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Paul Skroth, Jim Nienhuis, Geunhwa Jung, and Dermont Coyne

30 POSTER SESSION 4 (Abstr. 460-484) Breeding/Genetics/Molecular Markers

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Soon O. Park, Dermot P. Coyne, and James R. Steadman

Bean rust, caused by Uromyces appendiculatus, is an important disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). The objective was to identify RAPD markers linked to the gene (Ur-6) for specific resistance to rust race 51 using bulked segregant analysis in an F2 segregating population from the common bean cross pinto `Olathe' (resistant to rust) × great northern Nebraska #1 selection 27 (susceptible to rust). A single dominant gene controlling specific resistance to race 51 was hypothesized based on F2 segregation, and then was confirmed in the F3 generation. A good fit to a 3:1 ratio for band presence to band absence for each of three markers was observed in 100 F2 plants. Three RAPD markers were detected in a coupling phase linkage with the Ur-6 gene. Coupling-phase RAPD marker OAB14.600 was the most closely linked to the Ur-6 gene at a distance of 3.5 cM among these markers. No RAPD markers were identified in a repulsion phase linkage with the Ur-6 gene. The RAPD markers linked to the gene for specific rust resistance of Middle American origin detected here, along with other independent rust resistance genes from other germplasm, could be utilized to pyramid multiple genes into a bean cultivar for more durable rust resistance.

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Jan G. Tivang, Neal DeVos, James Nienhuis, and Paul Skroch

Individual heads (capitula) from five discrete artichoke, Cyara scolymus L., populations were evaluated using RAPD markers. One vegetatively-propagated cultivar; Green Globe; two seed-propagated cultivars, Imperial Star and Big Heart XR-1; and two breeding populations were examined. Twenty-seven RAPD primers were scored yielding 2 to 16 polymorphic bands resulting in a total of 178 bands. Our objective was to determine if RAPD markers could be used to distinguish between and within populations. The genetic relationships among populations as well as among individuals within each population were estimated using the ratio of discordant to total bands scored. Data reduction (MDS) provided a plot indicating five clusters corresponding to the five populations. Confirmation of the presence of five discrete clusters was obtained by analysis of variance of the marker frequencies. The genetic diversity index (GDI) was calculated for each populations as the pooled variance of band frequency for each population. The GDI values were highly correlated to the mean genetic distance within each population. The homogeneity of variance for the GDI values associated with each population were compared using the Siegel-Tukey test for homogeneity of spread.

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Tim Rinehart and Sandy Reed

Hydrangea popularity and use in the landscape has expanded rapidly in recent years with the addition of remontant varieties. Most cultivars in production belong to the species Hydrangea macrophylla but H. paniculata, H. arborescens, H. serrata, H. aspera, H. heteromalla, H. integrifolia, H. anomala, H. seemanii, and H. quercifolia are also commercially available. In addition to species diversity there is high intra-species variation, particularly in H. macrophylla, which includes mopheads, lacecaps, French, Japanese, dwarf, and variegated varieties. Relatively little is known about the genetic background or combinability of these plants. DNA sequence data, genome size, RAPD, AFLP, and ISSR markers have been used for taxonomic identification and to estimate diversity within the genus. All of these methods have limited usefulness in a large scale breeding program. We recently established microsatellite markers for Hydrangea and evaluated their utility for estimating species diversity and identifying cultivars within H. macrophylla and H. paniculata. We also verified an inter-specific cross between H. macrophylla and H. paniculata using these markers. Future research includes marker assisted breeding, particularly with respect to remontant flowering traits.

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Margaret R. Pooler, Louise G.H. Riedel, S.E. Bentz, and A.M. Townsend

Controlled pollinations were made between five hemlock (Tsuga) species from eastern North America and Asia, resulting in over 5700 germinating seedlings. A subset of putative hybrid seedlings from each cross was tested for authenticity by various DNA marker systems. The most reliable and useful system for verifying hybrids was amplified fragment-length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Hybridizations between the eastern North American species, T. canadensis [L.] Carriere and T. caroliniana Engelm., and the Asian species, T. chinensis (Franch.) E. Pritz., were used as a model to test the inheritance, reliability, and ease of use of these markers. Using AFLP markers, we were able to verify 58 hybrids between T. caroliniana and T. chinensis, one hybrid between T. caroliniana and T. canadensis, but could find no definitive hybrids between T. canadensis and T. chinensis. Results using other marker systems, including RAPD, SCAR, ITS, and SSR, are also presented.

