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Chengyan Yue and Bridget K. Behe

landscape retailing at state and regional levels has been published. At the regional level, Brand and Leonard (2001) studied consumers' preference of plant attributes and choices between independent garden centers and mass merchandisers in New England

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Recommendations Made for Endowment Creation at University-based Public Gardens The University of Delaware Botanic Garden is at a critical turning point in its development toward becoming a nationally recognized university-based public garden. To

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Residential Landscapes Sustainability performance and visual preference of landscape elements in six professionally designed landscapes were evaluated and the results were correlated by Huang and Sherk (p. 318). They observed that highly visually preferred

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Sheri Dorn, Milton G. Newberry III, Ellen M. Bauske, and Svoboda V. Pennisi

general public.” These two preferences rose to the top of a list that included established EMG activities involving demonstration gardens, environmental education, community gardens, classes, workshops, speaking engagements, and other topics. These results

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Jemma L. Hawkins, Kathryn J. Thirlaway, Karianne Backx, and Deborah A. Clayton

may be a particularly beneficial form of physical activity for promoting healthy aging. Recent studies by Park et al. (2008 , 2009) and Sommerfeld et al. (2010) have explored the physiological and psychological health of older adult gardeners

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James A. Gagliardi and Mark H. Brand

gardeners felt that if a species was considered invasive, then all cultivars of that species should be considered invasive ( Kelley et al., 2006 ). CNLA members showed some preference for self-regulation over state mandated bans. When questioned if they were

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Xuan (Jade) Wu, Melinda J. Knuth, Charles R. Hall, and Marco A. Palma

above the single species. These findings are supported by consumer research regarding container garden preferences ( Mason et al., 2008 ), which also showed consumer preferences for multispecies. Baourakis et al. (2000) suggested that consumers value

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Alicia Rihn, Hayk Khachatryan, Benjamin Campbell, Charles Hall, and Bridget Behe

increase profit margins ( Schiffman and Kanuk, 2007 ). However, new product attributes and promotional materials need to align with consumer preferences to be successful. Thus, evaluating consumer preferences toward novel indoor foliage plant attributes is

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Benjamin L. Campbell, Julie H. Campbell, and Joshua P. Berning

perennial ryegrass had a negative utility (2.3 rating decrease). The preference for the sun/shade mix fits with the findings of Ghimire et al. (2016) and Hugie et al. (2012) . For the other attributes (and levels), nursery/greenhouse garden center was the

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Rolston St. Hilaire, Dawn M. VanLeeuwen, and Patrick Torres

indicated preference for parks with irrigated turf, Phoenix residents indicated a stronger preference ( Zube et al., 1986 ). A survey of residents in the New Mexican cities of Albuquerque, Las Cruces, and Santa Fe revealed broad support to decrease grass