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Reagan W. Hejl, Benjamin G. Wherley, and Charles H. Fontanier

use in the study: ‘Riley’s Super Sport’ (Celebration ® ) bermudagrass [ Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.], ‘Palisades’ zoysiagrass ( Zoysia japonica Steud.), ‘Floratam’ st. augustinegrass [ Stenotaphrum secundatum (Walt.) Kuntze], and ‘SeaStar’ seashore

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Daniel Hargey, Benjamin Wherley, Casey Reynolds, Richard White, and Garrett Parker

Winter overseeding of dormant bermudagrass ( Cynodon dactylon sp.) athletic turf has been a common practice in the transition zone and southern United States. Winter overseeding provides an actively growing cool-season turfgrass stand that provides

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Bakir A. Al-Juboory

This experiment was conducted to determine effects of herbicides on the control of noxious perennial grass weeds. The results indicate that the rate, timing, duration and number of applications employed were the major factors in the successful control of perennial grass weeds such as Cogon Grass (Imperala cylindrica), Johnson Grass (Sorghum halepense), Bermuda Grass (Cynodon dactylon), Nut Grass (Cyperus rotundus) and Common Red (Phragmites spp.), commonly found in Iraq growing both in cultivated fields and wild on uncultivated land.

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M.L. Elliott and M. Prevatte

Eco, Milorganite, Ringer, and Sustane natural organic fertilizers, alone or combined with the synthetic organic fertilizer isobutylidene diurea (IBDU), were compared with IBDU alone for their effect on a `Tifdwarf' hybrid bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. × C. transvaalensis Burtt-Davy] golf course putting green. Over the 2-year study period, no consistent differences were observed among the fertilizer treatments on the turfgrass growth parameters of quality, clipping weights, or root weights.

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K.L. Hays, J.F. Barber, M.P. Kenna, and T.G. McCollum

This study was conducted to determine rooting characteristics, root carbohydrate content, and performance of 10 bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] genotypes exposed to drought. A greenhouse study was conducted twice to determine root distribution and carbohydrate content throughout the soil profile during simulated drought stress. Root distribution among genotypes and accumulation of total nonstructural carbohydrate within roots differed with depths. Root mass at 30, 60, 90, and 150 cm was significantly correlated with turf quality during drought stress (r = 0.72, 0.86, 0.80, and 0.81, respectively) only for one of the two tests. Root carbohydrate distribution was not significantly correlated with turf quality for the selected bermudagrass genotypes.

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Julia Whitworth

The usefulness of cover crops for weed management in strawberries were evaluated. Wheat (Triticum aestevum L.), rye (Secale cereale L.), and crimson clover (Trifolium incarnatum L.) were grown in individual pots then killed by tillage or herbicide and followed in the same pots by plantings of bermuda grass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.], yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus L.), crabgrass [Digitaria ischaemum (Schreb.) Schreb. ex Muhl.], or strawberries (Fragaria ×ananassa `Cardinal'). Rye and wheat tilled into the medium generally increased the growth of strawberries and decreased the growth of bermuda grass. Rye and wheat residues appeared to suppress growth of weeds and strawberries when the residues remained on the medium surface. Crimson clover had little affect on the growth of weeds or strawberries. Yellow nutsedge and crabgrass were not significantly affected by cover crop residues.

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J.L. Nus and K. Shashikumar

Although the effect of cold winters on the severity of bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon Pers.) spring dead spot (SDS) has been studied, information is needed concerning the effect of infection by fungi associated with SDS on the host's freezing resistance. A-22 bermudagrass was inoculated with Leptosphaeria korrae J. Walker & A.M. Smith and Ophiospharella herpotricha (Fr.) J. Walker & A.M Smith. Differential thermal analysis was used to monitor exotherm temperatures of healthy and O. herpotricha- and L. korrae-infected A-22 bermudagrass at 10-day intervals during 90 days of acclimation in cold chambers. Healthy bermudagrass crowns supercooled to an average of -6.7C and fungi-infected crowns supercooled to an average of -4.8 and -4.4C, respectively. Healthy crown exotherm temperatures were significantly lower than those of fungi-infected bermudagrass crowns on all nine sampling dates. This result indicates that fungi-infected plants are more susceptible to cold damage.

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Michael W. Smith, Margaret E. Wolf, Becky S. Cheary, and Becky L. Carroll

Two studies were conducted to determine if selected grass and dicot species had an allelopathic interaction with pecan (Carya illinoinensis Wangenh. C. Koch). Leachate from pots with established grasses or dicots was used to irrigate container-grown pecan trees. Leachates from bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.], tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Shreb. cv. Kentucky 31), redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L.), and cutleaf evening primrose (Oenothera laciniata Hill) reduced leaf area and leaf dry weight about 20% compared to the controls. Bermudagrass, tall fescue, and primrose leachate decreased pecan root weight 17%, trunk weight 22%, and total tree dry weight 19% compared to the control. In a second study, trees were 10% shorter than the control when irrigated with bermudagrass or pigweed leachate.

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S.K. Braman, R.R. Duncan, and M.C. Engelke

Turfgrass selections including 21 paspalums (Paspalum vaginatum Swartz) and 12 zoysiagrasses (Zoysia sp.) were compared with susceptible `KY31' tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) and more resistant common bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon Pers.) and common centipedegrass [Eremochloa ophiuroides (Munro.) Hack] for potential resistance to fall armyworm [Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith)], an occasionally serious pest of managed turf. Turfgrass and pasture grasses annually suffer sporadic damage by this pest, often severe in the Gulf Coast states. Resistant grasses offer an alternative management tool for the fall armyworm, reducing the need for pesticide use. Laboratory evaluations assessed the degree of antibiosis and nonpreference present among more than 30 turfgrass genotypes to first and third instar fall armyworms, respectively. Zoysiagrasses exhibiting high levels of antibiosis included `Cavalier', `Emerald', DALZ8501, DALZ8508, `Royal', and `Palisades'. Paspalum selections demonstrating reduced larval or pupal weights or prolonged development times of fall armyworm included 561-79, Temple-2, PI-509021, and PI-509022.

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R.N. Carrow and B.J. Johnson

A turfgrass wear injury study was conducted at Griffin, Ga., on `Tifway' bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon × C. transvaalensis) using two golf car tires and three golf car types driven in a semicircular pattern to deliver 85 passes over the tread path plot area. Wear injury for the 14 days after wear was applied was assessed by visual quality, percent green coverage, leaf bruising, and verdure. Golf tire × car interactions occurred, but more wear occurred with the low pressure (48 × 103 Pa), dimpled tread tire with flexible sidewalls than the commonly used bias ply (4-ply), V-shaped tread tire with more rigid sidewalls. Significant differences in wear damage occurred for golf car type but were influenced by tire design. Thus, selection of golf car tire and golf car type can influence the degree of wear injury on turfgrass sites.