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M. Pilar Bañados, Bernadine C. Strik, David R. Bryla, and Timothy L. Righetti

150N showed symptoms of salt stress (e.g., interveinal chlorosis and marginal leaf necrosis in young developing leaves; Caruso and Ramsdell, 1995 ) in Year 1 with 17% and 55% of the plants dying by Oct. 2002, respectively. Cummings (1978) likewise

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Naveen Kumar, Fnu Kiran, and Ed Etxeberria

, stunting, and twig dieback. Young leaves remained small and had interveinal and veinal chlorosis, and excessive leaf drop. The trees were in evident decline. Root sampling and tissue preparation for SEM. Three replications of root samples were randomly

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W. Garrett Owen

consistent volume of MgSO 4 applied ( Owen, 2019 ). Though leaf tissue Mg concentrations were within the recommended range, symptoms of Mg deficiency such as interveinal chlorosis would be difficult to observed because of the color and venation pattern of

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Jason M. Lilley and Elsa S. Sánchez

in 2014 (6 Oct.) to collect data before vine killing frost occurred. Plants expressing symptoms, including wilted leaves, interveinal chlorosis, or necrosis, were flagged. If symptoms worsened 1 week later and bacterial streaming was observed, they

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Prabin Tamang, Kaori Ando, William M. Wintermantel, and James D. McCreight

) and CYSDV (family Closteroviridae , genus Crinivirus ) since 2006 ( Gonzalez et al., 1992 ; Kuo et al., 2007 ). CYSDV infection produces yellowing and interveinal leaf chlorosis. Symptoms generally occur first in older (basal) leaves and spread

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production and quality of cranberries may be affected by environmental stress. Yellow vine syndrome, interveinal chlorosis moving from older to younger leaves, has been observed in cranberry bogs. The reason for the development of the syndrome is unknown. Our

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Massachusetts Cranberry Station, One State Bog Rd., East Wareham, MA 02538 The production and quality of cranberries may be affected by environmental stress. Yellow vine syndrome, interveinal chlorosis moving from older to younger leaves, has been observed in

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R. Paul Schreiner and Carolyn F. Scagel

square error (RMSE) from linear regression. Leaf symptoms of K deficiency (interveinal chlorosis followed by necrosis) occurred in both 2014 and 2015 in the 0%K treatment only, beginning in midseason in 2014 and as early as fruit set in 2015. Leaf

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Bruce W. Wood, Lenny Wells, and Frank Funderburke

is typically an irregular interveinal chlorosis of the oldest leaflets of shoots; however, there is anecdotal evidence that in the case of Desirable cultivar, an important cultivar suspected of possessing a relatively high K requirement, excessive

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Deron Caplan, Mike Dixon, and Youbin Zheng

cases, both younger and older leaves began to show interveinal purpling, leading to chlorosis and necrosis. There was also visible leaf purpling in treatments of U2, at the rates that supplied 223 and 286 mg N/L; most of these plants had entirely purple