Search Results

You are looking at 41 - 50 of 675 items for :

  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Full access

C. Elizabeth Succop and Steven E. Newman

Fresh-market sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum) is in high demand from specialty produce markets and commercial restauranteurs. Many consumers are also demanding produce that has been organically grown. Three hydroponic media systems were evaluated twice over two years, rockwool slabs, perlite frames, and commercial sphagnum peat/perlite/compost medium, where the bag was laid flat on the bench. Plants grown in these systems were fertilized with nutrient solutions derived from either organic or conventional, saltbased fertilizer sources. Few differences in yield were detected between basil plants grown in the commercial medium with either fertilizer source. Total yield from plants grown in perlite with the organic fertilizer was 22% greater in the first study and 100% greater in the second study than those for plants grown with the conventional fertilizer. Plants grown in rockwool with the conventional fertilizer were 17% more productive in the first study and 46% more productive in the second study than those grown with the organic fertilizer. Taste test panelists (69%) could discern differences between samples from organically and conventionally grown basil plants, yet no preferences were shown.

Free access

Thomas H. Boyle, Lyle E. Craker, and James E. Simon

Plants of rosemary [Rosmarinus officinalis L. (Lamiaceae)] were grown in pots containing a soilless (1 sphagnum peat:1 perlite) or soil-based (1 sphagnum peat: 1 perlite:1 field soil) growing medium and fertilized with either 12N-5.2P-12.5K controlled-release fertilizer (CRF) at 9.0 g/pot; constant liquid fertilization (LF) with 20N4.3P-16.7K at 150 mg N/liter; constant LF at 150 mg N/liter, plus CRF at 4.5 g/pot; weekly LF at 150 mg N/liter; or weekly LF at 150 mg N/liter, plus CRF at 4.5 g/pot. Constant LF plus CRF generally reduced plant height and depressed shoot fresh weight relative to other fertilizer regimes. Essential oil content was highest in plants receiving weekly LF. Plants grown in the soil-based mix were shorter, shoot fresh and dry weight tended to be lower, and essential oil yield was higher when compared to plants grown in the soilless mix. Satisfactory growth was obtained in both media when rosemary plants were fertilized with 12N-5.2P-12.5K CRF at 9.0 g/pot or weekly LF with 20N<.3P-16.7K at 150 mg N/liter.

Free access

Christopher Ramcharan

176 POSTER SESSION 24 (Abstr. 860-869) Herbs

Free access

Ahmed A. Al-Badawy, Nadia M. Abdalla, Mahmoud A. Hassan, and Ahmed F. Ali

176 POSTER SESSION 24 (Abstr. 860-869) Herbs

Free access

Ahmed A. Al-Badawy, Nadia M. Abdalla, Mahmoud A. Hassan, and Ahmed F. Ali

176 POSTER SESSION 24 (Abstr. 860-869) Herbs

Free access

Mario R. Morales and James E. Simon

Free access

Yasseen Mohamed-Yasseen

176 POSTER SESSION 24 (Abstr. 860-869) Herbs

Free access

John Norelli, JoAnn Mills, and Herb Aldwinckle

In vitro–grown leaves of Malus ×domestica Borkh. cv. Royal Gala were either crush-wounded with forceps, cut, or left whole, and then inoculated with A. tumefaciens strain EHA105 (p35SGUS_INT), with and without vacuum infiltration. Transformation was quantified 13 days after inoculation by determining the rate of β-glucuronidase (GUS) activity. Leaf wounding by crushing with nontraumatic forceps significantly increased transformation when compared with cutting leaves. Vacuum infiltration of inoculum had no effect on transformation.