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Mark J. Bassett

Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seedcoats can have partly colored patterns such as the new two-points pattern, which has an unknown genotype. The gene t cf (derived from PI 507984) expresses partly colored seedcoat pattern with colored flowers. A genetic tester stock t cf two-points BC3 5-593 was derived from PI 507984 by backcrossing to the recurrent parent, Florida dry bean breeding line 5-593, which has black self-colored seeds and purple flowers due to the genotype T P V. A series of test crosses were made between t cf two-points BC3 5-593 and three genetic tester stocks: t z j ers white BC3 5-593, t z bip bipunctata BC3 5-593, and t z virgarcus BC3 5-593. All three test crosses were studied in F1 and F2 populations, and the latter test cross in F3 progenies derived from 80 randomly selected F2 plants. The two-points pattern was never observed with white flower plants expressed by t/t, supporting the hypothesis that tcf is necessary for two-points expression. The complete genotype for two-points was found to be t cf z j ers. The t cf gene expresses more extensive colored zones in partly colored seedcoats than t. For example, t cf z J expresses self-colored seedcoats, whereas t cf/t z J expresses white ends pattern and t z J expresses virgarcus. Similarly, the t cf z j ers genotype expresses two-points pattern, whereas t z j ers expresses white seedcoat; and t cf/-z J/j ers expresses PI type pattern, whereas t z J/j ers expresses weak virgarcus pattern.

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Mark J. Bassett

Studying the genetics of seedcoat color in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in F2 progenies is very difficult because of complex epistatic interactions, and the analysis is complicated further by multiple allelism, especially at the C locus. An alternative approach is to study seedcoat genetics by analyzing the F1 progeny of test crosses between a variety with unknown seedcoat genotype and genetic tester stocks with known genotypes. Twenty varieties, 18 with known genotype at C, were test crossed with the genetic tester stock c u BC3 5-593, where 5-593 is a recurrent parent with seedcoat genotype P [C r] D J G B V Rk. The resulting F1 progenies were classified into seven phenotypic classes and discussed. The crosses g B v BC3 5-593 × c u BC3 5-593 and c u BC3 5-593 × v BC3 5-593 were made and the F2 progeny classified for flower color and seedcoat color and pattern. No tiny cartridge buff flecks were observed in the segregants with C/c u v/v, whereas C/c u V/- always showed such flecks. The contrasting seedcoat color expression at C in different environmental conditions is discussed.

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Mohamed F. Mohamed, Dermot P. Coyne, and Paul E. Read

conducted under Title XII Bean/Cowpea CRSP Project, Univ. of Nebraska, Univ. of Puerto Rico, and Dominican Republic under AID contract no. DNA-1310-G-SS-6008-00 and also under Project no. 20-036. M.F.M. thanks Ellen Paparozzi and Liz Conley for their

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Soon O. Park, Dermot P. Coyne, Geunhwa Jung, Paul W. Skroch, E. Arnaud-Santana, and James R. Steadman

Our objective was to identify QTL for seed weight (SW), length, and height segregating in a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population from the cross `PC-50' (Larger SW) × XAN-159 (Smaller SW). The parents and RILs were grown in two separate greenhouse experiments in Nebraska, and in field plots in the Dominican Republic and Wisconsin. Data analysis was done for individual environments separately and on the mean over all environments. A simple linear regression analysis of all data indicated that most QTL appeared to be detected in the mean environment. Composite interval mapping (CIM) analysis was then applied to the means over environments. Eight QTL for SW were detected on common bean linkage groups (LGs) 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8. All eight markers associated with these QTL were significant in a multiple regression analysis (MRA), where the full model explained 63% of the variation among SW means. Six QTL for seed length were detected on LGs 2, 3, 4, 8, and 11 using CIM. The markers associated with the three seed length QTL on LGs 2, 8, and 11 were significant in a MRA with the full model explaining 48% of the variation among seed length means. Three QTL for seed height on LGs 4, 6, and 11 explained 36% of the phenotypic variation for trait means. Four of the six QTL for seed length and two of three QTL for seed height also appeared to correspond to QTL for SW.

