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Terri Woods Starman

One and two foliar spray and single-drench applications of uniconazole were applied to Eustoma grandiflorum (Raf.) Shinn (lisianthus) `Yodel Blue' to determine optimal concentrations for potted plant height control. A single uniconazole spray at 10.0 mg·liter-1 applied 2 weeks after pinching, two uniconazole applications at 5.0 mg·liter -1 applied 2 and 3 weeks after pinching, or a drench at 1.60 mg a.i. per pot applied 2 weeks after pinching gave equally good height control. At these concentrations, uniconazole was similar in its effect on plant height to daminozide foliar sprays at 7500 and 2500 mg·liter-l applied once and twice, respectively. Drenching with uniconazole at 1.60 mg a.i. per pot did not increase days to flower (DTF), whereas foliar spray applications did. Drenching did not reduce flower size, but increased flower number at time of harvest. Chemical names used: α-cyclopropyl-α-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-pyrimidinemethanol (ancymidol); butanedioic acid mono(2,2-dimethylhydrazide) (daminozide);(E)-(S)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-pent-1-ene-3-01 (uniconazole).

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Terri Woods Starman

Single and multiple sprays of uniconazole at 0, 5, 10, or 20 mg·liter-1 were compared with daminozide sprays at 2500 mg·liter-1 applied twice for height control of Dendranthema × grandiflorum (Ramat.) Kitamura (Chrysanthemum × morifolium Ramat.) `Puritan' and `Favor'. A single uniconazole spray at 20 mg·liter-1 applied 2 weeks after pinching or two uniconazole applications at 10 mg·liter-1 applied 2 and 4 weeks after pinching were as effective as daminozide for reducing height. Drenches of uniconazole at 0, 0.025, 0.05, or 0.10 mg a.i./pot were compared with ancymidol drenches at 0.45 mg a.i./pot for controlling height of `Bright Golden Anne'. Although ancymidol was more effective, a 0.10-mg uniconazole drench adequately reduced height.

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Terri Woods Starman

Manually pinched plants of 18 cultivars of Impatiens hybrids (Keintzler New Guinea impatiens) were compared to control plants to determine the effect of apical meristem removal on flowering, growth and branching. Pinching delayed days to anthesis (first flower) of all cultivars, however, further delay in days to marketability (5 flowers open) was dependent upon cultivar. Plant area and fresh and dry weight were not affected by pinching plants of any cultivar. Cultivar influenced response to pinching treatments for plant height and plant width. Secondary branch number was increased by approximately 3 branches for all cultivars when plants were pinched. There were interactions between cultivar and treatment for primary, tertiary, and total branch number. Measured improvements in plant form determined two cultivars, Sylvine and Thecla, should be pinched. Chemically pinching these two cultivars with dikegulac at 780 mg·liter-1 was comparable to manually pinching plants.

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Terri Woods Starman

Manually and chemically pinched plants of 18 cultivars of Impatiens hybrids (Kientzler New Guinea impatiens) were compared to control plants to determine the effect of shoot apex removal on flowering, plant size, and branching characteristics. Either pinching treatment delayed flowering by ≈3 days compared with nonpinched controls. Pinching had no effect on plant height or fresh or dry weight. Plant diameter and form changes due to pinching depended on cultivar. Total branch count was increased by chemical but not manual pinching although both pinching methods affected mode of branching. The 18 cultivars of Kientzler New Guinea impatiens were best grown as 0.4-liter potted plants without the aid of pinching.

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Terri Woods Starman

This study investigated the effects of concentration and application time of uniconazole as a spray for single- or double-pinched ornamental pepper (Capsicum annuum L. `Holiday Cheer'). Concentrations from 5.0 to 15.0 mg·liter-1 gave adequate height control, except that 15.0 mg·liter-1 reduced height excessively when applied 8, but not 10, weeks after sowing. Increasing uniconazole concentration increased red fruit percentage when applied at 10, but not 8, weeks after sowing. These results indicate that the later application was beneficial and may lessen the overdosing problem associated with triazole growth regulators. Chemical name used: (E)-(S)-1-(4-chlrophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-pent-1-ene-3-oll(uniconazole).

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Terri Woods Starman and Shane Abbitt

The objective was to distinguish between cultivars and evaluate genetic relatedness of poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima) using two methods of DNA fingerprinting—DNA Amplification Fingerprinting (DAF) and Arbitrary Signatures from Amplification Profiles (ASAP). Eleven red poinsettia cultivars were studied, including `Celebrate 2', `Darlyne', `Freedom Red', `Lilo', `Nutcracker Red', `Peterstar Red', `Petoy', `Red Sails', `Supjibi', `V-14 Glory', and `V-17 Angelika'. Amplification was with 10 octamer primers. Gels were visually scored for presence or absence of bands. The 10 primers generated 336 bands. The average number of bands (≈1000 bp) per primer was 34 ranging from 19 to 43. Thirty-one percent of bands were polymorphic and distinguished between each cultivar. The number of unique profiles varied from two to nine. Genetic relationships were evaluated by SAHN cluster analysis based on the distance estimator of Jaccard using the NTSYS-pc program (Numerical taxonomy and multivariate analysis system, version 1.8). The resulting dendrogram closely agreed with known pedigree data. ASAP analysis was used to further assess cultivar identification of two cultivars that were genetically and morphologically similar. Markers were found that separated `Nutcracker Red' and `Peterstar Red'. ASAP analysis separated cultivars within the Freedom series that DAF failed to distinguish. Two cultivars in the Freedom series, `Jingle Bells' and `Marble', were characterized from other cultivars in the series with ASAP.

