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Cecilia Rubert Heller and Gerardo H. Nunez

rhizoboxes. Photos were used to measure the leaf area index (LAI) using ImageJ software version 1.51w (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD). Leaf greenness [soil plant analysis development (SPAD)] was measured on the youngest fully expanded leaf of

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Craig Brodersen, Cody Narciso, Mary Reed, and Ed Etxeberria

ImageJ (< http://imagej.nih.gov/ij >). Results The general anatomy of phloem tissue in healthy citrus trees consists of a ring of compact cells delimited by the distinctively larger xylem vessels to the interior and by thick-walled fibers along the

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He Li and Donglin Zhang

were photographed 8 weeks after culture for seedling growth analysis. Number of true leaf and total leaf area were measured using ImageJ 1.x ( Fig. 1D ; Schneider et al., 2012 ). Data were analyzed by analysis of variance and GLM program in SAS

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Pablo Bolaños-Villegas, Shih-Wen Chin, and Fure-Chyi Chen

images involved use of ImageJ software, a public domain image analysis application ( U.S. National Institutes of Health, 2007 ). Final image adjustment involved use of Adobe Photoshop CS2 (Adobe Systems, San Jose, CA). Fluorescent staining. To

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Yin Xu, Yizhou Ma, Nicholas P. Howard, Changbin Chen, Cindy B.S. Tong, Gail Celio, Jennifer R. DeEll, and Renae E. Moran

even surface spanning 10 or more cells. Cuticle, epidermal, and hypodermal thicknesses, as well as epidermal and hypodermal cell widths were measured for 8–10 cells per image using ImageJ software version 1.48 ( Schneider et al., 2012 ). For scanning

Open access

James M. Orrock, Brantlee Spakes Richter, and Bala Rathinasabapathi

software (ImageJ 1.8.0; National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD). Data were analyzed to test differences between means using analysis of variance followed by Tukey’s honestly significant difference method in statistical analysis software (JMP for

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Keun H. Cho, Veronica Y. Laux, Nathan Wallace-Springer, David G. Clark, Kevin M. Folta, and Thomas A. Colquhoun

randomly from the pictures to determine RGB values using the ImageJ (1.50i) program ( http://imagej.nih.gov/ij ). The RGB values were converted into the CIELAB (International Commission on Illumination L* a* b* scale) system using color converter software

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Ángel V. Domínguez-May, Mildred Carrillo-Pech, Felipe A. Barredo-Pool, Manuel Martínez-Estévez, Rosa Y. Us-Camas, Oscar A. Moreno-Valenzuela, and Ileana Echevarría-Machado

hair were determined using National Institutes of Health (NIH) ImageJ software ( Schneider et al., 2012 ). Three PRs per treatment were processed and these data were confirmed by the images from the cleared roots (five roots per treatment) using the

Open access

S. Brooks Parrish and Zhanao Deng

accession. Five fields of view were observed for each leaf to estimate the stomata density (no./mm 2 ). Stomata length and width were measured on three leaves per accession and 10 stomata per leaf using ImageJ (version 1.53e; National Institutes of Health

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David Gopaulchan, Adrian M. Lennon, and Pathmanathan Umaharan

(Pierce Protein Research Products). Images of blots were acquired with the UVP Gel/Doc-It 300 imaging system with UV to White Light Converter (UVP, Upland, CA) and protein band intensities were estimated using ImageJ 1.46r ( Schneider et al., 2012 ). Due