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J.P. Syvertsen and M.L. Smith

Four-year-old `Redblush' grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) trees on either the relatively fast-growing rootstock `Volkamer' lemon (VL) (C. volkameriana Ten. & Pasq.) or on the slower-growing rootstock sour orange (SO) (C. aurantium L.) were transplanted into 7.9-m3 drainage lysimeter tanks filled with native Candler sand, irrigated similarly, and fertilized at three N rates during 2.5 years. After 6 months, effects of N application rate and rootstock on tree growth, evapotranspiration, fruit yield, N uptake, and leaching were measured during the following 2 years. When trees were 5 years old, low, medium, and high N application rates averaged about 79,180, or 543 g N/tree per year and about 126,455, or 868 g N/tree during the following year. Recommended rates average about 558 g N/tree per year. A lysimeter tank with no tree and additional trees growing outside lysimeters received the medium N treatment. Nitrogen concentration in the drainage water increased with N rate and exceeded 10 mg·liter-1 for trees receiving the high rates and also for the no tree tank. Leachate N concentration and total N recovered was greater from trees on SO than from those on VL. Average N uptake efficiency of medium N rate trees on VL was 6870 of the applied N and 61 % for trees on SO. Nitrogen uptake efficiency decreased with increased N application rates. Trees outside lysimeters had lower leaf N and fruit yield than lysimeter trees. Overall, canopy volume and leaf N concentration increased with N rate, but there was no effect of N rate on fibrous root dry weight. Fruit yield of trees on SO was not affected by N rate but higher N resulted in greater yield for trees on VL. Rootstock had no effect on leaf N concentration, but trees on VI. developed larger canopies, had greater fibrous root dry weight, used more water, and yielded more fruit than trees on SO. Based on growth, fruit yield and N leaching losses, currently recommended N rates were appropriate for trees on the more vigorous VL rootstock but were 22% to 69 % too high for trees on SO.

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W.A. Erb, A.D. Draper, and H. J. Swartz

Abbreviations: A, apparent net photosynthesis; Berryland, Berryland sand soil high in organic matter; CYV, canopy volume; DMP, dry-matter production; E, transpiration; g L , leaf conductance of water; Galestown, Galestown sandy clay loam soil; IC

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Kelly T. Morgan, T.A. Obreza, and J.M.S. Scholberg

planted intermittently during the previous 20 years, resulting in trees of widely ranging canopy volume. The trees had been fertilized with dry soluble fertilizer three or more times per year and were irrigated with wellwater using a low

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Alisson P. Kovaleski, Jeffrey G. Williamson, Bruno Casamali, and Rebecca L. Darnell

increased lateral shoot number and length compared with late pruning ( Bañados et al., 2009 ). Williamson and Darnell (1996) reported that regrowth and canopy volume of ‘Sharpblue’ SHB was greater when plants were pruned early after harvest compared with

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Peter C. Andersen and Brent V. Brodbeck

r 2 . Yield/m 2 canopy area was calculated in 2010, 2012, and 2014 as yield/tree cross-sectional area. Tree canopy volume was calculated using the equation for one half of an oblate spheroid (4/6 π r 2 h ) where r is the average tree cross

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Wendy L. Wilber and Jeffrey G. Williamson

fertilizer rate (fertilizer analyses combined) are reported for each cultivar independently. For leaf nutrient content, the effects of fertilizer analysis and rate are shown for each cultivar. Vegetative growth. Canopy volume for both cultivars

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Luis Rallo, Diego Barranco, Raúl de la Rosa, and Lorenzo León

consequence, the vigor of ‘Chiquitita’ in terms of canopy volume remained ≈60% to 70% of ‘Arbequina’ across years ( Table 2 ). ‘Chiquitita’ showed a compact and weeping habit of growth with dense canopy and branches trending downward with crop so that canopy

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Godfrey P. Miles, Ed Stover, Chandrika Ramadugu, Manjunath L. Keremane, and Richard F. Lee

commercial planting of Citrus . To maintain high ACP pressure and maximize challenge by C Las, no insecticides were applied, and high ACP populations were apparent year round. Growth measurements. Tree height, canopy width, tree canopy volume (TCV), trunk

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François Mademba-Sy, Zacharie Lemerre-Desprez, and Stéphane Lebegin

line (D line ); 2) canopy diameter perpendicular to the planting line (D perp ); 3) trunk diameter at 10 cm above the level of the graft; 4) trunk diameter at 10 cm below the level of the graft; and 5) tree height (H). Canopy volume was calculated using

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John A. Menge, Greg W. Douhan, Brandon McKee, Elinor Pond, Gary S. Bender, and Ben Faber

Luis Obispo Counties and Southern production zones included San Diego, Orange, and Riverside Counties. The variables tested were tree size (canopy volume), tree rating (for root rot resistance), salt rating, and yield. A separate analysis of each