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R. A. Criley and S. Lekawatana

More than three dozen species of Heliconia have entered the cut flower trade since the expanded interest in bold tropical cut flowers began in the early 1980s. Most were wild-collected originally with little information on their habitats or season of bloom. A natural flowering season for some species can be found in the taxonomic literature, but it may be influenced locally by rainfall and drought periods as well as by photoperiod and therefore not reliable in indicating production periods in Hawaii. Sales records from 1984 through 1990 or several heliconia growers on Oahu reflected not only the quantities produced but also the time and duration of the blooming season. Such information is helpful in coordinating with the flower markets. Heliconia species of commercial interest with strong seasonal flowering periods are noted: angusta, bihai, caribaea, caribaea X bihai, collinsiana, farinosa, lingulata, rostrata, sampaioana, stricta, subulata, wagneriana.

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Marvin P. Pritts and Travis Park

facts and definitions, and understanding principles are the bottom two levels of Bloom’s taxonomy ( Bloom et al., 1956 ), yet are fundamental for communicating concepts within the discipline. Table 2. Proposed learning outcomes for a four

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Ann Marie VanDerZanden

HortTechnology 16 312 317 Berle, D. 2007 Employer preferences in landscape horticulture graduates: Implications for college programs North Amer. Colleges Teachers J. 51 21 25 Bloom, B.S. Engelhart, M.D. Furst, E. Hill, W.H. Krathwohl, D.R. 1956 Taxonomy of

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Feng-yang Yu, Yue-e Xiao, Lin Cheng, Shu-cheng Feng, and Lei-lei Zhang

( Goldblatt and Manning, 2008 ). There are ≈70,000 known Iris cultivars, and more than 1000 new cultivars are produced by selection and hybridization every year ( Hu and Xiao, 2012 ). Few of those cultivars bloom in early spring (late March to mid-April in

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Jason D. Lattier and Ryan N. Contreras

, J.-Y. Zhang, Z.-S. Hong, D.-Y. 2009 A taxonomic revision of the Syringa pubescens complex (Oleaceae) Ann. Mo. Bot. Gard. 96 237 250 Chen, Y. Chen, J.-Y. Liu, Y. Zhao, S.-W. 2012 Anatomical study on seed abortion of Syringa villosa under

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Lisa W. Alexander, Anthony L. Witcher, and Fulya Baysal-Gurel

). Vernal witchhazel is smaller than common witchhazel and is grown as an ornamental in the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Hardiness Zones 3 to 8 (U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2012). It flowers December to March and has fragrant, orange–red flowers

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Blair J. Sampson, Stephen J. Stringer, and Donna A. Marshall

and poricidal anthers ( Brewer and Dobson, 1969 ; Danka et al., 1993 ; Eck, 1986 ; Lang and Danka, 1991 ). These and other floral traits of course will vary as blooms age to give bees access to a flower’s reproductive organs at the most opportune

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Gerry Moore

stabilization. A directory of International Registration Authorities and list of the unassigned woody genera is available from the American Public Gardens Association, 351 Longwood Road, Kennett Square, PA 19348, U.S.A < www.ishs.org/sci/icra.htm >. A database

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Jason D. Lattier and Ryan N. Contreras

no significant differences among the 12 taxa included. The smallest genome size was S. pubescens Rhythm & Bloom ® (1.43 ± 0.01 pg), whereas the largest was in S. pubescens ssp. patula ‘Miss Kim’ (1.54 ± 0.01 pg). Within series Villosae , most

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Mark K. Ehlenfeldt, Joseph Kawash, and James Polashock

flowering. This value essentially described how many plants within the family bloomed. Bloom ratings ranged from 0.2 (17 individuals) for the family of ‘Sweetheart’ × US 1896 (i.e., ≈20% total flowering) to 0.8 (33 individuals) for ‘Cara’s Choice’ × US 1896