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Open access

Frank J. Dainello, R. R. Heineman, and James Mulkey Jr.

Abstract

Four seedbed configurations, north-sloped, south-sloped, mid-bed trenched, and standard flat-topped beds, were evaluated for influence on plant growth, development, and yield in ‘TAM Uvalde’ muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.). The most desirable growth rate and yield pattern was produced in mid-bed trenches. This configuration significantly increased early yield. Early season yield (June harvest) was 8670 kg/ha or 48% of total yield for the mid-bed trenched treatment as compared with 7170 (38%), 4730 (32%), and 3380 kg/ha (20%), respectively, for the south-sloped, standard, and north-sloped beds.

Open access

Joseph K. Stewart and John M. Wells

Abstract

Cantaloupes treated with 135° F water for 15, 30, or 60 seconds had significantly less stem-scar mold and surface mold than melons treated with 71° water (wet check). A 30-sec immersion controlled stem-scar mold slightly better than a 15-sec immersion. The addition of 600 ppm captan to the water at 135° significantly reduced stem-scar mold and surface mold compared to the hot-water treatment alone. Alternaria, Fusarium, and Rhizopus spp. were the fungi most frequently associated with these infections. Quality was evaluated after holding the melons for 7 days at 46° plus an additional 3 days at 72°.

In 3 of the 6 tests, the hot-water treatments significantly increased suture browning of the melons compared to the wet check. The fungicide did not influence suture browning.

General appearance of the melons treated at 130°, 135° or 145° was significantly better than that of the wet check (71°) melons, because of mold control by the hot water.

Free access

Donald J. Huber

. Pech, J.C. Bouzayen, M. Latche, A. Romojaro, F. 2001a The use of ethylene-suppressed lines to assess differential sensitivity to ethylene of the various ripening pathways in cantaloupe melons Physiol. Plant. 113

Free access

Sylvie Jenni, Katrine A. Stewart, Gaétan Bourgeois, and Daniel C. Cloutier

Free access

Paula P. Chee

A procedure for the regeneration of muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) cv. Topmark via shoot organogenesis from cotyledon explants is described. The best induction medium for a morphogenic response was MS salts and vitamins medium with BA at 1.0 mg·liter-1. Further vegetative bud development was completed by transferring organogenic tissue to MS medium containing BA at 0.05 mg·liter-1 . The shoots were rooted in MS medium containing NAA at 0.01 mg·liter-1. Morphologically normal plantlets were obtained. Chemical abbreviations used: 6-benzylaminopurine (BA); indoleacetic acid (IAA); naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA).

Open access

Joseph D. Norton and D. M. Granberry

Abstract

Plant and fruit characteristics of the parents and progeny from the interspecific cross Cucumis melo L. (PI 140471) × C. metuliferus E. Mey. (PI 292190) are described. An electron microscope scan (EMS) indicated that F1 seed exhibited both the netting from C. metuliferus and the ridging from C. melo but pollen from both parents and the F1 appeared to be identical. The F1 plants had lobed leaves as in the staminate parent (C. metuliferus). Trichomes of the F1 were intermediate. The F1 consisted of light green fruit with raised dark green areas and dark green fruit. Thirteen plants with spiney fruit were found in the F2. Ribbing and netting of fruit and andromonoecious flower types occurred in F2 progeny but did not occur in either parent. Weight, flesh and rind thickness, length, and diameter of F1 and F2 fruit greatly exceeded those of either PI 140471 or C. metuliferus. Attempts to duplicate the original cross were unsuccessful due to embryo abortion except for one plant grown by embryo culture. Backcrosses of the F1 to C. metuliferus were unsuccessful in the greenhouse and field due to embryo abortion except for 1 plant produced by embryo culture.

Open access

D. M. Granberry and J. D. Norton

Abstract

Progeny from a hybridization of C. melo L. (PI 140471), a feral Cucumis melo, with the nematode-resistant African horned cucumber (C. metuliferus E. Mey.) (PI 292190) were screened for resistance to Meloidogyne incognita acrita Chitwood. Although C. metuliferus exhibited resistance, no resistance was observed in PI 140471 nor in the F2 generation after inoculation with a larval suspension having 600 larvae/ml. However, when grown in contact with chopped galled roots, certain progeny appeared to be resistant. Evaluation of egg mass production revealed that the resistant plants produced significantly fewer eggs than susceptible plants.

Open access

M. Yamaguchi, D. L. Hughes, K. B. Tyler, H. Johnson, and D. May

Abstract

Preharvest application of (2-chloroethyl)phosphonic acid (ethephon) to muskmelon (Cucumis melo L., Reticulatus group) significantly reduced the soluble solids content and the sucrose concentration of fruits harvested at the full-slip stage. Texture and flavor ratings were also reduced. During 5 days at 20°C, the flesh of fruits from treated plants softened more rapidly and was more aromatic than the fruits from untreated plants.

Open access

W. D. Pew and B. R. Gardner

Abstract

Higher yields, larger fruit size, and earlier maturity were achieved in muskmelons (Cucumis melo L.) by irrigating when soil moisture tensions at the 25-cm depth reached 50 and 75 kPa compared with tensions of 25 kPa. More fruits were culled in the wet treatment due to decay while the drier treatments produced more fruits with growth cracks. Melons from the drier treatments were higher in soluble solids. Irrigation did not affect the other storage and shipping quality factors measured. A prethinning irrigation caused restricted root development, vine growth, fruit size, and yield.