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S. Severmutlu, N. Mutlu, R.C. Shearman, E. Gurbuz, O. Gulsen, M. Hocagil, O. Karaguzel, T. Heng-Moss, T.P. Riordan, and R.E. Gaussoin

Warm-season turfgrasses are grown throughout the warm humid, sub-humid, and semiarid regions. The objective of this study was to determine the adaptation of six warm-season turfgrass species and several of their cultivars to Mediterranean growing conditions of Turkey by evaluating turfgrass establishment rate, quality, color, and percentage of turfgrass cover. Information of this nature is lacking and would be helpful to turfgrass managers and advisers working in the region. A study was conducted over a 2-year period in two locations of the Mediterranean region of Turkey. The warm-season turfgrass species studied were bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon), buffalograss (Buchloë dactyloides), zoysiagrass (Zoysia japonica), bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum), seashore paspalum (Paspalum vaginatum), and centipedegrass (Eremochloa ophiurioides). Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) was included as a cool-season turfgrass species for comparison. Twenty cultivars belonging to these species were evaluated for their establishment, turfgrass color and quality, spring green-up, and fall color retention. Bermudagrass, bahiagrass, and seashore paspalum established 95% or better coverage at 1095 growing degree days [GDD (5 °C base temperature)], buffalograss and centipedegrass at 1436 GDD, and ‘Zenith’ and ‘Companion’ Zoysiagrass had 90% and 84% coverage at Antalya after accumulating 2031 GDD. ‘Sea Spray’ seashore paspalum; ‘SWI-1044’, ‘SWI-1045’, ‘Princess 77’, and ‘Riviera’ bermudagrass; ‘Cody’ buffalograss; and ‘Zenith’ zoysiagrass exhibited acceptable turfgrass quality for 7 months throughout the growing season. ‘Argentine’ and ‘Pensacola’ bahiagrass; ‘Sea Spray’ seashore paspalum; and ‘SWI-1044’ and ‘SWI-1045’ bermudagrass extended their growing season by retaining their green color 15 days or longer than the rest of the warm-season cultivars and/or species in the fall. The warm-season species stayed fully dormant throughout January and February. Zoysiagrass and buffalograss cultivars showed early spring green-up compared to the other warm-season species studied. Results from this study support the use of warm-season turfgrass species in this Mediterranean region, especially when heat stress and water limitations exist. Tall fescue did not survive summer heat stress necessitating reseeding in fall.

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Ross C. Braun, Jack D. Fry, Megan M. Kennelly, Dale J. Bremer, and Jason J. Griffin

In the transitional climates, warm-season turfgrasses are more heat and drought resistant and require fewer pesticide and fertilizer inputs than cool-season turfgrasses, but an extended winter dormancy period in warm-season turfgrasses makes them less attractive. Our objective was to evaluate color intensity and persistence of colorants applied at two volumes, once or sequentially, on buffalograss (Buchloe dactyloides) maintained at 2.5 inches and zoysiagrass (Zoysia japonica) maintained at 0.5 inch. Field studies were conducted in Manhattan, KS, and Haysville, KS, from Oct. 2013 to May 2014 on dormant ‘Sharpshooter’ and ‘Cody’ buffalograss and ‘Meyer’ zoysiagrass. The colorants Green Lawnger, Endurant, and Wintergreen Plus were applied at 100 or 160 gal/acre in autumn (single application) or autumn plus midwinter (sequential application). Every 2 weeks, visual turf color was rated on a 1 to 9 scale (9 = best) with ratings based on the intensity of the color, not the color (hue) of green. Few differences in color persistence occurred among colorants, but color persisted longer at the higher spray volume. In general, buffalograss receiving a single autumn colorant application had acceptable color (i.e., a visual rating ≥6) for 55–70 days at 100 gal/acre or 55–88 days at 160 gal/acre. Zoysiagrass receiving a single autumn colorant application had acceptable color for 56–97 days at 100 gal/acre or 97–101 days at 160 gal/acre. Across all sites, a sequential midwinter application applied at 160 gal/acre on buffalograss and both application volumes on zoysiagrass provided acceptable green turf color from that point until spring green-up. Most buffalograss plots receiving the sequential midwinter application at 100 gal/acre had acceptable color from that point until spring green-up. Winter color of buffalograss and zoysiagrass can be enhanced by colorant application, and a longer period of acceptable color can be achieved by applying at a higher volume or by including a sequential midwinter treatment.

