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Andrea C. Landaverde, Jacob H. Shreckhise, and James E. Altland

evaluate the effect of storage duration, storage temperature, and filtration before storage on pH, EC, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total dissolved nitrogen (TDN), and nutrient ion concentrations of PT samples of pine bark– and peat-based substrates

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Magdalena Zazirska Gabriel, James E. Altland, and James S. Owen Jr

Nursery producers create their own substrates by mixing two or more components. Components are often regional and based on available resources local to the nursery operation. Outdoor container nurseries use bark as the primary component mixed with

Open access

A. R. Mazur, T. D. Hughes, and J. B. Gartner

Abstract

Physical properties of various hardwood bark-soil mixes for containers were compared to a soil-peat-perlite mix. Bark-soil mixes containing a wide range of bark particle sizes were found to possess superior physical properties initially and remained satisfactory after a 13-month incubation period. However, bark-soil mixes were much less stable and deteriorated to a significantly greater extent. For golf greens, physical properties of hardwood bark or peat and soil and sand mixes were studied following compaction at 40 cm moisture tension. Initially, the bark mixes were superior and this was postulated to be due to a more uniform distribution of bark within the mixes. Based on the deterioration that occurred in bark-soil mixes for containers, it is concluded that use of hardwood bark in golf green mixes does not appear feasible.

Open access

Bin Wu, Runshi Xie, Gary W. Knox, Hongmin Qin, and Mengmeng Gu

Crapemyrtle bark scale [CMBS ( Acanthococcus lagerstroemiae )] is a sap-sucking hemipteran native to some Asian countries ( Kozár et al., 2013 ). Since initially detected and identified in Texas in 2004 ( Merchant et al., 2014 ), the CMBS has

Free access

Brian E. Jackson, Robert D. Wright, Jake F. Browder, J. Roger Harris, and Alex X. Niemiera

). Of these, research and development of new substrates to replace conventionally used peatmoss and pine bark (PB) substrates have increased in recent years. In addition to developing and using new substrates, much work has focused on managing fertility

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Brian E. Jackson, Robert D. Wright, and John R. Seiler

Beginning in the early 1970s, the search for organic soilless substrates for container production has been an important horticultural research topic with the introduction of hardwood and softwood barks as the primary component in nursery container

Open access

Robert D. Wright

Abstract

This study was conducted to determine the availability of N from urea applied to a pine bark container medium. Results showed that negligible amounts of urea are adsorbed to a pine bark medium compared to NH4-N. However, 71% of the urea applied was hydrolyzed to NH4 within 24 hr and 95% within 40 hr. The rapid hydrolysis would allow N from urea to be available for plant uptake or adsorption to bark soon after application, making urea an acceptable source of N for a pine bark medium.

Free access

Nastaran Basiri Jahromi, Forbes Walker, Amy Fulcher, James Altland, and Wesley C. Wright

diffusion across concentration gradients, and the interaction with bark particle exchange sites ( Hoskins et al., 2014a ). Therefore, biochar may influence nutrients leaching from a soilless substrate. Biochar can have a substantial impact on the release and

Free access

Edna Tanne, N. Shlamovitz, and P. Spiegel-Roy

Grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) explant shoots indexed forcorky-bark and rootstocks from healthy LN33 indicator plants were sterilized and maintained in vitro. When infected shoot tips were micrografted onto LN33 shoots, typical corky-bark symptoms appeared in 8 to 12 weeks. We suggest developing this method further to replace the regular, 2-year indexing procedure.

Free access

R.A. Mirabello, A.E. Einert, and G.L. Klingaman

The use of shredded bark, wood chips, and other organic mulches to conserve water and moderate soil temperatures is a common practice in landscape maintenance. Four mulch materials (cottonseed hulls, cypress pulp, pine bark, and pine straw) were examined to determine effects on plant growth and soil conditions in annual flower beds during a 1-year rotation of warm season to cool season annuals. Inhibited plant growth was observed in pine bark treatments at the conclusion of the growing season for both plantings. Effects on soil conditions were insignificant over the year-long study in pine bark treatments. To further investigate potential phytotoxic effects of pine bark and other mulch used in the initial study, a seed bioassay was performed to determine the influence of mulch extracts in solution on germination and primary root elongation.