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Kanta Kobira, Khalid Ibrahim, Elizabeth Jefferey, and John Juvik

Considerable epidemiological evidence exists on the association between consumption of antioxidant-rich vegetables and incidence of chronic diseases, including cancer and cardiovascular disease. Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. sp. italica) florets are relatively abundant sources of antioxidants, and potentially amenable to genetic manipulation to enhance this vegetable's health-promoting properties. This investigation focuses on the identification of chromosomal segments in the nuclear genome of broccoli associated with antioxidant carotenoid and tocopherol variability. A broccoli F2:3 population consisting of 163 families derived from a cross between two parents (VI-158 and BNC) and previously mapped with 62 polymorphic SSR and SRAP marker loci was evaluated for carotenoid and tocopherol concentration in floret tissue over two growing seasons. Significant differences were observed among F2:3 family means for concentrations of lutein (10-fold difference between the lowest and highest family), beta-carotene 17-fold), alpha-tocopherol (8-fold) and gamma-tocopherol (6-fold). On a concentration basis, beta-carotene, lutein, alpha-tocopherol, and gamma-tocopherol were the most abundant antioxidant forms in broccoli. Heritability estimates of primary phytochemicals ranged from 0.35 to 0.38, 0.40, and 0.44 for beta-carotene, alpha-tocopherol, gamma-tocopherol, and lutein, respectively. Composite interval mapping (CIM) identified two quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with carotenoid variability on two linkage groups and five QTL associated with tocopherol variability on four linkage groups. The QTL identified in this study have potential for use in marker-assisted crop improvement programs to develop elite germplasm designed to promote health among the consuming public.

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Martha Dávila, Dermot Coyne, Shree Singh, and Guenhwa Jung

The genes involved in F1 seedling abnormal development and lethality in inter-gene pool crosses have been designated as Dl1 (MesoAmerican=MA) and Dl2 (Andean=A) (Shii et al., 1980, J. Hered. 71:218–222). The different degrees of leaf crippling (C) in segregating populations of crosses was due to the interaction between the Dl1 or Dl2 loci, growing environment, and the lcr allele (Singh and Molina, 1996, J. Hered., In press). The objective was to identify RAPD markers linked to the genes for crippling (lcr) and seedling lethality (Dl) using the bulked segregation analysis procedure for F2 of MA × A crosses. Crosses were made between C lines, FB 10413-24-2, WA 7807-305, and TY 5578-220 and normal (N) parents and tester stocks for Dl1 and Dl2 genes. The F2 FB 10413-24-2 × Carioca segregated 13 N:3C. F3 families segregated 3N:1C. RAPD marker OPB-10 was linked to Lcr at 31.2 cM. F3 families segregated 1N:3C. RAPD marker OPO16 was linked to Dl1 at 27 cM. The F2 WA-7807-305 × Rio Tibagi segregated 3N:1C. RAPD marker OPS-03 was linked to Lcr at 32.6 cM.

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Pan-chi Liou, Fred G. Gmitter Jr., and Gloria A. Moore

Citrus genetic studies and cultivar improvement have been difficult with conventional techniques. Alternative approaches are needed to enhance efficiency of such studies. Our objectives were to characterize the Citrus genome and to initiate development of a linkage map using RFLP and isozyme analysis. Methods of Citrus DNA extraction were developed to allow the isolation of chromosomal DNA of acceptable quality for recombinant' DNA manipulations. A PstI Citrus genomic library was constructed to create DNA clones for the RFLP survey. A rapid, reliable procedure was developed to facilitate screening of the library for useful clones. The methods used and strategy followed minimized contamination with organelle DNA, increased the frequency of single copy clones, and allowed rapid screening of the newly–constructed library. Linkage relationships of 49. markers, including 36 RFLP and 6 isozyme loci, were analyzed and a map comprised of 8 linkage groups was constructed. Insertions or deletions were responsible for at least 30% of the RFLPs identified. A hypothesis of transposon activity in Citrus was proposed based on our observations.

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Frank Cheng, Norman Weeden, and Susan Brown

The ability to pre-screen apple populations for fruit color at an early seedling stage would be advantageous. In progeny of the cross `Rome Beauty' × `White Angel' red/yellow color variation was found to be highly correlated with the genotype at Idh-2, an isozyme locus that was heterozygous in both parents. We postulate that the red/yellow color variation was produced by a single gene linked to I&-2 and also heterozygous in both parents. This population was also screened with over 400 primers to detect randomly amplified polymorphic (RAPD) markers for fruit color. DNA extraction procedures were developed for bark, and DNA was extracted from bark samples and leaves. Red and yellow fruited individuals were examined in bulk. Several markers have been found that are linked to red color. A high density map is being constructed in this region. These markers are being examined in other crosses segregating for fruit color. The application of these markers will be discussed in relation to the inheritance and manipulation of fruit color.

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R.N. Trigiano, K.M. Kaveriappa, S.E. Schlarbaum, M.T. Windham, and W. Witte

DNA amplification fingerprinting (DAF) was Used to characterize both parents (different cultivars) in breeding experiments with Cornus florida. Putative hybrids were fingerprinted and true crosses identified by finding unique male parent products in amplification profiles. Both manual and honey bee mediated pollinations successfully produced hybrid seed. Axillary buds from seedlings were used to initiate proliferating shoot cultures on woody plant medium with 4.5 μm BA. Initiation and development of adventitious roots were dependent on IBA (4.1 μm), sucrose (0–2%), and agar (0.2–0.6%) concentrations. About 40–50% of the microshoots produced roots and were acclimatized to greenhouse conditions. Cultures have been maintained without loss of regeneration potential for over 2 years. Clonal material can be reentered into the breeding program or used to evaluate horticultural characteristics in different environments and locales.