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J. Ryan Stewart, Roger Kjelgren, Paul G. Johnson, and Michael R. Kuhns

Although transplanted trees typically establish and grow without incident in frequently irrigated turfgrass, their performance in precisely irrigated turfgrass in an arid climate is not known. We investigated the effect of precision irrigation scheduling on growth and water relations of balled-and-burlapped littleleaf linden (Tilia cordata Mill. `Greenspire') planted in buffalograss (Buchloë dactyloides [Nutt.] Engelm. `Tatanka') and kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.). Over 2 years, trees in turfgrass were irrigated either by frequent replacement based on local reference evapotranspiration, or precision irrigated by estimating depletion of soil water to the point of incipient water stress for each turfgrass species. Predawn leaf water potential and stomatal conductance of trees were measured during first-year establishment, and predawn leaf water potential was measured during a mid-season water-deficit period during the second year. Trunk diameter growth and total tree leaf area were measured at the end of each year. Values of predawn leaf water potential and stomatal conductance of trees in precision-irrigated buffalograss were lower (–0.65 MPa, 25.3 mmol·m–2·s–1) than those of trees in the other treatments near the end of the first growing season. The longer interval between precision irrigations resulted in mild water stress, but was not manifested in growth differences among trees across treatments during the first season. During the water-deficit period of the second year, there was no evidence of stress among the trees regardless of treatment. At the end of the second season, total leaf area of trees grown in precision-irrigated kentucky bluegrass (1.10 ± 0.34 m2) was 46% of that of trees grown in buffalograss (2.39 ± 0.82 m2) that were irrigated frequently. Trunk diameter growth of trees in frequently irrigated kentucky bluegrass (1.91 ± 2.65 mm) was 29% of that of the trees grown in buffalograss (6.68 ± 1.68 mm), regardless of irrigation treatment, suggesting a competition effect from kentucky bluegrass. We conclude that frequent irrigation of balled-and-burlapped trees in turfgrass, particularly buffalograss, is more conducive to tree health during establishment than is maximizing the interval between turfgrass irrigation. Regardless of irrigation schedule, kentucky bluegrass appears to impact tree growth severely during establishment in an arid climate.

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Peter A. Dotray and Cynthia B. McKenney

