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Dilip R. Panthee and Randy G. Gardner

‘Mountain Lion’ is a large-fruited, fresh-market hybrid tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum L.) developed by crossing NC 1CS × NC 2rinEC. It is resistant to verticillium wilt ( Verticillium dahliae Kleb) (race 1), fusarium wilt [ Fusarium oxysporum f

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Stephen L. Love, Bruce K. Werner, Horia I. Groza, and Asunta Thompson-Johns

Nine commercially available true potato seed (TPS) hybrids were compared to four standard clonal cultivars with respect to mean and uniformity of foliar characteristics and tuber traits important to the North American potato industry. The TPS hybrids were planted using second vegetative generation tubers derived originally from botanical seed. Ten plants from each plot were individually evaluated for plant height, vine maturity, early blight symptoms, and verticillium wilt symptoms. Following harvest, yield was determined and the tubers were rated or measured for appearance, shape, specific gravity, and french fry color. The TPS hybrids had mean values for all tuber and foliar traits, except plant height, that were not significantly different from those of one or more of the cultivars; generally, values for the hybrids fell amid those of the cultivars. Two of the hybrids were taller on average than any of the four cultivars. In contrast to the means, trait uniformity of the TPS hybrids was consistently less than for the cultivars. For all foliar traits, except plant height, the TPS hybrids were substantially less uniform than the standard cultivars. For specific gravity and french fry color, two important processing quality traits, the hybrids tended to be less uniform than the cultivars; however, the difference was much less pronounced than for the foliar traits. Four of the hybrids were not significantly less uniform than one or more of the cultivars for french fry color and seven were not less uniform for specific gravity. For many market uses, the TPS hybrids appeared to have the tuber yield and quality characteristics needed to compete with standard clonally propagated cultivars.

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Douglas V. Shaw, W.D. Gubler, Kirk D. Larson, and John Hansen

Resistance to wilt caused by Verticillium dahliae Kreb. was evaluated for 41 strawberry genotypes from the Univ. of California breeding program and 1000 offspring from crosses among 23 of these genotypes. Runner plants from these genotypes and seedlings were inoculated with a conidial suspension containing a mixture of five isolates of V. dahliae from strawberry. Symptoms were scored as the number of dead or seriously stunted plants per plot, or based on a subjective phenotypic resistance score assigned to each plot on five dates during the spring after planting. Most of the California germplasm is highly susceptible to V. dahliae, with an average resistance score of 2.1 (±0.10) and 84.1% (±2.1) plants stunted or dead compared with a score of 3.2 (±0.24) and 57.4% (±4.9) of plants stunted or dead for a control set of six non-California genotypes identified previously as resistant. However, a broad range of intermediate resistance was detected, and 4 of the 41 California genotypes evaluated had resistance scores superior to the mean score for the non-California resistant checks. Plot-mean heritabilities for resistance and stunting scores estimated using genotypic, full-sib family, and offspring-parent analyses ranged from 0.44 to 0.88. Comparison of different estimates of variance components suggests that half or more of the genotypic variance for resistance traits detected is due to the additive effects of genes. There appears to be sufficient variation within the California population to proceed with an effective selection program, despite the absence of directional selection for resistance during the past 3 decades. However, developing cultivars with adequate resistance will ultimately depend on the recovery of transgressive segregants from superior parents, as even the most resistant genotypes from all sources showed some disease symptoms.

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Dilip R. Panthee

‘Mountain Crown’ is a fresh-market plum tomato F 1 hybrid ( Solanum lycopersicum L.) developed by crossing NC 30P × NC 1 Plum. It is resistant to verticillium wilt ( Verticillium dahliae Kleb) (race 1) ( Ve/Ve gene), fusarium wilt ( Fusarium

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Randy G. Gardner and Dilip R. Panthee

. inbred line with NC l11F-2 (98). Both parents of ‘Amelia’ contribute the Ve gene for resistance to verticillium wilt ( Verticillium dahlia Kleb) and the I and I-2 genes for resistance to races 1 and 2 of fusarium wilt [ Fusarium oxysporium f

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Dilip R. Panthee and Randy G. Gardner

‘Mountain Majesty’ is a large-fruited, fresh-market hybrid tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum L.) developed by crossing NC 714 × NC 1CS. It is resistant to verticillium wilt ( Verticillium dahliae Kleb) (race 1), fusarium wilt [ Fusarium oxysporum f

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Randy G. Gardner and Dilip R. Panthee

‘Plum Regal’ is a fresh-market plum (Roma type) tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum L.) with crimson fruit color; resistance to verticillium wilt ( Verticillium dahliae ), fusarium wilt [ Fusarium oxysporium f.sp. lycopersici (Sacc.) W.C. Snyder and

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John W. Scott, Stephen M. Olson, and Jerry A. Bartz

-resistant to Gray leafspot incited by Stemphyllium spp. Webber ( Sm gene); and heterozygous-resistant to verticillium wilt race 1 incited by Verticillium dahliae Kleb. ( Ve gene). Fla. 8124C is the source of resistance to verticillium wilt because Fla

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Agnieszka Masny and Edward Żurawicz

), and powdery mildew (caused by Podosphaera aphanis ) and soil-borne disease such as verticillium wilt (caused by Verticillium dahliae ). ‘Pink Rosa’ is also recommended for off-season (delayed) production in the open field and under high tunnels

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Samuel F. Hutton, John W. Scott, and Joshua H. Freeman

verticillium wilt race 1 ( Verticillium dahliae ). Fla. 8814 is the donor of the I-3 ( Table 5 ), Sw-5 , and the Ve genes, and both Fla. 8814 and Fla. 8925 carry the I , I-2 , and Sm genes. Fla. 8925 is susceptible to the fruit disorder graywall, but