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H.M. Ariyarathne and D.P. Coyne

Halo blight is one of the most important bacterial diseases of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). It is serious under moderate temperature and high humidity conditions. The disease is caused by a seed-borne bacterium, Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (Burkh.) Dowson (Psp). The inheritance of leaf reactions to Psp, flower, and stem color was studied using greenhouse-grown 109 F9 recombinant inbred lines (RI) from the P. vulgaris cross BelNeb 1 [resistant (R)] (USDA/NE) × A 55 [susceptible (S)] (CIAT). Two Psp strains, HB16 (NE) and 83-Sc2A (NE), were inoculated using the water-soaking method. A segregation ratio of 1 R:1 S RI lines were observed for disease reactions in leaves for both strains indicating major gene control. The presence of recombinants for SR, RS to the strains indicated that different genes were involved. Stem (SC) and flower (FC) color traits were each determined by two major genes. Linkages were found for reactions to the two Psp strains and also between FC and SC. No linkages were observed from FC and also SC with reactions to Psp strains.

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Mark J. Bassett

The inheritance of flower and seedcoat color was studied using Lamprecht line M0137 (PI 527845) of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) as the source of a new allele, V wf, at the V locus. The cross M0137 c res V wf × C v BC2 5-593 (a genetic tester stock) was studied in progeny of the F1, F2, F3, and F4 generations. The observed segregation for flower and seed colors was consistent with the hypothesis that M0137 carried a new allele, V wf, that produced (in the presence of P C J G B) white flowers and black seeds rather than the white flowers and mineral-brown seeds produced (in the presence of P C J G B) by v. The V/V wf genotype produced cobalt-violet flowers, the same as V/v. A test cross of F3 V wf × t BC1 5-593 bipunctata demonstrated that V wf is not allelic with t, a gene that can produce white or colored flowers and self-colored or partly colored seeds, depending on background genotype.

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Mark J. Bassett

The inheritance of a seedcoat pattern having white micropyle stripe (WMS) on a colored background was studied in two common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) accessions from Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical—G12606 and G07262. The WMS character from G12606 was backcrossed into the recurrent parent 5-593, which has black seedcoats. Test crosses of the derived WMS stocks (BC1 and BC2) with genetic tester stocks stp (stippled seedcoat) BC2 5-593 and stp hbw (flowers with half banner petal white) BC3 5-593, respectively, demonstrated in F1 and F2 progenies that WMS is controlled by an allele at the Stp locus. The gene symbol stp mic is proposed for the allele expressing the WMS character. The dominance order at the Stp locus is Stp > stp mic > stp hbw > stp. Although stp and stp hbw each produce a different color pattern on flowers, stp mic does not produce patterned flowers. A selection from accession G07262 with a long, white micropyle stripe was crossed with 5-593 to derive a stock named F3 stp mic long micropyle stripe, which was then crossed to the genetic tester stock t z virgarcus BC2 5-593 to produce F1 and F2. Expression of the long micropyle stripe was controlled by the interaction of t and stp mic in the genotype t Z stp mic. The triple recessive interaction from genotype t z stp mic was also observed.

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Mark J. Bassett, Kirk Hartel, and Phil McClean

