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Yan Bai, Wen Chen, Shou-Zan Liu, Lin-Yu Xu, Zhe Li, and Bin Liu

are specifically influenced by light are unclear. In this study, T. hemsleyanum was grown under color films to simulate different light conditions. Color films are widely used in T. hemsleyanum cultivation to decrease light intensity ( Gao and

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Kenneth R. Summy and Christopher R. Little

Remote sensing has been used for the last several decades to detect both abiotic and biotic stressors affecting agricultural crops. Studies have traditionally focused on aerial image acquisition using color infrared (CIR) photography of plant

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David B. Headley and Robert G. Mower

The color of a tree's canopy can provide much information about the tree's physiological status as well as its aesthetic function. We present a system for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of tree canopy color, based on a previously published algorithm. This algorithm determines (with a known accuracy) the Munsell hue, value, and chroma of a color using densitometric readings obtained through the use of color separation filters. This method was adapted for use with black-and-white video images. Combining the Rib algorithm with the techniques of photography, video imagery, scanning microdensitometry, and batch data computer processing, a semi-automated system was devised for the pixel-by-pixel color evaluation of a 512 × 512-pixel image. Based on a sample of 251 color chips, the following accuracies were obtained: Munsell hue—86%, Munsell value—93%, Munsell chroma—70%, and Munsell color—62%. An example is provided that demonstrates how this system may be used to determine tree canopy color. By employing this technique, an estimation may be made of the colors and their relative quantities that are displayed by a tree's canopy.

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Ignasi Iglesias and Simó Alegre

For many red and bicolored apple cultivars, including Gala, Delicious, and Fuji, red color (the intensity and quality of red skin) and fruit size are important parameters within the grading standards for European Union (EU) countries ( Diario

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Cecil Pounders, Tim Rinehart, Ned Edwards, and Patricia Knight

century were chance seedlings chosen for unique color or growth habit ( Egolf and Andrick, 1978 ). Today, commercial crapemyrtle production in the United States is primarily by means of asexual propagation of named clones ( Byers, 1997 ). Many clones are

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Ryan N. Contreras, John M. Ruter, James S. Owen Jr., and Andy Hoegh

identify an early predictor of winter foliage color (resistance to leaf browning) in japanese-cedar as a screening tool for identifying superior selections. Specifically, we assessed if quantitating pigments such as total chlorophyll ( C a + b ), ratio of

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Christina H. Hagerty, Alfonso Cuesta-Marcos, Perry Cregan, Qijian Song, Phil McClean, and James R. Myers

-Ts- expresses incomplete string, and ststTs- and ststtsts have complete string. With the exception of St , none of these traits have been placed on a linkage map or have been characterized using modern molecular tools. Seed color is an important trait in

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C.E. Johnson, J.T. Payne, and K.C. Pee

Controlled crosses of a Vermillion red flesh color cultivar with 4 normal red flesh color cultivars were made. F1, F2, and backcross generations were grown in the field and the fruits evaluated for flesh color. All fruits of the F1 generation were Vermillion. The F2 generation segregated to a 9:7 ratio of vermillion to normal in all crosses. The probabilities of fit ranged from 0.10 to 0.95. This ratio is indicative of two dominant genes with complementary effects or double recessive epistasis, Backcrosses to the dominant parent produced almost all vermillion flesh fruit. Backcrosses to the recessive parents did not fit any documented ratios. Further analysis of the BC generations seems to suggest that flesh color is controlled by two dominant genes.

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C.E. Johnson, J.T. Payne, and K.C. Pee

Controlled crosses of a Vermillion red flesh color cultivar with 4 normal red flesh color cultivars were made. F1, F2, and backcross generations were grown in the field and the fruits evaluated for flesh color. All fruits of the F1 generation were Vermillion. The F2 generation segregated to a 9:7 ratio of vermillion to normal in all crosses. The probabilities of fit ranged from 0.10 to 0.95. This ratio is indicative of two dominant genes with complementary effects or double recessive epistasis, Backcrosses to the dominant parent produced almost all vermillion flesh fruit. Backcrosses to the recessive parents did not fit any documented ratios. Further analysis of the BC generations seems to suggest that flesh color is controlled by two dominant genes.

Free access

Brian Makeredza, Helen Marais, Michael Schmeisser, Elmi Lötze, and Willem J. Steyn

). Masking of sunburn by anthocyanin in blushed and red cultivars may result in the misconception of cultivar susceptibility to sunburn. As anthocyanins mostly accumulate in the epidermal and hypodermal tissue of apple peel ( Gross, 1987 ), red color