Search Results

You are looking at 41 - 50 of 166 items for :

  • "Meloidogyne incognita" x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Free access

Zhen-Xiang Lu, G.L. Reighard, W.V. Baird, A.G. Abbott, and S. Rajapakse

Eighteen peach rootstock cultivars, most of Prunus persica (L.) Batsch, were screened for diagnostic random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers using synthetic decamer oligonucleotide primers. Twenty of the 80 primers were informative, and 40 amplified DNA bands from the informative primers were selected as RAPD markers. Based on combined banding patterns, all 18 rootstock cultivars were identified with only six of the 20 informative primers. Cluster analysis of the 18 peach rootstock cultivars using 40 RAPD markers produced a dendrogram of genetic relatedness in good agreement with their putative pedigrees. The first major bifurcation in the dendrogram divided these rootstock cultivars into two groups according to their resistance or susceptibility to root-knot nematodes [Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid and White) Chitwood and M. javanica (Treub) Chitwood].

Free access

Kittipat Ukoskit, Paul G. Thompson, Gary W. Lawrence, and Clarence E. Watson

The inheritance of root-knot nematode race 3 [Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid & White) Chitwood] resistance was studied in 71 progenies of the F1 backcross population produced from the resistant parent `Regal' and the susceptible parent `Vardaman'. The distribution frequency of the progenies measured on total nematode number (eggs + juveniles) indicated a bimodal distribution with a ratio of 4 resistant: 1 susceptible. Based on this phenotypic ratio, the proposed genetic model was duplex polysomic inheritance (RRrrrr = resistant). Bulk segregant analysis in conjunction with the RAPD technique was employed to identify RAPD marker linked to the root knot nematode-resistant gene. Nine of 760 random decamer primers screened showed polymorphic bands. Primer OPI51500 produced a band in the resistant bulk, but not in the susceptible bulk. Estimated recombination frequency of 0.24 between the OPI51500 marker and the root-knot nematode-resistant gene indicated linkage.

Free access

P. D. Dukes and Janice R. Bohac

There are four known physiological races of the southern root-knot nematode [Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid & White) Chitwood]. Races are designated I through 4 and their identifications are based soley on differential hosts. These race problems as related to breeding sweetpotato for resistance to attack by all races are reviewed and discussed. Data are presented showing the reactions of selected cultivar and breeding clones of sweetpotato to all four races. The reactions of races 1 and 3 are generally well—known. Races 2 and 4 apparently are spreading and becoming more numerous in the southern states where soybean and tobacco are grown. Comparative disease indices are presented showing that generally sweetpotatoes were less susceptible to races 2 and 4. However, there were some notable exceptions, for example, `Sulfur' and `Beauregard' were equally susceptible to all races. High resistances to attack by races 2 and 4 were found in `Sumor', `Nemagold', `Excel', W-241 and others.

Free access

A.G. Hunter, O.L. Chambliss, and J.C. Williams

Four southernpea (cowpea) [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] cultivars representing various combinations of resistance and susceptibility to blackeye cowpea mosaic virus (BlCMV) and southern root-knot nematode [Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid and White) Chitwood] were used to determine effectiveness of simultaneous screening of plants for resistance to both pathogens. Plants were inoculated with both pathogens simultaneously, each pathogen separately, or left uninoculated as controls. The resistance classification of the cultivars based on treatments with only one pathogen was not different from that based on the treatment with both pathogens. Virus × nematode interaction was not a significant source of variation in BlCMV symptoms and root-knot nematode galls. Simultaneous screening for both pathogens in southernpeas appears to be a feasible option.

Free access

J. A. Thies and A. Levi

Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita, M. arenaria, and M. javanica) cause severe damage to watermelon and resistance has not been identified in any watermelon cultivar. In greenhouse tests, we evaluated 265 U.S. plant introductions (PIs) for nematode resistance (based on root galling and nematode reproduction), and identified 22 PIs of Citrullus lanatus var. citroides as moderately resistant to M. arenaria race 1. In subsequent tests, these 22 PIs exhibited low to moderate resistance to M. incognita race 3 and M. arenaria race 2. Three watermelon (C. lanatus var. lanatus) cultivars (Charleston Gray, Crimson Sweet, and Dixie Lee), three C. colocynthis PIs, and four C. lanatus var. citroides PIs, all previously shown to be susceptible to M. arenaria race 1, were susceptible to M. incognita race 3 and M. arenaria race 2. The C. lanatus var. citroides PIs that are most resistant to both M. incognita and M. arenaria should be useful sources of resistance for developing root-knot nematode resistant watermelon cultivars.

