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Thomas A. Fretz and Elton M. Smith

Abstract

The Ohio Cooperative Extension Service and The Ohio State University sponsored a symposium December 9-10, 1977 for members of the nursery production and scientific communities to update their knowledge and exchange ideas as it related to the winter storage of woody ornamentals. The symposium participants discussed the physiology of winter storage, pre-storage practices, determining maturity and prediction of harvest dates, acclimating plants to storage, principles of common and refrigerated storage, construction and orientation of storage structures, poly-coverings, disease control, anti-transpirants, minimum-heat, thermoblankets, heat saving techniques, and future needs. A summary of the discussions as well as research ideas are presented in this report. Copies of the proceedings of the Woody Ornamentals Winter Storage Symposium can be obtained for $5.00. Persons interested should enclose a check payable to Storage Symposium to Dr. Elton M. Smith, Department of Horticulture, 2001 Fyffe Court, Columbus, Oh, 43210.

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Don C. Elfving, Stephen R. Drake, A. Nathan Reed, and Dwayne B. Visser

1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP; SmartFresh; AgroFresh, Spring House, PA) is used widely in the apple industry to control postharvest ripening and quality loss of apples in storage ( Fan et al., 1999 ; Watkins et al., 2000 ). The product is applied

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Federica Galli, Douglas D. Archbold, and Kirk W. Pomper

Poster Session 52—Postharvest Storage 21 July 2005, 1:15–2:00 p.m. Poster Hall–Ballroom E/F

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Jinmin Fu and Peter H. Dernoeden

documented. Therefore, the objectives of this field study were to quantify rates of photosynthesis (P n ) and whole plant respiration (R w ) rates as well as carbohydrate levels [i.e., water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC), storage carbohydrates (SC), and total

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Karen L.B. Gast

40 POSTER SESSION 3 (Abstr. 092-104) Postharvest Physiology/Storage/Food Science Monday, 24 July, 1:00-2:00 p.m.

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H. Brent Pemberton, Yin-Tung Wang, Garry V. McDonald, Anil P. Ranwala, and William B. Miller

40 POSTER SESSION 3 (Abstr. 092-104) Postharvest Physiology/Storage/Food Science Monday, 24 July, 1:00-2:00 p.m.

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Eleni Tsantili, Miltiadis V. Christopoulos, Constantinos A. Pontikis, Pantousis Kaltsikes, Chariklia Kallianou, and Michalis Komaitis

decreases in firmness could be magnified after processing. Among the methods developed to maintain firmness during ripening and storage of fresh fruits were those that aim to increase fruit calcium (Ca) concentration by preharvest foliar and fruit sprays

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Y.J. Yang and K.A. Lee

148 POSTER SESSION 17 (Abstr. 120–133) Postharvest Physiology/Storage/Food Science Wednesday, 26 July, 1:00–2:00 p.m.

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Celia M. Cantín, Carlos H. Crisosto, and Kevin R. Day

Plums, like other stone fruit, have a limited postharvest life. They are climacteric fruit and undergo rapid deterioration after ripening, including softening, dehydration, and decay. Commercial storage conditions [0–5 °C and 80% to 95% relative

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Bandara Gajanayake, K. Raja Reddy, Mark W. Shankle, and Ramon A. Arancibia

early season (first 20 d) has a direct and significant impact on storage root initiation and thus final yield. Sweetpotato is grown as a rain-fed crop in Mississippi and subjected to fluctuating soil moisture conditions in the field. Sweetpotato is also