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Chairani Siregar

(orchid lovers) and the increasing demand for orchids by neighboring countries such as Malaysia and Brunei Darussalam. These conditions point to the urgency of the need to conserve native orchids in West Borneo. Conservancy efforts should be conducted in

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Julie Guckenberger Price, Amy N. Wright, Kenneth M. Tilt, and Robert L. Boyd

Survival of a newly transplanted tree or shrub is dependent on the development of a root system that extends into surrounding native soil. Until this occurs, the plant must rely on the water and nutrients in the transplanted container substrate

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Michael A. Schnelle

In most settings, native germplasm proves, in the worst-case scenario, to be “weedy” and, occasionally, invasive. A weed is normally defined as a plant, native or non-native, that is not valued where it is growing ( U.S. Department of Agriculture

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Iro Kokkinou, Nikolaos Ntoulas, Panayiotis A. Nektarios, and Dimitra Varela

. Plant species for either extensive or adaptive green roof systems should be preferably native and adapted to local environmental conditions. Dimopoulos et al. (2013) reported that the prolific flora of Greece consists of 5752 kinds of plant species

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Martin J. Bukovac, Paolo Sabbatini, Franco Zucconi, and Phillip G. Schwallier

. Relative frequency histograms illustrating within-year native distribution of bloom density (left) and yield (right) of a ‘Delicious’ apple tree population growing under identical environmental conditions and cultural practices. Each bloom class (1 to 10

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Katherine Brewer, Mary Hockenberry-Meyer, Susan Galatowitsch, and Stan C. Hokanson

Prairie dropseed is a North American native warm-season bunchgrass. It occupies a large geographic range across the United States, occurring from Massachusetts to Colorado and from New Mexico north into Canada [U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA

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R. Paul Schreiner and Tian Tian

grapevines. The goal of this study was to compare the effectiveness of AMF isolates that represent taxonomically diverse fungi that are native to the soil used in the study. Five isolates were compared in this study: two that were commonly amplified from

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Lee Elder and Robert Gorman

About 333 people in the Anchorage area are involved in landscaping and landscape architecture, while about 18% of all farms in Alaska are considered greenhouse and nursery farms. These greenhouse and nursery farms account for $12.7 million in annual sales and comprise 28% of total Alaska agricultural sales. Alaskan horticulture producers have little industry knowledge of landscapers' and landscape architects' demand for Alaska native plants. This survey attempted to uncover the amounts of specific native Alaska varieties of shrubs, trees, herbaceous plants, and ferns that landscapers and landscape architects used in 2004, while also asking what types of plants they would like to use if a consistent supply was established. Landscapers' and landscape architects' business activities and perceptions are also evaluated. Surveys were distributed electronically as well as by standard mail to 165 landscapers and landscape architects in the Anchorage area. An overall 12% response rate provided insight into the commercial demand for Alaska native plant varieties.

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S. Christopher Marble, Matthew T. Elmore, and James T. Brosnan

Ornamental and native grasses and grass-like species are becoming increasingly popular as landscape plants ( Dana, 2002 ; Ruter and Carter, 2000 ; Thetford et al., 2009 ). Numerous species are now widely available and can be selected to fit almost

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Daniel D. Beran, Roch E. Gaussoin, and Robert A. Masters

Native wildflowers are important components of grassland communities and low-maintenance wildflower seed mixtures. Weed interference limits successful establishment of native wildflowers from seed. Experiments were conducted to determine the influence of the imidazolinone herbicides imazethapyr, imazapic, and imazaquin on the establishment of blackeyed susan (Rudbeckia hirta L.), upright prairieconeflower [Ratibida columnifera (Nutt) Woot. and Standl.], spiked liatris [Liatris spicata (L.) Willd.], blanket flower (Gaillardia aristata Pursh.), purple coneflower [Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench.], and spotted beebalm (Monarda punctata L.). Wildflower response to the herbicide treatments was variable and appeared to be influenced by the level of weed interference. Establishment of the native wildflowers after application of imazethapyr or imazapic at 70 g·ha-1 a.i. was generally improved at sites with greater weed interference. Emergence and density of wildflowers was often reduced by imazapic in sites with low weed interference. Flower density during the second growing season was usually either improved or not reduced by either imazethapyr or imazapic. Based on these findings, imazethapyr and imazapic can reduce weed interference and improve the establishment of some native wildflowers in areas with high weed infestations. Chemical names used: (±) -2-[4,5-dihydro-4-methyl-4-(1-methylethyl)-5-oxo-1H-imidazol-2-yl]-5-methyl-3-pyridinecarboxylic acid (imazapic); 2-[4,5-dihydro-4-methyl-4-(1-methylethyl)-5-oxo-1H-imidazol-2-yl]-3-quinolinecarboxylic acid (imazaquin); 2-[4,5-dihydro-4-methyl-4-(1-methylethyl)-5-oxo-1H-imidazol-2-yl]-5-ethyl-3-pyridinecarboxylic acid (imazethapyr).