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S. Lius, R. Manshardt, D. Gonsalves, M. Fitch, J. Slightom, and J. Sanford

175 ORAL SESSION 51 (Abstr. 360-366) Rose and Tree Fruits (Citrus and Papaya): Breeding and Genetics

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Young-ju Kim and David H. Byrne

175 ORAL SESSION 51 (Abstr. 360-366) Rose and Tree Fruits (Citrus and Papaya): Breeding and Genetics

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Yan Ma and Junyu Chen

175 ORAL SESSION 51 (Abstr. 360-366) Rose and Tree Fruits (Citrus and Papaya): Breeding and Genetics

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Jaroslav Ďurkovič, František Kačík, Miroslava Mamoňová, Monika Kardošová, Roman Longauer, and Jana Krajňáková

-quality plant material identified by tree breeding programs. In addition to elm breeding strategies, in vitro propagation methods may significantly contribute to the efforts of tree improvement through existing germplasm conservation, in vitro selection, and

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Shuang Jiang, Haishan An, Xiaoqing Wang, Chunhui Shi, Jun Luo, and Yuanwen Teng

The genus Pyrus (pears) consists of important fruit trees, and ≈20 primary species are generally accepted by most taxonomists ( Challice and Westwood, 1973 ). Based on their geographic distribution, Pyrus species are divided into oriental and

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Renée S. Arias, Natascha Techen, Timothy A. Rinehart, Richard T. Olsen, Joseph H. Kirkbride Jr, and Brian E. Scheffler

, and cultivars for botanical characterization and ornamental tree breeding programs. Literature Cited Abajian, C. 1994 Sputnik Aug. 2010 < http://espressosoftware.com/sputnik/index.html >. Altschul, S.F. Gish, W. Miller, W. Myers, E.W. Lipman, D.J. 1990

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Qin Yang, Yan Fu, Yalan Liu, Tingting Zhang, Shu Peng, and Jie Deng

provide a theoretical reference for the pollination configuration of the cultivar, increased yield, improvements in internal and external fruit qualities, as well as in the genetics, physiology, and breeding science of fruit trees ( Denney, 1992 ; Liu

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Molly Felts, Renee T. Threlfall, and Margaret L. Worthington

, 2015 ). In the late 19th century, Arkansas had a significant industry growing and processing peaches to diversify farm operations. Thus, when the University of Arkansas Peach Breeding Program (Fruit Research Station, Clarksville, AR) began in the mid

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Ronald S. Revord, Sarah T. Lovell, John M. Capik, Shawn A. Mehlenbacher, and Thomas J. Molnar

as inoculum were collected from infected trees growing in Rutgers University field plots. Disease pressure was also provided by natural spread from adjacent breeding nurseries and experimental plots harboring hundreds of infected plants. In addition

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Ralph Scorza

The genetically available range in tree fruit architecture has not been fully utilized for tree fruit breeding or production. Higher planting densities, new training systems, high coats of pruning, the need to eliminate ladders in the orchard, and mechanized harvesting require a re-evaluation of tree architecture. Dwarf, semidwarf, columnar, and spur-type trees may be more efficient than standard tree forms, especially when combined with specific production systems. Studies of the growth of novel tree types and elucidation of the inheritance of growth habit components may allow breeders to combine canopy growth characteristics to produce trees tailored to evolving production systems.