Search Results

You are looking at 61 - 70 of 1,487 items for :

  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Free access

Bruce W. Wood

The cyclic, alternate bearing and correlative aspects of U.S. produced pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch] nuts are characterized. An attempt to forecast production using stepwise autoregressive techniques identified a national level biennial cycle for cultivar (CV) and seedling (SC) class nuts and a novemennial (9 year) cycle for SG class nuts. The intensity of the biennial cycle at the national level has generally been low to moderate over the last 50 years for CV and SG class nuts with no clear time trend being expressed. During the most recent years (1979-1991), national production of CV class nuts has not exhibited pronounced bienniality, whereas that of SG class nuts exhibited a moderate bienniality. The nature of the the irregularity of cycling of U.S. and state production appears to nullify the use of univariate polynomial equations as a practical tool for accurately forecasting nut production. Nut production within individual states was also cyclic, with 2-, 3-, 5, 6-, 10-, 12-, 14-, 15-, and 16-year cycles, depending on state and nut class. The most intense contemporary biennial cycles for CV class nuts were from Oklahoma, South Carolina, and North Carolina, whereas cycling of SG class nuts was most intense in Texas and Oklahoma. Correlations of production within and among states indicated that most interrelationships are relatively weak; however, national production of CV class nuts are highly correlated (r = 0.96) with the production of CV class nuts in Georgia, whereas that of SG class nuts is most correlated with that of Louisiana.

Free access

Terri Woods Starman

This study investigated the effects of concentration and application time of uniconazole as a spray for single- or double-pinched ornamental pepper (Capsicum annuum L. `Holiday Cheer'). Concentrations from 5.0 to 15.0 mg·liter-1 gave adequate height control, except that 15.0 mg·liter-1 reduced height excessively when applied 8, but not 10, weeks after sowing. Increasing uniconazole concentration increased red fruit percentage when applied at 10, but not 8, weeks after sowing. These results indicate that the later application was beneficial and may lessen the overdosing problem associated with triazole growth regulators. Chemical name used: (E)-(S)-1-(4-chlrophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-pent-1-ene-3-oll(uniconazole).

Free access

B.W. Wood

Alternately bearing `Cheyenne' pecan [Carya illinoensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch] trees were studied to assess the temporal aspects of previous season fruit development on several reproductive and vegetative traits of horticultural importance. Action spectra were generated and used to identify the relative sensitivities of these traits to the temporal aspects of fruiting. Based on date of maximum rate of change in sigmoidal models fitted to these action spectra, the relative sensitivity of certain important growth and developmental parameters to fruit removal time was number of distillate flowers per terminal shoot > number of distillate flowers per flower cluster on lateral shoots> length of terminal shoots > percentage of lateral shoots with fruit= catkins per terminal shoot at top of the tree> percentage of terminal shoots with fruit > catkins per standard terminal shoot> shoots produced per l-year-old branch> percentage of l-year-old shoot death. Maximum rates of change for these reproductive and vegetative parameters were typically during the dough stage of ovule development; however, substantial change also occurred for several parameters over a much wider developmental window. No evidence was found for a hormone-like translocatable factor from developing fruit that either promotes or inhibits flowering. Extending the time from nut ripening to leaf drop increased production of staminate and distillate flowers the following year and appeared to increase fruit set.

Full access

Bruce W. Wood

The United States pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch] industry is based on about 10,107,170 trees (about 15% nonbearing) comprising about 492,137 acres (199,168 ha) of orchards (34% in Texas, 27% Georgia, and 17% Oklahoma) dispersed among about 19,900 farm operations (36% in Texas, 16% Georgia, and 7% Oklahoma) in 24 states. Fifty-six percent of this acreage is on farms with ≥100 acres (40.5 ha) of trees (i.e., 5% of total farms). An evaluation of production related changes over the last decade indicate fundamental changes occurring in the nature of the U. S. industry. These include a) movement toward agricultural industrialization as reflected by fewer small-farms and more large-farms; b) reduced percentage of young (i.e., nonbearing) trees in most major producing states; c) substantial decline in number of farms and acres in the southeastern regionhistorically the primary production area-yet substantial growth in the northern region of production; d) a national 3% increase in the number of pecan farms and 14% increase in acreage; and e) substantial demographic changes, such as the enhanced importance of the southwestern region including New Mexico with diminished importance of many southeastern states. States also drastically differ in degree of biennial bearing, as measured by the biennial bearing index (i.e., K = 0.04 - 0.73; where 0 = no production variation and 1 = maximum variation), average production efficiency of both orchards [Epa = 192 - 1,224 lb/acre (215 - 1,374 kg·ha-1)] and trees [Ept = 19 - 60 lb/tree (8.6 kg/tree)], variation in grower prices (cv = 18 - 36%), and relationship between price and national supply of pecan (r 2 = 0.94 - 0.03). For the pecan industry as a whole, average price received for nut-meats is as closely associated with national supply of pecan nut-meats as that of almond and pistachio and is far better than that of walnut-pecan's primary competitor. The supply of pecan meats on-hand at the beginning of the season, plus supply from the current season's crop, plus the price of walnut meats accounts for 80% of price variation in average United States pecan meat price.

