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Eugene K. Blythe and Jeff L. Sibley

is preferred as cutting material ( Berry, 1994 ). Auxin treatment has traditionally been recommended and used in commercial propagation for rooting cuttings. Knight et al. (1993) rooted stem cuttings of ‘Dwarf Burford’ holly prepared from dormant

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Eugene K. Blythe and Jeff L. Sibley

) hardiness zones 5b to 8a ( Gilman, 1999 ). Plants are grown primarily for their form and foliage; fruit is rarely produced ( Gilman, 1999 ). Heat can be a limiting factor in nursery production of this crop ( Berry, 1994 ). An auxin treatment is typically

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Catarina P. Carvalho, Alejandra Salvador, Pilar Navarro, Adela Monterde, and Jose M. Martínez-Jávega

); 5 or 10 ppm 2,4-D-amine (Da-5 and Da-10); and 20, 40, or 60 ppm 2,4-DP (DP-20, DP-40, and DP-60). After auxin treatments, fruits were air-dried and then submitted to the degreening treatment in the packinghouse under commercial conditions. The

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Antonio Fernando C. Tombolato, Cleide Azevedo, and Violeta Nagai

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V. Kagan-Zur, D. Yaron-Miron, and Y. Mizrahi

A spontaneous tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) triploid was studied with a view to its commercialization. Fruits induced by auxin contained 50% more DNA and 30% more protein than their diploid counterpart. The fruits were 50% larger than those of the diploid counterpart and were juicy but seedless. All fruit quality characteristics checked (polygalacturonase activity, reducing sugars content, electrical conductivity, pH, titratable acidity, pigment content, and shelf life) were comparable to the diploid except for ethylene evolution rate, which was lower than that of the diploid counterpart, and flavor, which was superior. The line seems suitable for agricultural cultivation.

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Abigail R. Debner, Harlene Hatterman-Valenti, and Fumiomi Takeda

two different plant ages. The quick dip auxin treatments followed traditional standards and consisted of 1000-ppm (0.1%), 3000-ppm (0.3%), 5000-ppm (0.5%), and 8000-ppm (0.8%) liquid solutions of either aqueous potassium salt IBA [K-IBA (Sigma

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Eugene K. Blythe

requirement of an auxin treatment to promote rooting of the cuttings has not been noted. Comparing rooting of softwood and hardwood cuttings of confederate rose during the winter, spring, and monsoon seasons in India, Pandey and Vaish (1990) determined that

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Jenny B. Ryals, Patricia R. Knight, and Eric T. Stafne

that some species could require both IBA and NAA to reach optimal rooting; thus, we selected to use combination auxin treatments in this experiment. The three auxin sources were a control, 500 ppm IBA + 250 ppm NAA (Dip’N Grow; Dip’N Grow, Clackamas, OR

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Ji-Yu Zhang, Zhong-Ren Guo, Rui Zhang, Yong-Rong Li, Lin Cao, You-Wang Liang, and Li-Bin Huang

). Data were recorded after 35 d of planting. Each mean is based on three replicates, each of which consisted of 20 cuttings. The cuttings without any auxins treatment (control) did not develop adventitious roots, although they were planted in root

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Seong Min Woo and Hazel Y. Wetzstein

induction studies were conducted using various types and concentrations of auxin applied either continuously or as pulse treatments. For continuous auxin treatment, shoots were placed on half-strength WPM media supplemented with either IAA (0, 10, 20, or 40