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Mary Haque, John Acorn, James Stockham, and Ireland Regnier

Abstract

Agriculture’s image has suffered of late. The media’s exploitation of news about farmer’s financial problems, movies like “Country” and “Places in the Heart” dramatizing families struggling to earn a living on the farm, and songs by singers such as Charley Pride lamenting that “if we can put a man up on the moon, why can’t we keep one down on the farm?” have contributed to a negative image. This image is extending to the whole of agriculture, and it is evident in bacculaureate enrollments, which declined by ≈30% in agriculture at land-grant universities between 1977 and 1983 (1).

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Melanie Stock

Across the United States, farm demographics and the way people access information are changing. In the last Census of Agriculture from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agriculture Statistic Service (USDA-NASS), the number of female farm

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Donald R. Davis

mineral depletion or changes in agricultural practices. Another evidence against the generality of the soil–mineral depletion hypotheses is their finding that median R values are less than 1 for protein, P, and ash [mostly potassium (K)] ( Fig. 3 ) despite

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Katharine B. Perry, Rodger R. Getz, and H. Ray Kimsey Jr.

Access to weather information for planning and implementing horticultural practices is an important component of the production system for growers. Advances in meteorological instrumentation, data acquisition and storage, and communications technologies have improved greatly the potential for applying sophisticated weather information into daily on-farm decisionmaking. The North Carolina Agricultural Weather Program seeks to provide weather information to the horticultural interests of the state. It has developed over the past 13 years. Recently, budget reductions near 50% and the loss of two-thirds of the extension full-time equivalents have necessitated significant changes. Through regional cooperation and the use of electronic communications technology, the program has sustained these negative impacts and emerged as an improved program. This paper describes the evolution of a state agricultural weather program into what is now a regional cooperative project to provide the weather information horticultural producers require.

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Bruno Quebedeaux

Abstract

Horticulturists and ASHS Members from both developed and developing countries have had and will continue to have a significant influence on international agricultural development. Horticultural crop production is an extremely important aspect of the total agricultural and rural development in most countries. Horticultural crops, in spite of their importance, have been neglected in many developing countries in favor of agronomic grain crops, livestock, and industrialization. The neglect of fruit, vegetable, and ornamental development is serious in Africa and exists in many Asian and Latin American countries. Several African countries are experiencing a series of droughts that have caused mass starvation and human misery. Horticulturists are concerned with the quality of life and are involved with other scientists and colleagues in implementing freedom-from-hunger strategies in developing countries.

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R. McSorley

This work was supported by the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, and approved for publication as journal series R-08225.

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Allen D. Owings, Charles E. Johnson, and M. LeRon Robbins

Educational and research opportunities utilizing native plant species are being developed by the LSU Agricultural Center through the recent establishment of a native plant arboretum at the Calhoun Research Station. Plants indigenous to Louisiana and surrounding states are being collected and planted in the arboretum for evaluation of potential values for landscaping, in food industries, and/or wildlife management. Native trees being studied include species of oak (Quercus), maple (Acer), hickory (Carya), and dogwood (Cornus). Lesser known species of holly (Ilex) and hawthorn (Crataegus), are being evaluated for commercial production and landscape potential. Fruit being collected for field orchard studies include mayhaw (Crataegus opaca), pawpaw (Asimina triloba), and several native plums (Prunus spp.).

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Frank G. Dennis, John F. Kelly, and Wink Laurie

Abstract

A sketch of Eustace Hall is on the cover of this issue of HortScience. Eustace Hall was designed by Liberty Hyde Bailey and was the first building in the United States devoted exclusively to the study and teaching of horticulture. It was completed in 1888—the year of the founding of the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station. It was named Eustace Hall in memory of Harry J. Eustace, Department Head from 1908–1919. In addition to offices and classrooms, the twostory brick structure contained a photographic darkroom and rooms for grafting and storage of nursery stock. Now the home of the University College, it is the second oldest building on campus.

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Norman R. Scott, Corinne Johnson Rutzke, and Louis D. Albright

One of the deterrents to the commercial adoption of controlled-environment agriculture (CEA) on a broad scale is the significant energy cost for lighting and thermal environmental control. Advances in energy conversion technologies, such as internal combustion engines (ICs), microturbines and fuel cells, offer the potential for combined heat and power (CHP) systems, which can be matched with the needs of CEA to reduce fossil-based fuels consumption. A principal concept delineated is that an integrated entrepreneurial approach to create business and community partnerships can enhance the value of energy produced (both electrical and heat). Energy production data from a commercial dairy farm is contrasted with energy use data from two greenhouse operations with varying energy-input requirements. Biogass produced from a 500-cow dairy combined with a 250-kW fuel cell could meet nearly all of the energy needs of both the dairy and an energy-intensive 740-m2 CEA greenhouse lettuce facility. The data suggest CEA greenhouses and other closely compatible enterprises can be developed to significantly alter agriculture, as we have known it.

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Robert J. Hoard and Michael J. Brewer

University (MSU)] for reviewing an earlier version of this paper. This work was supported, in part, by grants from MSU Project GREEEN, The Joyce Foundation, and the Center for Agricultural Partnerships as provided by the American Farmland Trust and the