Search Results

You are looking at 51 - 60 of 88 items for :

  • "ornamental plant breeding" x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Free access

Gabriela Verdugo Ramírez, Mauricio Cisternas Baez, Ursula Steinfort, Hermine Vogel, and Rosa Cueto-Ewoldt

The biogeographical position of Chile has allowed the development of a large number of endemic species, particularly geophytes, with great potential for the ornamental plant and cut flower industry (Bridgen et al., 2002). Chilean cut flowers and bulbs exported during 2014 and 2013 were valued at U.S. $5.64 and $34.5 million, respectively (ODEPA, 2015). The bulb market in particular (i.e., Zantesdechia sp., Lilium sp., and Tulipa sp.) is growing in importance, although much of the production is consumed domestically. Orchids have become one of the largest commodities in the international

Free access

Margaret R. Pooler

Ornamental flowering cherry trees (Prunus L. species) are popular landscape plants, made famous in the U.S. by the historic Tidal Basin cherries planted in Washington, DC. Although planted primarily for their spring bloom, flowering cherries are also used as street or shade trees and are valued for their fall foliage as well as ornamental bark. Approximately 1.3 million flowering cherry trees are sold each year in the U.S. with an estimated total sales of $24.8 million (NASS, 1998).

The U.S. National Arboretum has an ongoing breeding program aimed at developing new cultivars of ornamental cherry with

Full access

Xingbo Wu and Lisa W. Alexander

Hydrangea macrophylla (bigleaf hydrangea) is one of the most important floral and nursery crops worldwide. However, breeding of new bigleaf hydrangea cultivars has been hampered by a long breeding cycle and lack of genetic resources. This study investigated the genetic diversity and population structure of 82 bigleaf hydrangea cultivars using single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) originated from genotyping-by-sequencing. A total of 5803 high-quality SNPs were discovered in a bigleaf hydrangea cultivar panel. A phylogenetic analysis and analysis of molecular variance based on discovered SNPs concluded the taxonomic classification of H. macrophylla ssp. serrata as a subspecies of H. macrophylla. Principal component analysis confirmed ‘Preziosa’ as a hybrid between H. macrophylla ssp. macrophylla and H. macrophylla ssp. serrata. In addition, the cultivar Lady in Red was also found to be a hybrid between the two subspecies. The population structure analysis identified three groups among the 82 cultivars. All H. macrophylla ssp. serrata cultivars belonged to one group, and two groups were revealed within H. macrophylla ssp. macrophylla. The separation within H. macrophylla ssp. macrophylla indicated a second gene pool due to breeding efforts that have targeted similar breeding goals for bigleaf hydrangea. The discovered SNPs and the phylogenetic results will facilitate further exploitation and understanding of phylogenetic relationships of bigleaf hydrangea and will serve as a reference for hydrangea breeding improvements.

Open access

Wayne W. Hanna and Brian M. Schwartz

Pennisetum alopecuroides (L.) Spreng. is a perennial warm-season grass native to Asia and Australia that is used mainly as an ornamental in the United States. This species is frequently referred to as “fountain grass,” which can be misleading because a number of Pennisetum species use this common name designation. The Missouri Botanical Gardens (2020) website ‘Pennisetum alopecuroides’ reports that cultivars usually range in height from 0.75 to 1.5 m.

Reduced seed production in vegetatively propagated ornamentals and turfgrass is a desirable trait because it helps maintain the purity of a commercial cultivar. Seed-sterile

Free access

Marietta Loehrlein and Sandy Siqueira

Oral Session 6—Ornamental Plant Breeding Moderator: Daniel F. Warnock 18 July 2005, 4:00–6:00 p.m. Room 107

Free access

Leslie A. Blischak and Richard E. Veilleux

Oral Session 6—Ornamental Plant Breeding Moderator: Daniel F. Warnock 18 July 2005, 4:00–6:00 p.m. Room 107

Free access

Jessica Gaus, Dennis Werner, and Shyamalrau Tallury

Oral Session 6—Ornamental Plant Breeding Moderator: Daniel F. Warnock 18 July 2005, 4:00–6:00 p.m. Room 107

Free access

Rosanna Freyre

Oral Session 6—Ornamental Plant Breeding Moderator: Daniel F. Warnock 18 July 2005, 4:00–6:00 p.m. Room 107

Free access

Michael Compton

Oral Session 6—Ornamental Plant Breeding Moderator: Daniel F. Warnock 18 July 2005, 4:00–6:00 p.m. Room 107

Free access

David Shupert, David H. Byrne, and H. Brent Pemberton

Oral Session 6—Ornamental Plant Breeding Moderator: Daniel F. Warnock 18 July 2005, 4:00–6:00 p.m. Room 107