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Michael R. Evans and Leisha Vance

serve to make poultry feather a desirable component for greenhouse substrates. Evans (2004) demonstrated that ground poultry feather fiber could be used to grow several annual bedding plant species successfully when used in peat or bark-based substrates

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Sabahudin Hadrović, Filip Jovanović, Sonja Braunović, Tatjana Ćirković Mitrović, Ljubinko Rakonjac, Mersida Jandrić, and Dina Hadrović

sample per individual (total of 30 samples). The bark and core of the samples were analyzed independently. All samples were oven-dried to constant weight, at 105 °C and ground in a suitable mill. Sample weights of 30 mg were separated for C and N

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Sabahudin Hadrović, Filip Jovanović, Sonja Braunović, Saša Eremija, Zoran Miletić, Snežana Stajić, and Igor Golić

individual, for a total of 25 samples. The bark and core of the samples were analyzed independently. All samples were oven-dried to a constant weight at 105 °C and ground in a suitable mill. Sample weights of 30 mg were separated for C and N determination

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M. Gabriela Buamscha, James E. Altland, Dan M. Sullivan, Donald A. Horneck, and John P.G. McQueen

Container nurseries in Oregon use fresh and aged douglas fir bark (DFB). Although there is no general agreement as to what constitutes fresh, aged, or composted bark, the terms are used frequently in the nursery industry. For clarity, we offer the

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Ryan W. Dickson, Kalyn M. Helms, Brian E. Jackson, Leala M. Machesney, and Jung Ae Lee

results from microbial decomposition of organic matter, particularly when the carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) ratio of the organic material exceeds 30:1 ( Bunt, 1988 ; Nelson, 2011 ). Aged barks, sawdust, hammer-milled pine tree materials, and other wood

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M. Gabriela Buamscha, James E. Altland, Daniel M. Sullivan, and Donald A. Horneck

Container crops in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) are grown primarily in Douglas fir [ Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirbel) Franco] bark (DFB). Similar to pine ( Pinus taeda L.) bark in the southeast U.S., DFB comprises the highest portion of most

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James E. Altland, James C. Locke, and Charles R. Krause

, resulting in less pH drift. Despite the importance of CEC in container nutrition and pH buffering, little has been documented on factors affecting CEC of conventional bark-based substrates. Nursery substrates vary by region of the country. In the

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James E. Altland, James S. Owen Jr., Brian E. Jackson, and Jeb S. Fields

In the eastern United States, nurseries use either loblolly pine ( Pinus taeda L.) or longleaf pine ( Pinus palustris Mill.) bark as the primary organic component in soilless substrates. Pine bark was initially used as a growing substrate in the

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Marianela Ramirez, Marek J. Krasowski, and Judy A. Loo

American beech ( Fagus grandifolia ) trees in the northeastern parts of its range have been devastated by beech bark disease (BBD), an introduced insect–fungus disease complex incited by an initial infestation by the scale insect, Cryptococcus

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Tyler C. Hoskins, James S. Owen Jr., and Alex X. Niemiera

solute transport is warranted to develop a more direct and thorough understanding of water and solute transport in soilless systems. Physical properties of the pine-bark and sand blends commonly used in the mid-Atlantic and southeastern U.S. nursery