Inheritance of Anasazi pattern of partly colored seedcoats in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) was studied in a genetic stock t ana B V Anasazi BC3 5-593, whose Anasazi pattern is derived from Plant Introduction (PI) 451802. Line 5-593 is a determinate, Florida dry bean breeding line (with small black seeds) used as the recurrent parent in the development of many genetic stocks. The F2 from the cross t ana B V Anasazi BC3 5-593 × t z virgarcus BC3 5-593 segregated for two nonparental phenotypic classes and was consistent with the hypothesis that a single recessive gene, with tentative symbol ana, produces the Anasazi pattern with t Z ana and a new partly colored pattern Anabip with t z ana. Thus, the Anasazi factor is not an allele at the Z locus. Analysis of 57 random F3 progenies from the cross t ana B V Anasazi BC3 5-593 × t z virgarcus BC3 5-593 supported a genetic model where: 1) with t Z the Anasazi phenotype is controlled by a single recessive gene ana, i.e., genotype t Z ana, 2) the Anabip phenotype has the genotype t z ana, and 3) t Z/z ana produces a restricted Anasazi pattern. The allelism test cross t z ana Anabip BC3 5-593 × t z l ers white BC3 5-593 produced complementation in the F2, demonstrating nonallelism of Ana (actually Bip) with the L locus. The allelism test cross t z ana Anabip BC3 5-593 × t z bip bipunctata BC3 5-593 failed to show complementation in F1 and F2, demonstrating allelism of Ana with the Bip locus. Using bulk segregant analysis, molecular markers linked in coupling to the Ana (OM9200, 5.4 cM) and Bip (OJ17700, 6.0 cM) genes were discovered. Allelism was also suggested by the result that the same linkage distance and recombination pattern were observed when the Ana marker was used to score the bipunctata population. We propose the gene symbol bip ana for the recessive allele at the Bip locus that produces Anasazi pattern with genotype t Z bip ana and the Anabip pattern with genotype t z bip ana. Although bip ana and bip are both recessive to Bip, their interactions with the Z locus are extraordinarily different. The pattern restrictive power of bip ana expresses partly colored pattern with t Z, whereas bip requires t z to express partly colored pattern.

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Mark J. Bassett

The inheritance of a new allele, cv, at the C locus for seedcoat color was studied in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) using plant introduction (PI) accession 527774 as the source of cv. The cross PI 527774 (yellow-brown seed) x v BC25-593 (mineral-brown seed) genetic tester stock was studied in F1 and F2 progeny. An F3 selection from the above cross, designated F3 cv G b v, was crossed to 5-593 (a Florida breeding line with black seeds), and the F1, and F2 progeny were analyzed for color segregation. The second hackcross [S-593 x F1 (F3 cv G b v x 5-593)] was investigated in selfed progenies from 32 random BC2-F1 parents. Two of the BC2-F2 progenies were further tested in BC2,-F3. A third hackcross of cv to 5-593 was made and analyzed, and an allelism test of cv B V BC2-F35-593 with the cartridge huff cu BC3 5-593 genetic tester stock confirmed that cv is an allele at C. The gene symbol, cv, is proposed for the new allele because it is only expressed with V and gives a grayish-brown seedcoat. Genotypes with C/cv do not show heterozygous mottling with G B v or G b v, and there is no difference in seedcoat color between C G B v and cv G B v, or between C G b v and cv G b v.

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Mark J. Bassett

The P locus in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) can express complete absence of color (white) in seedcoats and flowers with p (with B V) or a pale grayish white seedcoat and nearly white flower with p gri, but P has never been considered a seedcoat pattern locus. Genes controlling seedcoat colors and patterns have been backcrossed into the recurrent parent 5-593 with black seedcoats and violet flowers. The cross, p BC3 5-593 × t stp mic BC3 5-593 (black seeds with a long white micropyle stripe and fibula arcs), failed to show evidence of genetic complementation in either F1 or F2 progeny, leading to the hypothesis that P and Stp are allelic. Five cross combinations between two recessive P alleles (p BC3 5-593 and p gri BC3 5-593) and three recessive alleles at the stippled seedcoat gene Stp (stp BC3 5-593, stp hbw BC3 5-593, and stp mic BC3 5-593) expressed no genetic complementation in seedcoats and flowers of F1 progeny and confirmed the allelism hypothesis. New gene symbols are proposed for the recessive alleles at Stp, viz., p stp for stp, p hbw for stp hbw and p mic for stp mic. The dominance order at P is P > p mic > p hbw > p stp > p gri > p. Crosses were made between t self-colored BC3 5-593 and three other parents—p stp BC3 5-593, p hbw BC3 5-593, and p mic BC3 5-593—to explore interactions between the pattern genes T and P; and segregation for seedcoat patterns in F2 was discussed. The hypothesis was proposed that the T locus regulates expression at P, or the biosynthetic step regulated by P.