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Matteo Serena, Bernd Leinauer, Rossana Sallenave, Marco Schiavon, and Bernd Maier

. arundinacea Schreb.) ‘Barvado’, and perennial ryegrass ( Lolium perenne L.) ‘Premier II’, and two warm-season grasses, bermudagrass ( Cynodon dactylon L. Pers.) ‘Bargusto’ and seashore paspalum ( Paspalum vaginatum O. Swartz) ‘Sea Spray’, were included in

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Travis Wayne Shaddox and Joseph Bryan Unruh

fertilizer cycle (WFC), summer fertilizer cycle (SFC), and fall fertilizer cycle (FFC). Treatments were applied by hand to ‘Riley’s Super Sport’ (Celebration ® ) bermudagrass ( Cynodon dactylon ) grown on a Hallandale fine sand (siliceous, hyperthermic Lithic

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Kurt Steinke, David R. Chalmers, Richard H. White, Charles H. Fontanier, James C. Thomas, and Benjamin G. Wherley

rain shelter returned to its center position. Grasses evaluated in this parent study included eight cultivars of bermudagrass ( Cynodon dactylon sp.) (‘Celebration’, ‘Common’, ‘GN-1’, ‘Grimes EXP’, ‘Premier’, ‘TexTurf’, ‘TifSport’, and ‘Tifway’); seven

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James D. McCurdy, J. Scott McElroy, and Elizabeth A. Guertal

. Research was conducted within a maintained ‘Tifway’ hybrid bermudagrass [ Cynodon transvaalensis Burtt-Davy × C. dactylon (L.) Pers.] lawn on a Marvyn sandy loam (fine-loamy, kaolinitic, thermic Typic Kanhapludult) soil with an average pH of 6.3 (1

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Reagan W. Hejl, Benjamin G. Wherley, and Charles H. Fontanier

use in the study: ‘Riley’s Super Sport’ (Celebration ® ) bermudagrass [ Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.], ‘Palisades’ zoysiagrass ( Zoysia japonica Steud.), ‘Floratam’ st. augustinegrass [ Stenotaphrum secundatum (Walt.) Kuntze], and ‘SeaStar’ seashore

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Bakir A. Al-Juboory

This experiment was conducted to determine effects of herbicides on the control of noxious perennial grass weeds. The results indicate that the rate, timing, duration and number of applications employed were the major factors in the successful control of perennial grass weeds such as Cogon Grass (Imperala cylindrica), Johnson Grass (Sorghum halepense), Bermuda Grass (Cynodon dactylon), Nut Grass (Cyperus rotundus) and Common Red (Phragmites spp.), commonly found in Iraq growing both in cultivated fields and wild on uncultivated land.

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M.L. Elliott and M. Prevatte

Eco, Milorganite, Ringer, and Sustane natural organic fertilizers, alone or combined with the synthetic organic fertilizer isobutylidene diurea (IBDU), were compared with IBDU alone for their effect on a `Tifdwarf' hybrid bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. × C. transvaalensis Burtt-Davy] golf course putting green. Over the 2-year study period, no consistent differences were observed among the fertilizer treatments on the turfgrass growth parameters of quality, clipping weights, or root weights.

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C. Scott, R.K. Nishimoto, and C.S. Tang

Cyperus kyllingia and Cyperus brevifolius are problematic turfgrass weeds in Hawaii. Both are closely related weed species with similar morphology and growth characteristics. C. kyllingia appears to be a more successful weed with regards to interference than C. brevifolius. Greenhouse experiments were conducted to compare the levels of interference exerted by C. kyllingia and C. brevifolius upon Cynodon dactylon turfgrass. C. kyllingia reduced the growth of C. dactylon by about 50 %, while C. brevifolius did not significantly reduce C. dactylon growth. These results correspond with the chemical profiles of C. kyllingia and C. brevifolius. Analysis has shown that C. kyllingia contains two sesquiterpenes which have been identified as potentially allelopathic components of Cyperus rotundus. C. brevifolius contains waxes and the two sesquiterpenes found in C. kyllingia are absent. This suggests that allelopathy may be the mechanism responsible for the different levels of interference exhibited by C. kyllingia and C. brevifolius, and these species may provide an important model for the study of allelopathy.

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K.L. Hays, J.F. Barber, M.P. Kenna, and T.G. McCollum

This study was conducted to determine rooting characteristics, root carbohydrate content, and performance of 10 bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] genotypes exposed to drought. A greenhouse study was conducted twice to determine root distribution and carbohydrate content throughout the soil profile during simulated drought stress. Root distribution among genotypes and accumulation of total nonstructural carbohydrate within roots differed with depths. Root mass at 30, 60, 90, and 150 cm was significantly correlated with turf quality during drought stress (r = 0.72, 0.86, 0.80, and 0.81, respectively) only for one of the two tests. Root carbohydrate distribution was not significantly correlated with turf quality for the selected bermudagrass genotypes.

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Michael T. Deaton and David W. Williams

Common bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon) and hybrid bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon var. dactylon × C. transvaalensis) often are used for athletic fields as a result of their wear tolerance and recuperative ability. A wear tolerance study was conducted May 2007 through Nov. 2008 in Lexington, KY. Plots were managed as athletic turf and simulated traffic was applied during the Kentucky high school football seasons. The cultivars Quickstand, Tifway 419, Riviera, and Yukon grown in a sand-based medium were evaluated. Trinexapac-ethyl (TE) was applied at label rates and frequencies or left untreated. Overseeding treatments were perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) at 0, 546, and 1093 lb/acre pure live seed. Traffic treatments were applied with a Brinkman traffic simulator three times per week, once each Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, without regard to soil moisture status or weather for the periods 10 Sept. to 2 Nov. 2007 and 12 Sept. to 14 Nov. 2008. In both years of the study, the main effect of cultivar was significant (P < 0.05) in traffic tolerance (‘Tifway 419’ = ‘Riviera’ > ‘Quickstand’ = ‘Yukon’). Overseeding at the medium and high rates also provided significantly greater turf cover for the coarse-textured, more open cultivars (Quickstand and Yukon) over the fine-textured, more dense cultivars (Riviera and Tifway 419). Applications of TE did not significantly improve tolerance to simulated athletic traffic in either year of the study regardless of cultivar or overseeding treatment. Within the parameters of this study, data indicate that only cultivar has significant effects on tolerance to simulated traffic on a sand-based field. Overseeding treatments for the fine-textured, more dense cultivars and TE applications on sand-based field systems had no positive significant effects on tolerance to simulated traffic.