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Patrick Conner

grow and can reach 2 m in length by the end of the first season ( Sparks, 2005 ). Nitrogen fertility levels can have a profound effect on tree seedling growth. Shortening rotation time by maintaining high fertility is a common method of increasing

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Guihong Bi and Carolyn F. Scagel

Perennial plants can store nitrogen (N) and remobilize the stored N for new growth the next spring ( Millard, 1995 ). There is a positive correlation between the amount of stored N in perennial plant tissues and plant growth in early spring

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Lauren M. Garcia Chance, Joseph P. Albano, Cindy M. Lee, Staci M. Wolfe, and Sarah A. White

Nursery and greenhouse crop production often results in high concentrations of nutrients within production runoff. Effluent nutrient concentrations can range from 0.1 to 387 mg·L −1 nitrate-nitrogen (NO 3 -N), 0.9 to 47 mg·L −1 ammoniacal-nitrogen

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Mary Jane Clark and Youbin Zheng

to minimize NO 3 -N leachate from container-grown Forsythia HortScience 44 1833 1837 Birrenkott, B.A. Craig, J.L. McVey, G.R. 2005 A leach collection system to track the release of nitrogen from controlled-release fertilizers in container ornamentals

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Christian A. Wyenandt, Joseph R. Heckman, and Nancy L. Maxwell

through tipping fees paid by municipalities to farmers averaging $3.00/yard 3 ( Derr and Kluchinski, 1995 ). However, a potential concern with the use of municipal leaves as a soil-surface mulch in vegetable production is the high carbon to nitrogen ratio

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M. Leonard Wells and Bruce W. Wood

clearcut ( Pond et al., 2006 ). Two common fertilizer supplements to commercial orchards are nitrogen (N) and potassium (K). The lower and upper foliage sufficiency concentrations for these vary from 2.3% to 4.0% depending on the extension service

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Mary Jane Clark and Youbin Zheng

OG at 10.2 g/pot N and growing substrate EC and pH were observed in 2015 or 2016. Fig. 1 Concentration of nitrate nitrogen (NO 3 -N), ammonium-nitrogen (NH 4 -N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) during the 2015 and 2016 growing seasons in the root

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Giuseppe Colla, Carolina María Cardona Suárez, Mariateresa Cardarelli, and Youssef Rouphael

Nitrate (NO 3 – ) is the principal nitrogen (N) source for most crops and a large number of these, including vegetables, require large quantities of NO 3 – fertilizer to attain maximal yields ( Ruiz et al., 2006 ). Balancing the amount of N

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Lenny Wells

study ( Tables 1 and 2 ). Leaf N was numerically higher for treated and control trees of both cultivars in 2014 than in 2013; however, there were no statistically significant differences. Table 1. Mean leaf nitrogen (N), leaf phosphorus (P), leaf

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André Snyder, Matthew J. Morra, Jodi Johnson-Maynard, and Donald C. Thill

., 1997 ), but no studies have compared BSMs from different species as sources of nitrogen (N) for vegetable crop production. Brassicaceae seed meals contain 5% to 6% N by weight and have C:N ratios of ≈8:1 ( Gale et al., 2006 ), thus potentially serving