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Wol-Soo Kim, Jung-An Jo, and Soon-Ju Chung

Poster Session 50—Pomology–Physiology/Plant Growth Regulators 21 July 2005, 1:15–2:00 p.m. Poster Hall–Ballroom E/F

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Wol-Soo Kim and Jung-An Jo

Poster Session 50—Pomology–Physiology/Plant Growth Regulators 21 July 2005, 1:15–2:00 p.m. Poster Hall–Ballroom E/F

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Douglas V. Shaw, Thomas R. Gordon, and Kirk D. Larson

1 Pomology Dept. 2 Plant Pathology Dept. We wish to thank Lassen Canyon Nursery for their generous assistance in conducting the nursery phases of this research.

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J. Girona, M. Mata, D.A. Goldhamer, R.S. Johnson, and T.M. DeJong

1 Present address: Institut de Recerca i Tecnologia Agroalimentàries (IRTA), Departament d'Arboricultura Mediterrània, Centre de Mas Bové, Apartat 415, 43280 REUS (Tarragona), Spain. 2 Former graduate student. Dept. of Pomology, Univ. of

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Douglas V. Shaw, W. Douglas Gubler, and John Hansen

1 Pomology Dept. 2 Plant Pathology Dept. The cost of publishing this paper was defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. Under postal regulations, this paper therefore must be hereby marked advertisement solely to indicate this fact.

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George C. Martin

1 Presented at the 87th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Horticultural Science, Tucson, Ariz., on 7 Nov. 1990. 2 Dept. of Pomology, Univ. of California, Davis.

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Douglas V. Shaw and Thomas R. Gordon

1 Pomology Dept., Univ. of California, Davis, CA 95616. 2 Plant Pathology Dept., Univ. of California, Davis, CA 95616. We thank Lassen Canyon Nursery for their generous assistance in conducting the nursery phases of this research.

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Douglas V. Shaw, W. Douglas Gubler, John Hansen, and Kirk D. Larson

1 Pomology Dept. 2 Plant Pathology Dept. The cost of publishing this paper was defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. Under postal regulations, this paper therefore must be hereby marked advertisement solely to indicate this fact.

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J.B. Tian, H.P. Guo, A. Bertaccini, M. Martini, S. Paltrinieri, and M. Pastore

Jujube (Zizyphus jujuba Mill.) witches' broom (JWB) is the most important disease in the areas of jujube cultivation in China, where it occurs every year. Micropropagated shoots of the three most important cultivars (`Lizao', `Junzao', and `Muzao') in the National Jujube Gene Pool, collected at the Pomology Institute of Shanxi province, were tested for the presence of phytoplasmas. Phytoplasma ribosomal (16Sr) general and specific primer pairs were used in direct or nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Positive results were obtained only from symptomatic micropropagated samples of `Lizao' and from phytoplasma controls. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses of PCR products with several restriction enzymes revealed that the phytoplasmas infecting the symptomatic plants belong to the 16SrRNA group V subgroup B. The positive correlation between symptoms and the presence of phytoplasmas was verified in tissue culture. Samples from apparently healthy shoots of `Junzao', `Muzao', and `Lizao' were free of phytoplasmas.

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George Fitzpatrick*, Mary Lamberts, and Eva Worden

Horticultural activities in Florida have been chronicled in many sources, including the technical literature and the popular press. One often-overlooked source is the visual images on postcards that were sold in Florida in the early years of the 20th century. Many such cards have images featuring scenes of landscape horticulture, olericulture and pomology. While dates of postmarks may not be accurate reflections of publication dates, deltiology, the study of postcards, can involve the analysis of pigments, rag content of card stock, and other measurable parameters to determine the age of particular images. The introduction, development, ascendancy and sometimes decline of certain horticultural crops in Florida are reflected in postcard images taken between the years 1908-1950. Representative images are shown of past and present plants that have been important in Florida horticulture.