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Bruce D. Lampinen, Vasu Udompetaikul, Gregory T. Browne, Samuel G. Metcalf, William L. Stewart, Loreto Contador, Claudia Negrón, and Shrini K. Upadhyaya

with mechanically harvested yield data. Materials and methods Mobile platform description. To measure PAR intercepted by the plant canopy, a utility vehicle (model 610 Mule; Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Tokyo) was fitted with a PAR measurement system

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Khalid F. Almutairi, David R. Bryla, and Bernadine C. Strik

in drier years. Water limitations occurring during fruit development tend to have the most dramatic effect on fruit production of blueberry, readily affecting both yield and fruit quality by reducing the size and weight of the berries ( Bryla et al

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R. L. Lower, James Nienhuis, and C. H. Miller

Abstract

Parents, F1, F2 and backcross generations of a cross between a Cucumis sativus L. gynoecious inbred, GY 14, and a selection of Cucumis sativus var. hardwickii (R.) Alef. were evaluated for several horticultural characteristics. Generation means were significantly different for all characteristics, and were analyzed using an unweighted least squares procedure. An additive-dominance model accounted for most of the variation among generations for fruit weight per plant, lateral number, main stem and mature fruit length, diameter and length/diameter ratio. Additive × additive epistasis was involved in the variation among generations for fruit number per plant. Heterois above the high-parent was observed for fruit weight per plant and the main stem length, dominance was the major contributing factor to variation for these traits. F1 deviation from mid-parent was observed for lateral number.

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Paul E. Blom and Julie M. Tarara

Given the finite resources of juice processors and wineries, and the perishable nature of the crop, accurate estimation of yield in grapes is crucial for optimal scheduling and processing of the harvest. Difficulties associated with yield estimation

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K.R. Sanderson and S.D. MacKinnon

Twelve carrot (Daucus carota) cultivars were evaluated at two sites in 1997 and 13 carrot cultivars were evaluated at one site in 1998 for their potential use as cut and peel carrots. The cultivars were evaluated for total yield, marketable yield and root characteristics. Yields were quite variable with the highest yielding cultivars having the shortest root length. Of the cultivars tested, `Presto' produced high marketable yields, root diameters and root weights, however, it was very short. `Indiana' produced consistent yields and stand with a good root length. `Bolero', `Presto' and Indiana' were the best performing cultivars for cut and peel production in Prince Edward Island, Canada.

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Christopher M. Menzel and Lindsay Smith

Yields of bare-rooted ‘Festival’ strawberry plants in southeastern Queensland, Australia, were best with a planting in mid-March, with lower yields with earlier or later plantings ( Menzel and Smith, 2011 ). In contrast, large plants with crown

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Job Teixeira de Oliveira, Rubens Alves de Oliveira, Fernando França da Cunha, Isabela da Silva Ribeiro, Lucas Allan Almeida Oliveira, and Paulo Eduardo Teodoro

, 2018 ). Water is the factor that most often affects the development, yield, and quality of garlic. Soil water deficiency mainly compromises plant development and bulb yield, whereas excess impairs quality and conservation ( Costa et al., 1993 ). Because

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William B. Thompson, Jonathan R. Schultheis, Sushila Chaudhari, David W. Monks, Katherine M. Jennings, and Garry L. Grabow

percentage of no. 1 grade sweetpotato roots that result in excellent economic return. For improved storage root yield and quality, growers must closely follow recommended growing practices in the production field ( Kemble, 2013 ). However, production

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Robert E. Rouse and Norman P. Maxwell

Abstract

Sixteen-year mean and cumulative yields are reported for nucellar sweet orange [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck] ‘Olinda Valencia’, ‘Campbell Valencia’, ‘Cutter Valencia’, ‘Frost Valencia’; one Texas Agricultural Experiment Station (TAES) nucellar ‘Valencia’ selection, and old-budline ‘Valencia’ on sour orange (C. aurantium L.) rootstock. Yields for individual years were consistent among the highest with ‘Olinda Valencia’ and ‘Campbell Valencia’, and lowest with ‘Frost Valencia’ and old-budline. Cumulative yields were comparable for ‘Olinda Valencia’ and ‘Campbell Valencia’. Tree canopy volumes were greatest for the TAES nucellar selection and smallest for old-budline, which was not significantly different than ‘Frost Valencia’ or ‘Olinda Valencia’. Based on yield per unit of canopy, ‘Olinda Valencia’ had the highest yield efficiency and lowest coefficient of variation among years. Internal fruit quality data (°Brix, acid, °Brix : acid ratio, and percentage juice) did not differ among cultivars.

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Bruno Casamali, Jeffrey G. Williamson, Alisson P. Kovaleski, Steven A. Sargent, and Rebecca L. Darnell

the yield losses that occur with multicaned plants, as well as reduce the need to prune the bushes to fit the harvest machines. Along with the desired characteristics for mechanical harvesting, V. arboreum tolerates high pH (above 6.0) and low