Free access

Bruce W. Wood

Dormant season sprays of hydrogen cyanamide applied to pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch] trees advanced budbreak, flowering, and shuck dehiscence. Hydrogen cyanamide was applied to dormant branches at ≈60, 45, 30, and 15 days before normal vegetative budbreak at rates of 0, 120, 240, 480, and 960 mm (corresponding to ≈0%, 0.5%, 1%, 2%, and 4%, solutions for 3 years). Depending on treatment, hydrogen cyanamide advanced budbreak by as much as 17 days, female and male flower maturity by up to 15 days, and nut ripening by as much as 14 days without reducing nut yield or causing phytotoxicity. Hydrogen cyanamide applied at 480 to 960 mm ≈60 days before expected budbreak possibly may be used commercially to advance ripening, manipulate time of pollen dispersal, and substitute for chilling when pecan is grown in mild environments.

Free access

Bruce W. Wood

Pecan is wind pollinated, exhibits heterodichogamy and are either protandrous (I) or protogynous (II). Orchards are typically established using two complimentary flowering types but with no further scrutiny as to the degree of compatibility of these two types. Additionally, orchards are sometime established with a very low frequency of pollinator. An evaluation of several orchards revealed that yield losses are due to poor pollination is likely common. Data indicate that trees beyond about 46 m (150 feet) from a complementary pollinator exhibit substantial reductions in fruit-set; therefore, large block-type plantings are disadvantaged. Flowering data over several years show that Type I and Type II cultivars are often functionally noncomplementary, suggesting that pecan cultivars should also be identified with a seasonal identification (i.e., early, mid, and late). Data also indicate that dichogamy patterns substantially change as trees age or with abnormally warm or cool springs; hence, pollination patterns will vary depending upon orchard age. Data indicate that orchards should be comprised of 3+ cultivars. RAPD-DNA analysis of “hooked-nuts” indicates that this trait is not reliable as an indicator of selfing.

Free access

Bruce W. Wood

Canopy morphology of 83 pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch] cultivars differed in structural, size, and form characteristics. Cluster analysis identified two to five distinct classes for canopy height and diameter and their ratio, inclination angles for both major limbs and young shoots with lower-order structures, branch types, and canopy form and volume. Cultivar-related variability in these traits may have the potential for the improvement of pecan cultivars for factors such as light interception, cooling, air movement, and fruiting; thus, there is potential for identifying the development of canopy characteristics adapted to specific site conditions or cultural/management strategies.

Free access

Bruce W. Wood

Inadequate cross-pollination of pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch] occurred in block-type orchards generally thought exempt from pollination-related crop losses because of an abundance of nearby potential pollinizers. “Off-genotypes” appeared to be potentially major assets in such orchards due to their role as backup pollinizers; hence, their presence insures against crop losses due to poor pollination. Fruit-set in `Desirable' main crop rows declined sigmoidally as distance from 'Stuart' pollinizer rows increased. For 15.4-m row spacings, rate of decrease was maximum between 49 and 78 m, depending on crop year. Maximum fruit-set was in rows immediately adjacent to the pollinizer. Tree age/size and spring temperature influences on the characteristics of flower maturity windows are probably primary factors contributing to pollination-related fruit-set losses in block-type orchards relying upon pollen from a single complementary pollinizer or from neighborhood trees. For example, flower maturity was earlier in older/larger trees, and higher spring temperatures accelerated catkin development relative to that of pistillate flowers. Maximum fruit-set occurred when pistillate flowers received pollen around 1 day or less after becoming receptive, whereas no fruit-set occurred when they were pollinated around four or more days after initial receptivity. These findings indicate that many block-type orchards in the southeastern United States are exhibiting pollination-related crop reductions and that future establishment of such orchards merits caution regarding the spatial and temporal distribution of pollinizers.

Free access

Terri Woods Starman

Manually and chemically pinched plants of 18 cultivars of Impatiens hybrids (Kientzler New Guinea impatiens) were compared to control plants to determine the effect of shoot apex removal on flowering, plant size, and branching characteristics. Either pinching treatment delayed flowering by ≈3 days compared with nonpinched controls. Pinching had no effect on plant height or fresh or dry weight. Plant diameter and form changes due to pinching depended on cultivar. Total branch count was increased by chemical but not manual pinching although both pinching methods affected mode of branching. The 18 cultivars of Kientzler New Guinea impatiens were best grown as 0.4-liter potted plants without the aid of pinching.

Free access

Terri Woods Starman

Single and multiple sprays of uniconazole at 0, 5, 10, or 20 mg·liter-1 were compared with daminozide sprays at 2500 mg·liter-1 applied twice for height control of Dendranthema × grandiflorum (Ramat.) Kitamura (Chrysanthemum × morifolium Ramat.) `Puritan' and `Favor'. A single uniconazole spray at 20 mg·liter-1 applied 2 weeks after pinching or two uniconazole applications at 10 mg·liter-1 applied 2 and 4 weeks after pinching were as effective as daminozide for reducing height. Drenches of uniconazole at 0, 0.025, 0.05, or 0.10 mg a.i./pot were compared with ancymidol drenches at 0.45 mg a.i./pot for controlling height of `Bright Golden Anne'. Although ancymidol was more effective, a 0.10-mg uniconazole drench adequately reduced height.