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Mary Hockenberry Meyer, Nancy Neil Hegland, and Peggy Fairbourne

A new gardening curriculum, developed by Texas A&M University, the Junior Master GardenerSM (JMGSM program, has been taught in several locations in formal and informal settings in Minnesota. Two projects are outlined here, one an after-school program offered through a community education program, and the other a traditional elementary school setting. With hands-on activities and leader presentations, students learn horticulture as well as language arts, science, mathematics, and social science and are encouraged to volunteer in a community service project within each unit. Students reported they shared the information with their family and friends; most indicated more of an interest in gardening and horticulture after the classes. Teachers may find the curriculum helpful in developing environmental sensitivity and career interests in horticulture.

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Ann Marie VanDerZanden, Cynthia Haynes, Gail R. Nonnecke, and Robert Martin

Globalization affects many aspects of American society, including higher education. Many institutions of higher education realize the need to help students become global citizens and thus require an international perspectives course as part of their undergraduate curriculum. The goal of this research was to evaluate the Horticulture Travel Course (Hort 496), which includes an international travel component, to determine whether it meets the university and College of Agriculture's expected learning outcomes and competencies in international and multicultural awareness. A 23-question survey instrument consisting of open- and close-ended questions was mailed to 116 former Hort 496 participants. Forty-three percent of the questionnaires were returned and were usable. Survey questions were designed to gather information on student demographics, previous international travel experience, learning outcomes achieved through participation in the pretrip preparatory class and the study abroad experience, and how these experiences influenced career development. Responses indicate that both the pretrip preparatory class and study abroad experience helped participants achieve the course learning outcomes. Furthermore, student presentations and guest speakers, and interacting with locals and planned tours immersed students the most in the pretrip preparatory class and study abroad experience, respectively. A majority of participants observed recognizable differences in agricultural management or production practices between the United States and the country visited. Participants also noted that Hort 496 had a positive affect on their communication skills, interpersonal skills, and personal growth.

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Daniel J. Cantliffe and Stephen R. Kostewicz

For many years, the former Vegetable Crops Department, now the Horticultural Sciences Department, at the University of Florida offered a vegetable crop industries course. This one-credit course is offered each year as a 3- to 5-day field trip into vegetable production areas of Florida in the spring semester during spring break. The intent of the course is to give undergraduate students an extensive on-site evaluation of the application of scientific principles learned in lectures related to Florida's commercial vegetable industry. A new, innovative approach to structuring this course was initiated recently wherein only alumni of the department interacted with the students on all phases of commercial vegetable agriculture in Florida. These alumni had obtained degrees at the BS, MS, or PhD level and represented many professional backgrounds related to producing, handling, and marketing vegetables. Students were exposed to real-life situations and were encouraged to discuss and seek employment opportunities during the farm visitations. Student expenses were offset by donations from the Florida vegetable industry.

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Dennis P. Stimart

The Allen Centennial Gardens are instructional gardens managed by the Department of Horticulture, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Twenty-two garden styles exist on the 2.5-acre (1.0-ha) campus site with a primary focus on herbaceous annual, biennial and perennial ornamental plants. The gardens are used for instruction mostly by the Department of Horticulture and secondly by departments of art, botany, entomology, landscape architecture, plant pathology, and soils. Class work sessions are limited due to the gardens' prominence on campus, high aesthetic standards, space restrictions, and large class sizes. Undergraduate students are the primary source of labor for plant propagation, installation and maintenance; management; and preparation of interpretive literature. Work experience at the gardens assists students with obtaining career advances in ornamental horticulture. Future challenges include initiating greater faculty use of the gardens for instruction and creating innovative ways to use the gardens to enhance instruction.

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Marcia Eames-Sheavly

By examining the ways that societies have raised and prepared their predominant food crops, students can gain insights into horticultural methods and origins of food, and develop an awareness of and appreciation for diverse cultural heritage. An interdisciplinary approach to the subject permits young people to synthesize information form diverse sources and to understand the important historic relationship between humans and plants.

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Michael E. Kane, Nancy L. Philman, and Matthew A. Jenks

Only a few plants are suitable for reliably demonstrating rapid direct and indirect shoot organogenesis in vitro. A laboratory exercise has been developed using internodes of Myriophyllum aquaticum, an amphibious water garden plant. Stock shoot cultures are established and maintained in vitro from nodal explants cultured on agar-solidified medium consisting of half-strength Murashige & Skoog salts (MS) and 30 g·liter-1 sucrose. Students use these cultures as the source of internode explants. Explants are cultured on agar-solidified full-strength MS with 30 g·liter-1 sucrose, 100 mg·liter-1 myo-inositol, and 0.4 mg·liter-1 thiamine·HCL and factorial combinations of 0 to 10 μM 2iP and 0 to 1.0 μM NAA. Adventitious shoot development occurs directly from the explant epidermis within 4 days and is promoted in media supplemented with 2iP alone. Cytokinin-supplemented media amended with NAA induce organogenetic callus formation, but reduce 2iP promotion of direct shoot organogenesis. After 4 weeks, shoot organogenesis on the various media is quantified and can be analyzed statistically. Chemical names used: N-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)-1H-purin-6-amine (2iP); α-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA).

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Robert W. Boufford

Graduates of horticulture curricula are expected to be able to convey technical expertise in a variety of communication and writing activities. To address the need for writing competence, writing-across-the-curriculum concepts are being applied in a variety of horticulture courses. To expand writing skills in a turfgrass management course using a job-related activity, a newsletter project was assigned to students that required the students to write two articles and produce a newsletter publication.

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Michele R. Warmund, Denny S. Schrock, and Doris P. Littrell

106 POSTER SESSION (Abstr. 508–518) Teaching and Extension Methodology

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Larry J. Kuhns and Tracey L. Harpster

106 POSTER SESSION (Abstr. 508–518) Teaching and Extension Methodology

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C. B. McKenney and D. L. Auld

84 WORKSHOP 11 Teaching Horticulture in Changing Times