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Richard T. Olsen, Thomas G. Ranney, and Zenaida Viloria

Poster Session 7—Ornamental Plant Breeding 18 July 2005, 1:15–2:00 p.m. Poster Hall–Ballroom E/F

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Marietta Loehrlein and Sandy Siqueira

Poster Session 7—Ornamental Plant Breeding 18 July 2005, 1:15–2:00 p.m. Poster Hall–Ballroom E/F

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Robert J. Griesbach

Poster Session 7—Ornamental Plant Breeding 18 July 2005, 1:15–2:00 p.m. Poster Hall–Ballroom E/F

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Eric Stafne, Jon Lindstrom, and John Clark

Poster Session 7—Ornamental Plant Breeding 18 July 2005, 1:15–2:00 p.m. Poster Hall–Ballroom E/F

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Keri Jones and Sandra Reed

Poster Session 7—Ornamental Plant Breeding 18 July 2005, 1:15–2:00 p.m. Poster Hall–Ballroom E/F

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Amanda J. Hershberger, Tracie M. Jenkins, and Carol Robacker

encouraged ( Negron-Ortiz, 2012 ). Furthermore, these species are of interest to plant breeders as a result of their ornamental potential. Therefore, for purposes of obtaining variability for plant breeding and to preserve the genetic variability in Spigelia

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Matthew L. Richardson, Catherine J. Westbrook, David G. Hall, Ed Stover, Yong Ping Duan, and Richard F. Lee

of all varieties of Citrus as well as other Rutaceae and some ornamental plants ( Heppner, 1993 ; Jacas et al., 1997 ; Pandey and Pandey, 1964 ). Larvae feed on the epidermal cell layer of developing leaves, producing a serpentine mine ( Belasque

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Whitney D. Phillips, Thomas G. Ranney, Darren H. Touchell, and Thomas A. Eaker

.E. Arumuganathan, K. Kresovich, S. Doyle, J.J. 1992 Nuclear DNA content variation within the Rosaceae Amer. J. Bot. 79 1081 1086 Dirr, M.A. 1998 Manual of woody landscape plants: Their identification, ornamental characteristics, culture, propagation, and uses. 6th

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Ying Chen, Xinlu Chen, Fei Hu, Hua Yang, Li Yue, Robert N. Trigiano, and Zong-Ming (Max) Cheng

Agave species ( Agave L.) are important species in tropical and subtropical ecosystems and are also cultivated as ornamentals. They have been recently recognized as highly promising bioenergy plants because they yield high cellulosic biomass while

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Jason D. Lattier and Ryan N. Contreras

reduced fertility. This may be a detriment in breeding most crops, but could be an avenue for ornamental breeders to recover more compact, longer-blooming, and sterile cultivars. As the aneuploid population matures, plants will be compared for differences