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Terri Woods Starman and Shane Abbitt

The objective was to distinguish between series of cultivars of Pelargonium xhortorum (zonal geranium), Pelargonium hybrids (seed geranium), and Pelargonium peltatum (ivy leaf geranium) using DNA amplification fingerprinting (DAF) demonstrating the utility of DAF for patent protection to prevent infringement of inventor's rights. Leaf tissue of 10 plants of each cultivar of seedling geranium was bulked for DNA extraction, and cutting and ivy geranium cultivars were bulks of five plants of each cultivar. Isolated DNA from different cultivars of a series were bulked together in their respective series. Seedling geranium series included Dynamo, Glamour, Multibloom, Orbit, Pinto, and Ringo 2000. Cutting geranium series included Designer and Showcase. Ivy geraniums were from the Guillou group. Amplification was with one of two octamer primers, followed by reamplifying with one of four different mini hairpin primers. Gels were visually scored for presence or absence of bands. The four primers generated 336 bands. The average number of bands (_1000 bp) per primer was 40. Twenty percent of bands were polymorphic and distinguished between each series of cultivars. Genetic relationships were evaluated by SAHN cluster analysis based on the distance estimator of Dice using the NTSYS-pc program (Numerical taxonomy and multivariate analysis system, version 1.8). Series were grouped according to species. Seedling geraniums were in one large group, the two cutting geraniums were grouped together and the ivy leaf geraniums were a separate branch.

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Terri Woods Starman and Shane Abbitt

Our objective was to distinguish between eight cultivars of two geranium species, Pelargonium ×hortorum L.H. Bailey (cutting and seed geranium) and Pelargonium peltatum (L.) L'Hér. ex Ait. (ivy geranium), and evaluate their genetic relationships using the nucleic acid scanning techniques of DNA amplification fingerprinting (DAF) and/or arbitrary signatures from amplification profiles (ASAP). Cultivars used in the study represented three commercial types: cutting, seed, and ivy geranium. Two seed geranium cultivars from each of the Dynamo and Orbit series were included. Cutting geranium cultivars were `Designer Lilac Chiffon' and `Starburst Red' and the ivy geraniums were `Bernardo Guiber' and `Vinco Guivin'. The ASAP amplification protocol used one of two arbitrary octamer primers, followed by reamplification with one of four different minihairpin primers. ASAP profiles were complex, with 66% of bands being polymorphic and useful in distinguishing between cultivars. Genetic relationships were evaluated by principal coordinate analysis and cluster analysis based on the Jaccard distance estimator. This analysis grouped cultivars by species according to commercial type, i.e., seed geraniums were in one large group, the cutting geraniums were grouped together, and the ivy geraniums were a separate branch.

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Terri Woods Starman and P.T. Gibson

The effectiveness of uniconazole for height control of Hypoestes (Hypoestes phyllostachya Bak. `Pink Splash') was determined, and the persistence of uniconazole with chlormequat and daminozide for limiting stem elongation in a low-light interior environment was compared. Spray and drench applications of uniconazole decreased plant height linearly with increased concentration. Two uniconazole sprays at 5.0 mg·liter -1, 0.05 mg a.i./pot uniconazole drench, or two chlormequat sprays at 2500 mg·liter-1 resulted in equally aesthetic plant size for 0.4-liter pots. Chlormequat was more effective than uniconazole for reducing rate of growth in the postharvest environment. No difference in postproduction rate of growth occurred between two sprays at 5.0 mg·liter-1 and 0.05 or 0.10 mg a.i./pot drench treatments of uniconazole. Chemical names used: 2-chloro -N,N,N- trimethylethanaminium chloride (chlormequat chloride); butanedioic acid mono(2,2-dimethylhydrazide) (daminozide); (E)-(S) -1-(4-chlorophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-pent-l1ene-3-ol (uniconazole).

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Terri Woods Starman and James E. Faust

The objective was to provide options for hanging basket production schedules by varying the number of plants per pot (one to four) and the number of manual pinches per basket (zero to two). Several species were evaluated in Spring 1995 and heat tolerance was assessed throughout the summer. Plugs (82 plugs per flat) were transplanted into 25-cm hanging baskets in a 22/18°C (venting/night temperature set points) glasshouse. Bacopa speciosa `Snowflake', Brachycome iberidifolia `Crystal Falls', Helichrysum bracteatum `Golden Beauty', Scaevola aemula `New Blue Wonder', and Streptocarpella hybrid `Concord Blue' produced quality baskets with three or more plugs per basket and no pinch. Pentas lanceolata `Starburst' and Lysimachia procumbens (Golden Globes) produced quality baskets with fewer than three plants per basket if plants received at least one pinch, however length of growing time was increased. Pentas lanceolata `Starburst', Scaevola aemula `New Blue Wonder', and Streptocarpella hybrid `Concord Blue' proved to be heat tolerant, blooming throughout the summer. Bacopa speciosa `Snowflake', Brachycome iberidifolia `Crystal Falls', and Lysimachia procumbens (Golden Globes) were not heat tolerant, i.e., ceased developing flowers in June and resumed flowering in September. Bidens ferulifolium did not produce an acceptable quality hanging basket under any experimental treatments.