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David Tay, Joseph Tychonievich, and Stephanie Burns

Poster Session 17–Seed and Stand Establishment 19 July 2005, 12:00–12:45 p.m., Poster Hall–Ballroom E/F

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Samuel Contreras and Margarita Barros

Poster Session 17–Seed and Stand Establishment 19 July 2005, 12:00–12:45 p.m., Poster Hall–Ballroom E/F

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Laura E. Crawford and Martin M. Williams II

that may affect crop emergence is seed size. Edamame seed mass is ≈30 g/100-seed compared with 15 to 20 g/100-seed for grain-type soybean ( Bernard, 2005 ; Dong et al., 2014 ; Williams, 2015 ). The literature is inconclusive on how seed size affects

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Michael N. Dana and Ricky D. Kemery

133 POSTER SESSION 20 Seed Establishment/Cross-Commodity

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Marla K. Faver, Janice M. Coons, and John A. Juvik

133 POSTER SESSION 20 Seed Establishment/Cross-Commodity

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Yuting Zou, Yanan Wang, Mingwei Zhu, Shuxian Li, and Qiuyue Ma

Seeds serve as a strong metabolic library, which is why seed development is an important stage for higher plants. During the process of seed maturation, substances such as starch, protein, and lipids are transformed and accumulated. Pavithra et al

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Andrew Raymond Jamieson

rhizomes to form colonies often several meters in diameter, but originally they would have arrived as seed dispersed in the droppings of birds or mammals ( Hall et al., 1979 ). The genetic diversity within a field is readily visible by color variation

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Hector E. Pérez

, offshoots, or tissue culture, the vast majority of landscape palms are propagated by seeds. However, commercial production of many palm species is hampered by delayed and inconsistent germination. Such sporadic germination is often due to seed dormancy

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Marilyn H.Y. Hovius, John T.A. Proctor, and Richard Reeleder

133 POSTER SESSION 20 Seed Establishment/Cross-Commodity

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Theresa L. Bosma, Janet C. Cole, Kenneth E. Conway, and John M. Dole

Approved for publication by the director of the Oklahoma Agricultural Experiment Station. This research was supported under project H-2324. The technical assistance of Peggy Reed is greatly appreciated. Canterbury bells seeds were provided