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Mary M. Peet and Suguru Sato

109 ORAL SESSION 28 (Abstr. 572–579) Fruit Set & Seed Quality–Vegetables

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J.E. Warren and M.A. Bennett

109 ORAL SESSION 28 (Abstr. 572–579) Fruit Set & Seed Quality–Vegetables

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Jeffrey G. Norcini and James H. Aldrich

native wildflower seed producer each in North Carolina and Alabama. One challenge facing the industry is seed quality, which can often vary within a species and even by seed origin ( Andersson and Milberg, 1998 ; Baskin and Baskin, 1998 ) and harvest

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Burcu Begüm Kenanoglu, Ibrahim Demir, and Henk Jalink

flowering times mature at different periods resulting in seeds of different quality. This affects seed quality in once-over harvesting (harvesting all fruits at the same time to produce a seed lot) systems. Multiple harvesting of fruits as they are mature

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Thomas E. Marler and Gil N. Cruz

reflect the most influential facet of how this armored scale reduces seed quality. For example, the absolute decline in gametophyte starch may have a much greater impact on seed viability because this haploid tissue is constructed to support embryo growth

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Christopher A. Clark, Tara P. Smith, Donald M. Ferrin, and Arthur Q. Villordon

compared with the original seed, it was estimated that viruses were then causing yield declines ranging as high as 25% to 40% ( Carroll et al., 2004 ). Thus, although potyvirus re-infection occurs very rapidly and may cause some decline in seed quality

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Ibrahim Demir, Tuba Celikkol, Golge Sarıkamıs, and Ceren Eksi

.L. 2007 Time to radical protrusion does not correlate with early seedling growth in individual seeds of impatiens and petunia J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 132 423 428 Ellis, R.H. Roberts, E.H. 1980 Towards a rational basis for testing seed quality 605 635

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W. L. Hollis

Abstract

“Seed, the germ of life - handle and use with care. ” Perhaps such a statement should appear boldly on all packets, cartons, and bags of seed to emphasize how precious the commodity really is. Agriculture and man's survival depends above all else on seed. As agricultural technology has progressed, greater and greater demands have been placed on seed, specifically with respect to performance. To inaugurate seed quality is not enough, we must also maintain it through to the successful establishment of a successive generation. Performance in the farmer's field is the ultimate test of seed quality.

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Edna Pesis and Timothy J Ng

Abstract

Seeds of 2 cultivars of muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) were subjected to accelerated aging at 45°C and 100% relative humidity (RH) for periods up to 288 hours. In general, longer periods of aging resulted in greater declines in seed quality as measured by laboratory, greenhouse, and field emergence and germination. Seeds of ‘Iroquois’ were more sensitive to aging than ‘Hale’s Best #36’. Significant declines in germination occurred prior to any significant increases in electrolytic leakage from decorticated seeds indicating that electrolytic leakage is not a suitable test for seed quality with muskmelon.

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Amnon Koren* and Menahem Edelstein

Achieving a uniform stand of grafted vegetable transplants in the field is critical to the grower because of the high cost of the grafted transplants. Low and erratic stands can lead to monetary losses even in an otherwise successful crop. Establishing a uniform stand of grafted vegetable transplants in the field depends on several additive parameters prevailing in the nursery and in the field. These include seed quality, grafted-transplant quality, and agrotechniques suitable for the special needs of grafted transplants. Seed quality and seed health should be given special emphasis as compared with non-grafted-transplant production. Grafted transplants spend more time in the nursery, are treated manually more, and are more susceptible to seed-borne pathogens. Field preparation, plastic mulch, irrigation and fertilization are important, especially in warm, mediterranean climates.