Saladin, and E. Arnaud Santana

Disease of beans, particularly common bacterial blight (CBB) (DR, NE), rust (DR, NE), web blight (WB) (DR) and bean golden mosaic virus (BGMV) (DR) are major constraints to bean yields and seed quality. The objectives were to identify resistant (R) germplasm, to conduct genetic studies, to develop R cultivars (DR, NE), to improve research facilities and capabilities (DR), to train personnel and educate graduate students (DR, NE). The expected impact is (1) the improvement of breeding programs, yields and income to farmers and (2) returning specialists will permit improved research in the DR. The most significant advances in research were as follows: (i) BAC-6 dry bean breeding line was found to be R to CBB seed infection, (ii) The reaction to CBB was inherited quantitatively with low NSH estimates, (iii) Rust race nonspecific R was correlated with abaxial leaf pubescence; the latter trait was inherited qualitatively, (iv) R to BGMV and WB were identified and (v) Improved cultivars and breeding lines were developed (DR, NE).

Free access

David W. Davis and Karl J. Sauter

Attention has been given in recent literature to crop breeding for heat tolerance, but, as with certain other physiological traits, such as photosynthetic efficiency, practical gain has lagged. The question remains as to whether heat tolerance can be improved, and, if so, if it can most efficiently be improved by a holistic approach, as in breeding for yield following timely high temperature levels in the field environment, or whether the breeding for heat (and drought) tolerance components in the laboratory would be feasible. At issue is the identification and repeatability of key plant responses, such as cell membrane damage, heat shock protein formation, increased ethylene output and other responses, and the relevance, effectiveness and cost of screening for such traits. Results from our laboratory, and the work of others, will be reviewed.