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Open access

R. M. Skirvin and Jules Janick

Abstract

In vitro techniques were developed to regenerate plantlets (calliclones) from callus of scented geraniums (Pelargonium spp.). Calliclones were compared to plants derived from stem, root, and petiole cuttings of 5 cultivars. Plants from stem cuttings of all cultivars were uniform and identical to the parental clone. Plants from root and petiole cuttings were more variable with the amount of variation dependent upon cultivar. High variability was associated with calliclones. Aberrant types included changes in plant and organ size, leaf and flower morphology, essential oil constituents, fasciation, pubesence, and anthocyanin pigmentation. Calliclone variation was dependent upon clone and age of callus. Variability in calliclones was due to segregation of chimeral tissue, euploid changes, and heritable changes which may involve individual chromosomal aberrations or simple gene mutations. Variability of calliclones might be exploited for improvement of vegetatively propagated crops especially highly polyploid, sterile lines.

Open access

Michael Marcotrigiano, Pamela A. Morgan, Harry J. Swartz, and Jennifer Ruth

Abstract

A phenotypic and sexual analysis of Fragaria vesca ‘Albo-Marginata’ determined that the leaf variegation was of chimeral origin. Stable periclinal chimeras were established in vitro from runner tips. Plants were transferred to proliferation media containing 0.5 μm IBA, 0.3 μm GA3, and BA at either 0, 1.3, 4.4, or 13.2 μm. Whereas the histogens of field-grown runner plants remained stable, more than 90% of the plantlets propagated in vitro varied from the original explants. Most variants were albino or were green, but some were mericlinal chimeras. Histological evidence indicated that many shoots were adventitious, arising from basal callus tissue or petioles. Chemical names used: 1H-indole-3-butanoic acid (IBA); gibberellic acid (GA3); N-(phenylmethyl)-1H-purin-6-amine (BA).

Open access

Wilbur C. Anderson

Abstract

Revision of the Murashige-Skoog (MS) 1962 inorganic formula was necessary for the successful culture of rhododendron cultivars. A bioassay system was developed to assess the effects of modifying the MS formula. Inorganic revisions included reduction of nitrogen from 60 to 14.7 mm and potassium from 20 to 4.7 mm. Phosphorus was adjusted to 2.75 mm. Iron concentration was doubled to 200 μm and iodine was reduced to 1.8 μm. These changes reduced the salinity of the inorganics from 5.2 to 2.2 mmho cm−1. General growth regulator concentrations for shoot proliferation are 1 mg/liter 3-aceticindole acid (I A A) and 5 mg/liter N6-(2-isopentenyl)-adenine (2iP), but these concentrations vary among cultivars.

Free access

Carrie A. Radcliffe, James M. Affolter, and Hazel Y. Wetzstein

for reintroduction and safeguarding purposes. Ex situ propagation efforts often play an integral role in plant conservation ( Guerrant et al., 2004 ; Maunder and Culham, 1999 ). Tissue culture has been used to propagate rare species ( Fay, 1992 ; Fay

Free access

Silvia R. Marino, Jeffrey G. Williamson, James W. Olmstead, and Philip F. Harmon

potential to produce large numbers of plants more quickly than by rooted cuttings, and tissue culture plants can be produced throughout the year ( Isutsa and Pritts, 1994 ; Miller et al., 2004 ). Although changes in the growth habit of micropropagated

Free access

Yun-Peng Zhong, Zhi Li, Dan-Feng Bai, Xiu-Juan Qi, Jin-Yong Chen, Cui-Guo Wei, Miao-Miao Lin, and Jin-Bao Fang

screen potential resistant resources for kiwifruit breeding or rootstock selection in future studies, the growth and physiological responses of five Actinidia species to PEG-induced drought stress under tissue culture conditions were measured, and the

Free access

Bo-Ling Liu, Zhi-Bin Fan, Ze-Qun Liu, Xun-Hong Qiu, and Yan-Hong Jiang

-pollination in the field may lead to varietal loss ( Shan et al., 2007 ). In recent years, methodological advances in plant tissue culture methods have allowed its use as a viable approach for multiplication, germplasm conservation, and genetic manipulation of

Open access

Ute Albrecht, Shahrzad Bodaghi, Bo Meyering, and Kim D. Bowman

cuttings and tissue culture propagation, are required to produce the desired quantities of trees. Propagation by cuttings and tissue culture will result in genetically identical rootstocks that can be used as liners for grafting ( Albrecht et al., 2017a

Free access

Muhammad Irshad, Hafiz Muhammad Rizwan, Biswojit Debnath, Muhammad Anwar, Min Li, Shuang Liu, Bizhu He, and Dongliang Qiu

tissue culture system among the chief reasons. There have been several published reports on okra regeneration because it was first successfully accomplished by Mangat and Roy (1986) using nodes and shoot tips of in vitro grown seedlings ( Anisuzzaman et

Free access

Justin A. Schulze, Jason D. Lattier, and Ryan N. Contreras

(12 weeks after pollination) Prunus lusitanica seeds without testa in Expt. I. Seeds underwent 10-week cold stratification and 5 weeks under standard culture conditions in eight variations of MS ( Murashige and Skoog, 1962 ) tissue culture medium