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Longxing Hu, Zehui Huang, Shuqian Liu, and Jinmin Fu

Morpho-physiological responses of two differently adapted populations of Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. and Cenchrus ciliaris L. to salt stress Pak. J. Bot. 38 1581 1588 Alshammary, S.F. Hussain, G. Qian, Y.L. 2008 Response of four warm-season grasses to

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Zhengrong Hu, Erick Amombo, Margaret Mukami Gitau, Aoyue Bi, Huihui Zhu, Liang Zhang, Liang Chen, and Jinmin Fu

tolerance in bermudagrass ( Cynodon dactylon (L). Pers.) Plant Physiol. Biochem. 71 226 234 Shi, H. Ye, T. Zhong, B. Liu, X. Chan, Z. 2014 Comparative proteomic and metabolomic analyses reveal mechanisms of improved cold stress tolerance in bermudagrass

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Matteo Serena, Bernd Leinauer, Rossana Sallenave, Marco Schiavon, and Bernd Maier

. arundinacea Schreb.) ‘Barvado’, and perennial ryegrass ( Lolium perenne L.) ‘Premier II’, and two warm-season grasses, bermudagrass ( Cynodon dactylon L. Pers.) ‘Bargusto’ and seashore paspalum ( Paspalum vaginatum O. Swartz) ‘Sea Spray’, were included in

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Kayla R. Sanders and Jeffrey S. Beasley

fertilizer source has on N and P surface runoff losses from hybrid bermudagrass ( Cynodon dactylon × C. transvaalensis ), a commonly grown turfgrass for athletic and utility sites. Materials and methods Experimental design . Two 84-d experiments were

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Luisa Martelloni, Lisa Caturegli, Christian Frasconi, Monica Gaetani, Nicola Grossi, Simone Magni, Andrea Peruzzi, Michel Pirchio, Michele Raffaelli, Marco Volterrani, and Marco Fontanelli

Literature cited Adamipour, N. Salehi, H. Khosh-khui, M. 2016 Morpho-physiological alteration in common bermudagrass [ Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] subjected to limited irrigation and light condition Adv. Hort. Sci. 30 141 149 Ascard, J. 1995 Thermal weed

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Travis Wayne Shaddox and Joseph Bryan Unruh

. Schiavon et al. (2014) investigated the influence of wetting agents on ‘Princess 77’ bermudagrass ( Cynodon dactylon ) maintained under deficit irrigation and reported that soil moisture was more uniform as a result of one of the two wetting agents tested

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Travis Wayne Shaddox and Joseph Bryan Unruh

fertilizer cycle (WFC), summer fertilizer cycle (SFC), and fall fertilizer cycle (FFC). Treatments were applied by hand to ‘Riley’s Super Sport’ (Celebration ® ) bermudagrass ( Cynodon dactylon ) grown on a Hallandale fine sand (siliceous, hyperthermic Lithic

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Wayne W. Hanna, S. Kristine Braman, and Brian M. Schwartz

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Christian M. Baldwin, A. Douglas Brede, and Jami J. Mayer

With the emergence of glyphosate-tolerant cultivars, identifying management strategies not applicable with older cultivars need to be revisited. Objectives of these research trials were to quantify the growth regulation effects following a glyphosate application and to determine the safety of tank mixing glyphosate with another herbicide, various nitrogen (N) sources, and a plant growth regulator (PGR) on a glyphosate-tolerant perennial ryegrass [PRG (Lolium perenne L.)] cultivar, Replay. In the growth regulation trial, glyphosate was applied at 0 to 1.03 lb/acre, whereas PGRs flurpimidol, trinexapac-ethyl, paclobutrazol, and trinexapac-ethyl + flurpimidol were applied at 0.50, 0.18, 0.37, and 0.09 + 0.22 lb/acre, respectively, on 15 July 2010 and 2 Aug. 2012. In the tank mixing trial, dicamba (0.50 lb/acre), urea (15 lb/acre N), and ammonium sulfate [AMS (15 lb/acre N)] were applied alone or tank mixed with glyphosate at 0 to 0.52 lb/acre. Tank mixing urea with glyphosate had minimal effect on PRG color, while adding AMS consistently improved color at the highest glyphosate rate of 0.52 lb/acre. Twenty days following a glyphosate application, only rates >0.40 lb/acre resulted in significant growth regulation compared with untreated plots. This study indicates that tank mixing glyphosate with another herbicide, a PGR, and various N sources appear safe to the glyphosate-tolerant PRG cultivar. Also, the growth regulating effects of glyphosate applications would serve as an additional benefit to annual bluegrass (Poa annua L.) control reported in previous trials.

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Kurt Steinke, David R. Chalmers, Richard H. White, Charles H. Fontanier, James C. Thomas, and Benjamin G. Wherley

rain shelter returned to its center position. Grasses evaluated in this parent study included eight cultivars of bermudagrass ( Cynodon dactylon sp.) (‘Celebration’, ‘Common’, ‘GN-1’, ‘Grimes EXP’, ‘Premier’, ‘TexTurf’, ‘TifSport’, and ‘Tifway’); seven