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Engin Ertan, Esra Erdal, Gülsüm Alkan, and Burak E. Algül

, enzyme activity and pericarp characteristics, the shelf life of chestnuts is very limited ( Correia et al., 2009 ). Therefore, chestnuts are frozen, cold stored, or dried to extend their storage period. However, the nuts have a high moisture content and

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Ibrahim Demir and Kazim Mavi

Differences in the field emergence of seed lots with high laboratory germination or in germination after storage are referred to as seed vigor ( Dornbos, 1995 ; TeKrony, 2003 ), a concept that comprises various aspects of quality and indicates

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Qingqing Duan, Ye Lin, Wu Jiang, and Danfeng Huang

decrease the quality caused by temperature and light stress. Providing light during storage could extend the storability of seedlings of many horticultural species, even at very low light intensity ( Justus and Kubota, 2010 ; Kubota et al., 2002 ; Park

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Charles F. Forney

extended storage and marketing periods. However, for a variety of known and unknown reasons, successful storage of fresh cranberries has been variable and fruit loss is often excessive. Unlike most fruit, the optimum conditions for the storage of fresh

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Charles F. Forney

High-quality cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) fruit are required to fulfil the growing markets for fresh fruit. Storage losses of fresh cranberries are primarily the result of decay and physiological breakdown. Maximizing quality and storage life of fresh cranberries starts in the field with good cultural practices. Proper fertility, pest management, pruning, and sanitation all contribute to the quality and longevity of the fruit. Mechanical damage in the form of bruising must be minimized during harvesting and postharvest handling, including storage, grading, and packaging. In addition, water-harvested fruit should be removed promptly from the bog water. Following harvest, fruit should be cooled quickly to an optimum storage temperature of between 2 and 5 °C (35.6 and 41.0 °F). The development of improved handling, refined storage conditions, and new postharvest treatments hold promise to extend the storage life of fresh cranberries.

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Sven Verlinden, Silvanda M. Silva, Robert C. Herner, and Randolph M. Beaudry

plants, the storage carbohydrates are primarily fructans, which are located in the roots ( Shiomi, 1993 ). Mobilization in support of spear growth is initiated by hydrolysis of fructans to sucrose and subsequent transport of the sucrose to the above

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W.R. Miller and D.A. Smittle

Abstract

Rabbiteye blueberry [Vaccinium ashei (Reade)] production is increasing rapidly and growers of large plantings are converting rapidly from hand harvesting to machine harvesting. In three tests conducted during 1985, machine-harvested ‘Climax’ and ‘Woodard’ blueberries were softer and had higher moisture loss and decay than handpicked fruit after 1, 2, or 3 weeks of storage at 3°C. For both cultivars, berry firmness remained relatively constant during storage, whereas decay and weight loss increased. Berries of ‘Climax’ were firmer, less acidic, and developed less decay than ‘Woodard’. These results will assist in identifying the best fresh-market berries for export from the United States to Western Europe.

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Jennifer R. DeEll, Clément Vigneault, Frédérique Favre, Timothy J. Rennie, and Shahrokh Khanizadeh

The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of vacuum cooling and temperature on the quality and storage life of mung bean sprouts (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek). Sprouts in micro-perforated bags were either not precooled or vacuum cooled to 9, 6, or 3 °C, and stored for 7 days at 1, 3, or 6 °C. Vacuum-cooled bean sprouts lost more weight than sprouts not precooled, and the weight loss was greater when the sprouts were cooled to lower temperatures. However, the total loss never exceeded 5% and no apparent signs of shrivel were observed. Vacuum cooling resulted in greater product freshness after 4 days of storage, but the effect was nonsignificant after 7 days. Storage temperature had greater influence on bean sprout quality than did cooling temperature, with greater freshness and whiter hypocotyls at the lower temperatures. However, blackening of cotyledons increased as the storage temperature decreased.

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K.N. Al-Redhaiman

Mature 'Barhi' dates (Phoenix dactylifera L.) were stored in air or under controlled atmosphere (CA) storage conditions with 5%, 10%, or 20% carbon dioxide concentrations (balance air) during storage at 0 °C. CA conditions extended date storability by maintaining fruit quality. Fruit quality was maintained for 26 weeks when stored in 20% CO2, 17 weeks in both 5% and 10% CO2, and 7 weeks in air. Treatment with 20% CO2 maintained fruit color, firmness, SSC%, total sugar content, and total tannins. CO2 treatment also reduced degradation of caffeoylshikimic acid (CSA), which is one of the major phenolic compound of date fruit. This study indicates that 'Barhi' dates could be stored under CA conditions in cold storage with good eating quality for 17 to 26 weeks.

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Angelos K. Kanellis, Leonard L. Morris, and Mikal E. Saltveit Jr.

Abstract

Parthenocarpic cucumber fruit (Cucumis sativus L. cv. Deliva) of marketable maturity (10 to 14 days after anthesis) were held at 12.5° or 20°C in reduced O2 levels for 5 or 18 days before transfer to air. Carbon dioxide production at reduced O2 levels was generally less than in air; however, at O2 levels < 0.5%, anaerobic respiration resulted in increased rates of CO2 production. Upon transfer to air after 18 days, all samples from reduced O2 showed increased CO2 production rates that equalled or exceeded that of the air controls. Except at 0.0% and 0.25% O2 levels, ethylene production was increased in reduced O2. After transfer to air, ethylene production increased and the increase was inversely related to the previous O2 level. Ethanol and acetaldehyde production were measureable for fruit held in 1% O2 after 18 days at 12.5° and showed dramatic increases at lower O2 levels. Low-O2 injury (pitting) developed on most fruit held at 0.0% O2 and on many fruit held at 0.25% O2. Only minima! commercial benefits are likely to be realized from storage of 1 to 3 weeks in 0.5% to 2.0% O2 at 12.5°.