Search Results

You are looking at 61 - 70 of 222 items for :

  • "seed quality" x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Free access

Anwar A. Khan

ACC-derived ethylene production was used as an index of seed vigor of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), cabbage [Brassica oleracea (Capitata Group)], tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), and sweet corn (Zea mays L.) seeds. Seeds were aged at 40C and 93% relative humidity over saturated solution of KH2PO4 for various times to obtain seeds of differing vigor. Naturally aged lettuce seeds, differing in vigor, were also used. Depending on the seed type, 0.25 to 2 mm ACC (saturating dose) was needed to produce maximal amounts of ethylene. Seeds in the presence of ACC produced a much larger amount of ethylene than those in the absence of ACC, the ACC-derived ethylene could be detected before germination, and ACC had no adverse effect on germination. ACC-derived ethylene production paralleled vigor loss as determined by a decrease in percentage germination over a soak period required for complete germination of nonaged seeds (16 hours for lettuce, 24 hours for cabbage, and 48 hours for tomato and sweet corn), an increase in mean germination time (determined for lettuce only), and a decrease in seedling growth (determined for snap bean only). Second degree polynomial and logarithmic equations generated for the relationship of ACC-derived ethylene production to germination or growth parameters following seed aging, provided good to excellent fit. As a vigor test, the ACC-ethylene procedure has several advantages over the non-ACC ethylene procedure: It improves the sensitivity of the test by enhancing ethylene production, permits detection of small differences in vigor, and allows detection of ethylene before germination within a few hours of soaking. Chemical name used: 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC).

Free access

Samuel Contreras, Mark A. Bennett, James D. Metzger, and David Tay

most important fresh vegetable in the country ( USDA, 2007 ). Lettuce seed quality is important because it affects seedling emergence and uniformity of growth, which is fundamental for attaining high yield and quality in a single harvest ( Smith et al

Full access

Jeffrey G. Norcini and James H. Aldrich

native wildflower seed producer each in North Carolina and Alabama. One challenge facing the industry is seed quality, which can often vary within a species and even by seed origin ( Andersson and Milberg, 1998 ; Baskin and Baskin, 1998 ) and harvest

Free access

Gokhan Hacisalihoglu and Anwar A. Khan

109 ORAL SESSION 28 (Abstr. 572–579) Fruit Set & Seed Quality–Vegetables

Free access

David W. Wolff, Daniel I. Leskovar, Mark C. Black, and Marvin E. Miller

109 ORAL SESSION 28 (Abstr. 572–579) Fruit Set & Seed Quality–Vegetables

Free access

Elaine M. Grassbaugh, Mark A. Bennett, and Andrew F. Evans

40 WORKSHOP 3 (Abstr. 656) Seed Quality Issues in Medicinal Herbs

Free access

R.O. Nyankanga and H.C. Wien

109 ORAL SESSION 28 (Abstr. 572–579) Fruit Set & Seed Quality–Vegetables

Free access

Yu Sung, Daniel J. Cantliffe, and Russell T. Nagata

109 ORAL SESSION 28 (Abstr. 572–579) Fruit Set & Seed Quality–Vegetables

Free access

D.I. Leskovar, J.C. Ward, and A. Meiri

109 ORAL SESSION 28 (Abstr. 572–579) Fruit Set & Seed Quality–Vegetables

Free access

Ming Zhang and Eric E. Roos

109 ORAL SESSION 28 (Abstr. 572–579) Fruit Set & Seed Quality–Vegetables