Experiments were conducted to evaluate established and seeded buffalograss [Buchloe dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm.] tolerance to herbicides applied preemergence at labeled use rates. Established buffalograss tolerated benefin, benefin plus oryzalin, benefin plus trifluralin, DCPA, dithiopyr, isoxaben, oryzalin, pendimethalin, and prodiamine. For established buffalograss treated with atrazine, diuron, or metolachlor, the injury rating was 27% to 71% at 6 weeks after treatment (WAT) and 22% to 84% at 15 WAT. Buffalograss tolerated cyanazine, metsulfuron, propazine, and pyrithiobac applied in the seedbed. Seeded buffalograss stands were reduced by alachlor, atrazine, dicamba, linuron, metolachlor, metribuzin, oryzalin, pendimethalin, and quinclorac. Stand reductions by dicamba (a preplant and postemergence herbicide), up to 100% at 4 WAT and up to 85% at 16 WAT, were those most severe. Seeded and established buffalograss showed excellent tolerance to a few preemergence herbicides that could be used effectively and safely to control weeds during establishment and maintenance of buffalograss. Chemical names used: 2-chloro-N-(2,6-diethylphenyl)-N-(methoxymethyl) acetamide (alachlor); 6-chloro-N-ethyl-N′-(1-methylethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (atrazine); N-butyl-N-ethyl-2,6-dinitro-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzenamine (benefin); 2-[[4-chloro-6-(ethylamino)-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl]amino]-2-methylpropanenitrile (cyanazine); dimethyl 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-1,4-benzenedicarboxylate (DCPA); 3,6-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid (dicamba); S,S-dimethyl 2-(difluoromethyl)-4-(2-methylpropyl)-6-(trifluoromethyl)-3,5-pyridinedicarbothioate (dithiopyr); N′-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-N,N-dimethylurea (diuron); N-[3-(1-ethyl-1-methylpropyl)-5-isoxazolyl]-2,6-dimethoxybenzamide (isoxaben); N′-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-N-methoxy-N-methylurea (linuron); 2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl)acetamide (metolachlor); 4-amino-6-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-3-(methylthio)-1,2,4-triazin-5(4H)-one (metribuzin); 2-[[[[(4-methoxy-6-methyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)amino]carbonyl]amino]sulfonyl]benzoic acid (metsulfuron); 4-(dipropylamino)-3,5-dinitrobenzenesulfonamide (oryzalin); N-(1-ethylpropyl)-3,4-dimethyl-2,6-dinitrobenzenamine (pendimethalin); N 3,N 3-di-n-propyl-2,4-dinitro-6-(trifluoromethyl)-m-phenylenediamine (prodiamine); 6-chloro-N,N′-bis(1-methylethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (propazine); 2-chloro-6-[(4,6-dimethoxy-2-pyrimidinyl) thio]benzoic acid (pyrithiobac); 3,7-dichloro-8-quinolinecarboxylic acid (quinclorac); Team™ [premix of 1.33% benefin and 0.67% 2,6-dinitro-N,N-dipropyl-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzenamine] (trifluralin).

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Katherine Kreuser, William C. Kreuser, Gautam Sarath, and Keenan L. Amundsen

Buffalograss [ Buchloë dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm. Syn. Bouteloua dactyloides (Nutt.) Columbus], a dioecious, warm-season grass native to the U.S. plains region, is touted for characteristics like drought tolerance, winterhardiness, and requiring

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Stephen E. McCann and Bingru Huang

species such as buffalograss [ Buchloe dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm.], seashore paspalum ( Paspalum vaginatum Swartz), and tall fescue ( Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) have been found to exhibit drought avoidance characteristics associated with enhanced

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Sheng Wang, Qi Zhang, and Eric Watkins

of buffalograss ( Buchloe dactyloides ), another native grass with similar ideal characteristics of xeriscaphytic turf ( Riordan and Browning, 2003 ). Low-input turfgrass must meet visual and functional requirement under minimum care. Salinity is a

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Maria P. Fuentealba, Jing Zhang, Kevin E. Kenworthy, John E. Erickson, Jason Kruse, and Laurie E. Trenholm

bermudagrass [ C. dactylon (L.) Pers. var. dactylon ], and ‘Prairie’ buffalograss [ Buchloe dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm.] when grown in a greenhouse in calcined clay. This study was in accordance with Carrow (1996b) , who documented similar results when

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Vanina Cravero, Eugenia Martín, and Enrique Cointry

mapping and gene tagging in Brassica oleracea L. ( Li and Quiros, 2001 ), Cucurbita moschata (Duchesne ex Lam.) Duchesne ex Poir ( Ferriol et al., 2004 ), and Buchloe dactyloides (Nutt.) Englem. ( Budak et al., 2004 ). It targets coding sequences and

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Ross Braun, Jack Fry, Megan Kennelly, Dale Bremer, and Jason Griffin

, AZ, and Paradise Valley, AZ, respectively, increased canopy temperatures up to 10.2 °F in January ( Whitlark, 2012 ; Whitlark and Umeda, 2012 ). Buffalograss ( Buchloe dactyloides ) treated in December with Lesco Green (John Deere Landscapes