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Magdalena Zazirska Gabriel, James E. Altland, and James S. Owen Jr

—A comparison with rockwool Acta Hort. 401 131 136 Jenkins, J.R. Jarrell, W.M. 1989 Predicting physical and chemical properties of container mixtures HortScience 24 292 295 Lea-Cox, J.D. Smith, I.E. 1997 The interaction of air-filled porosity and irrigation

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James E. Altland and Charles R. Krause

wood particle sizes, organic amendments, and sand for desired physical properties and plant growth HortScience 45 103 112 Lea-Cox, J.D. Smith, I.E. 1997 The interaction of air-filled porosity and irrigation regime on the growth of three woody perennial

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Michael R. Evans and Leisha Vance

527 10.1007/BF00056745 Bunt, A.C. 1988 Media and mixes for container grown plants Unwin Hyman London Byrne, P.J. Carty, B. 1989 Developments in the measurement of air filled porosity of peat substrates Acta Hort. 238 37 44 Choi, J.M. Nelson, P.V. 1996a

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Michael R. Evans

London Byrne, P.J. Carty, B. 1989 Developments in the measurement of air filled porosity of peat substrates Acta Hort. 238 37 44 Evans, M.R. 2004 Ground bovine bone as a perlite alternative in horticultural substrates HortTechnology 14 171 175 Evans, M

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Will Wheeler, Reagan Wytsalucy, Brent Black, Grant Cardon, and Bruce Bugbee

irrigated only at night. Irrigation cycled on for 15 s each minute to minimize ponding and allow for slow percolation of water into the soil. This slow irrigation (up to 6 h) preserved the soil structure and air-filled porosity during the trial. Each tree

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Jin-Hee Ju, Yong-Han Yoon, and Se-Young Ju

P 1 and C 1 P 1 , except for water holding capacity. By contrast, acidity, air-filled porosity, and bulk density were the greatest in C 1 P 4 ( Table 1 ). It has been suggested that a substrate with a high coir content can increase the growth of

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Crysta N. Harris, Ryan W. Dickson, Paul R. Fisher, Brian E. Jackson, and Anissa M. Poleatewich

properties differed among source 1 substrates [ P ≤ 0.05 ( Table 5 )], but not source 2 substrates. Air-filled porosity was lowest for peat:coir (29.9%) and greatest for peat:wood (37.4%), whereas peat (34.3%) and peat:fiber (34.2%) were intermediate with

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Lesley A. Judd, Brian E. Jackson, William C. Fonteno, and Jean-Christophe Domec

). The higher AS could account for an increase in root dry mass in the 20% SPW; other researchers have observed an increase in root growth with higher (around 20% to 25% by volume) air-filled porosity ( Bunt, 1961 ; Strojny and Nowak, 2004 ). Table 1

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Victoria Ann Surrage, Claudia Lafrenière, Mike Dixon, and Youbin Zheng

components ( Handreck and Black, 2002 ). Analyses were conducted using ion chromatography (DX-120; Dionex Canada Ltd., Oakville, Ontario, Canada). Total porosity (TP), container capacity (CC), and air-filled porosity (AFP) of the four growing substrates were

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Adam F. Newby, James E. Altland, Daniel K. Struve, Claudio C. Pasian, Peter P. Ling, Pablo S. Jourdan, J. Raymond Kessler, and Mark Carpenter

in five substrate mixes containing various ratios of mostly peat, composted bark, or both for over a year when used in a 5-L container, whereas growing Prunus × cisterna (Hansen) Koehne despite decreases in total porosity and air-filled porosity