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Amy Fulcher, Juang-Horng (JC) Chong, Sarah A. White, Joseph C. Neal, Jean L. Williams-Woodward, Craig R. Adkins, S. Kristine Braman, Matthew R. Chappell, Jeffrey F. Derr, Winston C. Dunwell, Steven D. Frank, Stanton A. Gill, Frank A. Hale, William E. Klingeman, Anthony V. LeBude, Karen Rane, and Alan S. Windham

). Apps may soon become a standard business tool within agriculture as they have in other business sectors ( Bradley, 2010 ). Apps offer several advantages over traditional forms of delivering Cooperative Extension Service information ( Drill, 2012

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Karl E. Foord, David C. Zlesak, Tom G. Bartholomay, and Mary H. Meyer

audience, mission, and method of financing the newsletter, different newsletter production and access models exist. Developed in 1999 and originally delivered by hard copies to garden centers for public distribution, the University of Minnesota Extension

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Tatiana Borisova and Pilar Useche

implemented by regional and local agencies, Cooperative Extension Services, and other organizations to encourage more efficient irrigation water use and residential water conservation; however, limited information exists about the effectiveness of such

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Amy Fulcher, Sarah A. White, Juang-Horng (JC) Chong, Joseph C. Neal, Jean L. Williams-Woodward, Craig R. Adkins, S. Kristine Braman, Matthew R. Chappell, Jeffrey F. Derr, Winston C. Dunwell, Steven D. Frank, Stanton A. Gill, Frank A. Hale, William E. Klingeman, Anthony V. LeBude, Karen Rane, and Alan S. Windham

As the use of smartphones by farmers increases ( Walter et al., 2011 ), apps are becoming a mainstream method for extension professionals to provide information to agriculture clientele. Many agricultural producers, Cooperative Extension Service

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Tiffany L. Maughan, Kynda R. Curtis, Brent L. Black, and Daniel T. Drost

, combined with year-round consumer demand, create the need for extended fruit production into the off season. The climatic conditions in the Intermountain West require the use of season extension technologies so that growers may successfully supply markets

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William J. Lamont Jr., Michael D. Orzolek, E. Jay Holcomb, Robert M. Crassweller, Kathy Demchak, Eric Burkhart, Lisa White, and Bruce Dye

The Center for Plasticulture's High Tunnel Research and Education Facility was established at Pennsylvania State University in 1999. Since its inception, applied research has been conducted at this facility by a team of researchers and extension specialists on the development of a new high tunnel design. The development of crop production recommendations for vegetables, small fruits, tree fruits and cut flowers grown in high tunnels has been a priority. To complement the applied research program, an aggressive extension education program was developed to extend information on the technology of high tunnels to county extension personnel, growers, industry representatives, students, master gardeners and the general public. The extension programming effort consisting of demonstration high tunnels, field days, tours, in-service training, publications and presentations made at winter meetings will be discussed in the report below.

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Michele Bakacs, Amy Rowe, William T. Hlubik, and Jan Zientek

University began to assess the industry need for a formal extension program on organic land care. A 14-question survey was conducted at industry training events attended by landscapers as well as public employees. Landscapers were asked if they were

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Mike Murray

74 ORAL SESSION 14 (Abstr. 520–527) Cross-commodity/No commodity: Human Issues/Extension/Technology Transfer Tuesday, 25 July, 8:00–10:00 a.m

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George J. Hochmuth and Donald N. Maynard

Delivery of modern extension programs involves considerable expenses that are becoming scarce from traditional sources. Successful extension educational programs will need to find additional revenue sources to fund educational materials, speaker costs, conferences, and other needs. It is important to become as financially efficient as possible and sometimes this means consolidating some programs and eliminating others. Charging fees to attendees is one means of covering costs of delivering programs. The University of Florida is partnering with the agriculture industry and trade journal publishers to provide resources and publishing for educational programs and materials.

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Robert B. Gravani, Anusuya Rangarajan, and Elizabeth Bihn

44 POSTER SESSION 7 (Abstr. 381–397) Extension/Technology Transfer/Public Education Monday, 24 July, 1:00–2:00 p.m.