Search Results

You are looking at 61 - 70 of 282 items for :

  • "citrus fruit" x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Free access

Jacqueline K. Burns, Louise Ferguson, Kitren Glozer, William H. Krueger, and Richard C. Rosecrance

the olive by 2-chloroethanephosphonic acid and cycloheximide J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 95 635 640 Hartmond, U. Yuan, R. Burns, J.K. Grant, A. Kender, W.J. 2000 Citrus fruit abscission

Free access

Juan Carlos Melgar, Jill M. Dunlop, and James P. Syvertsen

Mechanical harvesting of citrus fruit for juice processing from large-scale commercial plantings in Florida has economic advantages ( Roka et al., 2008 ) over hand-harvesting, especially when adequate seasonal labor is not available ( Brown, 2005

Free access

Naveen Kumar and Robert C. Ebel

developmental signals and environmental stresses, commercially available compounds also cause abscission in plant organs ( Kossuth et al., 1978 ; Taylor and Whitelaw, 2001 ). The peel of citrus fruit consists of the colored outer flavedo and the inner white

Free access

Dafna Langgut

Mediterranean and since its exact date of arrival has been the subject of a longstanding debate, which is still ongoing. Table 1. The westward migration of citrus species. Citron ( C. medica ) The citron was the first citrus fruit to reach the Mediterranean

Open access

Coral Ortiz, Antonio Torregrosa, Enrique Ortí, and Sebastià Balasch

finger and string-based systems cannot be used with citrus fruit as part of thinning operations. Schupp et al. (2008) showed that mechanical thinning using a drum shaker could be highly effective for thinning apple trees ( Malus × domestica ) and peach

Open access

Y. Sarig and D. Nahir

Abstract

A technique is proposed based on the viscoelastic properties of citrus fruit, using the initial deformation in a creep test as indicative of fruit firmness. This method has the advantage of being simple, objective, and replicable.

Free access

Mukadder Kayum, N. Kemal Koç, and Veli-Matti Rokka

Laser flow cytometry was used to analyze nuclear DNA contents (2C values) of five genera (Severinia Ten., Atalantia Corrèa, Fortunella Swing., Poncirus Raf., and Citrus L.) taxonomically grouped in subtribe Citrinae (citrus fruit trees) of the Rutaceae. The genotypes analyzed had 2C values ranging from 0.67 pg for diploid Severinia buxifolia (Poir.) Ten. to 1.27 pg for tetraploid Hongkong Fortunella hindsii Swing. There was no significant difference in the 2C values within the sexually compatible diploid species of 11 “true citrus fruit trees” [Citrus aurantium L., C. grandis (L.) Osbeck, C. limon (L.) Burm. f., C. limonia Osbeck, C. paradisi Macf., C. reshni Hort. ex Tanaka, C. sinensis (L.) Osbeck, C. volkameriana Ten. & Pasq., Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf., and the intergeneric hybrid C. sinensis × P. trifoliata]. The species Atalantia ceylanica (Arn.) Oliv. (a “near-citrus fruit tree”), sexually incompatible with Citrus spp., had a 2C value significantly different from those of the true citrus fruit tree species. The 2C value of Severinia buxifolia (a “primitive citrus fruit tree”), another species sexually incompatible with the Citrus spp., also differed from those of some of the true citrus fruit tree species. The data largely corresponds with taxonomical differences between a) the genera Citrus and Poncirus and b) the genera Severinia and Atalantia, all assigned to subtribe Citrinae.

Free access

François Mademba-Sy, Zacharie Lemerre-Desprez, and Stéphane Lebegin

In the tropical climatic zone, the vigor observed in citrus fruit trees represents a handicap for orchard development and limits yield increase of cultivated surface area. As a result, in New Caledonia, growers often plant at very low densities (150

Open access

Irving L. Eaks

Abstract

The respiration, ethylene production and ethylene, ethyl alcohol, and acetaldehyde content of the internal atmosphere of citrus fruit increased at 20°C following exposures to chilling temperatures (0° and 5°) compared with fruit placed directly at 20°C. The increases were greater the longer the exposure and greater following exposure to 0° than following exposure to 5°. Exposure to 12.8°, a nonchilling temperature, did not elicit a stimulation of these attributes when transferred to 20°. Ethylene, ethyl alcohol, and acetaldehyde in the internal atmosphere of fruit remained at the same levels during the chilling exposures. During storage at 12.8° the acetaldehyde content in the internal atmosphere increased, but the ethylene and ethyl alcohol content did not. The chilling injury sustained by citrus fruit during storage could be evaluated by transferring samples to 20° and determining the respiratory rate, ethylene production or the volatile content in the internal atmosphere 24 hours after transfer to 20°.

Free access

I. Oiyama and S. Kobayashi

Some undeveloped seeds from mature Citrus fruit of monoembryonic diploid cultivars crossed with a tetraploid selection were observed to be polyembryonic. The multiple embryos formed a small mass the the micropylar end. Plants regenerated in vitro from the embryos in polyembryonic seeds were triploid and showed identical peroxidase banding patterns on acrylamide gels. These results indicate that the multiple embryos found in the undeveloped seed from monoembryonic diploid × tetraploid crosses are genetically identical and of zygotic origin.