Free access

Howard F. Harrison, Judy A. Thies, Richard L. Fery, and J. Powell Smith

A preliminary screening experiment was conducted to evaluate 47 cowpea [Vigna unguiculata, (L.) Walp.] genotypes for use as a weed-suppressing cover crop. Lines evaluated in this study included forage varieties, PI accessions, experimental breeding lines, and land races of unknown origin. Of these, 11 were selected for further testing on the basis of vigorous growth and weed-suppressing ability. In a field experiment repeated over 4 years, the selected genotypes were not different from the leading cover crop cultivar, `Iron Clay', in biomass production. Vigor ratings, vine growth ratings, and canopy widths of some genotypes exceeded those of `Iron Clay'. Vigor ratings and canopy measurements were efficient selection criteria that could be useful for breeding cover crop cowpea cultivars. All selections except an African cultivar, `Lalita', were highly resistant to southern root knot nematode [Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid and White) Chitwood], and the genotypes varied in seed size, photoperiod, and response to diseases.

Free access

Howard F. Harrison, Judy A. Thies, Richard L. Fery, and J. Powell Smith

A preliminary screening experiment was conducted to evaluate 47 cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] genotypes for use as a weed-suppressing cover crop. Of these, 11 were selected for further testing on the basis of vigorous growth and weed-suppressing ability. In a field experiment repeated over 4 years, the selected genotypes were not different from the leading cover crop cultivar `Iron Clay' in biomass production. Vigor ratings, vine growth ratings, and canopy widths of some genotypes exceeded those of `Iron Clay' Vigor ratings and canopy measurements were efficient selection criteria that could be useful for breeding cover crop cowpea cultivars. All except one selection were highly resistant to southern root knot nematode [Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid and White) Chitwood], and the selections varied in seed size, photoperiod, and response to foliar diseases.

Free access

Freddi A. Hammerschlag, Ghazala Hashmi, Robin Huettel, Dennis Werner, and David Ritchie

One approach for obtaining useful genetic variation is to select for somaclonal variants generated by tissue culture techniques. Increased levels of resistance to bacterial leaf spot (Xanthomonas campestris pv. pruni) have been observed in toxin-selected and unselected peach regenerants in vitro, in the greenhouse and under field conditions. Peach regenerants have also demonstrated increased levels of bacterial canker (Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae) and root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) resistance. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) primers have been used to study genetic variation at the DNA level among the somaclonal variants. Sixty RAPD primers (10-mers) were screened and 10 proved useful as markers to detect polymorphisms, thus establishing a genetic basis for somaclonal variation. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of using tissue culture techniques to generate fruit trees with increased levels of disease resistance.

Free access

Mwamburi Mcharo*, Don Labonte, Chris Clark, and Mary Hoy

Using two sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam) F1 populations from diverse environments we investigated the AFLP marker profiles of the genotypes for association studies between the molecular markers and southern root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) resistance expression. Population one consisted of 51 half-sib genotypes developed at the Louisiana State Univ. AgCenter. The second population consisted of 51 full-sibs developed by the East African and International Potato Center sweetpotato breeding programs. Results for nematode resistance expression indicate a binomial distribution among the genotypes. Using analysis of molecular variance, logistic regression and discriminant analysis, AFLP markers that are most influential with respect to the phenotypic trait expression were selected for both populations. A comparative analysis of the power of models from the two statistical models for southern root-knot nematode resistance class prediction was also done. The diversity and possible universal similarity of influential markers between the two populations and the expected impact in sweetpotato breeding programs will be discussed.

Full access

Nancy Kokalis-Burelle, C.S. Vavrina, M.S. Reddy, and J.W. Kloepper

Greenhouse and field trials were performed on muskmelon (Cucumis melo) and watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) to evaluate the effects of six formulations of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) that have previously been shown to increase seedling growth and induce disease resistance on other transplanted vegetables. Formulations of Gram-positive bacterial strains were added to a soilless, peat-based transplant medium before seeding. Several PGPR treatments significantly increased shoot weight, shoot length, and stem diameter of muskmelon and watermelon seedlings and transplants. Root weight of muskmelon seedlings was also increased by PGPR treatment. On watermelon, four PGPR treatments reduced angular leaf spot lesions caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. lachrymans, and gummy stem blight, caused by Didymella bryoniae, compared to the nontreated and formulation carrier controls. One PGPR treatment reduced angular leaf spot lesions on muskmelon compared to the nontreated and carrier controls. On muskmelon in the field, one PGPR treatment reduced root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) disease severity compared to all control treatments.