Search Results

You are looking at 31 - 40 of 243 items for :

  • "southern highbush blueberry" x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Free access

Bruno Casamali, Rebecca L. Darnell, Alisson P. Kovaleski, James W. Olmstead, and Jeffrey G. Williamson

.001), but there was no difference in canopy volume of grafted vs. own-rooted ‘Farthing’ (≈0.99 m 3 , P = 0.520). Table 1. Effect of root and soil treatments on canopy volume of ‘Farthing’ and ‘Meadowlark’ southern highbush blueberry from 2012 to 2014

Free access

Bruno Casamali, Jeffrey G. Williamson, Alisson P. Kovaleski, Steven A. Sargent, and Rebecca L. Darnell

quality Appl. Eng. Agr. 12 21 26 Casamali, B. Darnell, R.L. Kovaleski, A.P. Olmstead, J.W. Williamson, J.G. 2016 Vegetative and reproductive traits of two southern highbush blueberry cultivars grafted onto Vaccinium arboreum rootstocks HortScience 51 880

Free access

Yang Fang, Jeffrey Williamson, Rebecca Darnell, Yuncong Li, and Guodong Liu

). However, these studies used the midseason NHB cultivar ‘Bluecrop’. Southern highbush blueberry ( V. corymbosum L. interspecific hybrid) cultivars that are adapted to Florida’s mild winter climate ripen fruit earlier in the season and have a longer

Full access

Gregory A. Lang and Jiaxun Tao

The postharvest performance of early ripening southern highbush blueberries `Sharpblue' and `Gulfcoast' was evaluated under storage and simulated retail conditions. In general, `Gulfcoast' fruit were 28% heavier than those of `Sharpblue', which had a higher percent soluble solids concentration (SSC) and lower titratable acidity (TA). Quality loss, as indexed by fresh weight, percent decayed fruit, or changes in SSC, pH, or TA, was insignificant in first-harvest fruit of either cultivar when kept in storage (2C) for up to 7 days. Transfer of fruit stored at 2C for 3 days to simulated retail conditions at 21C for 4 days significantly increased fresh weight loss and decay, but not beyond levels deemed unmarketable. Second-harvest fruit were smaller than first-harvest fruit, and those of `Sharpblue' fruit were more prone to decay. However, storage quality of both cultivars was acceptable through 11 days at 2C. Retail quality, as influenced by decay incidence, was acceptable after 3 days at 2C plus 4 days at 21C, but not after 3 days at 2C plus 8 days at 21C. Overall, fruits of these early ripening southern highbush blueberry cultivars performed well under postharvest conditions and are suitable for expanding production of premium fresh blueberries by growers in the Gulf coastal plains.

Free access

D. Scott NeSmith

Southern highbush blueberries ( Vaccinium corymbosum L.) continue to gain a significant share of the production acreage of commercial blueberries in Georgia. One of the major interests in the species is early-ripening berries, especially around 1

Free access

D. Scott NeSmith

Southern highbush blueberries (interspecific hybrids containing mostly Vaccinium corymbosum L.) continue to gain a significant share of the production acreage of commercial blueberries in Georgia. A major reason for the interest in the species has

Free access

J.M. Spiers

A field study was conducted to evaluate individual and collective influences of three soil moisture-supplementing practices (irrigation, incorporated peatmoss, and mulching) on root system development in `Gulfcoast' southern highbush blueberries. Root growth was least in plants not mulched and greatest in plants receiving all three supplements. Ranking of individual treatments on root dry weight production was mulch > incorporated peatmoss = irrigation. Mulching resulted in uniform root distribution from the plant crown outward and in root growth concentrated in the upper 15 cm of soil. Other practices (peatmoss > irrigation) tended to concentrate the root system near the crown area and resulted (peatmoss = irrigation) in greater root depth. Soil moisture appeared to be the major factor influencing root distribution.

Free access

John R Clark and J.N. Moore

Blue Ridge, Cape Fear, Georgiagem, and O Neal southern highbush blueberry cultivars were grown for 5 years on a fine sandy loam soil in a comparison of plants either mulched with uncomposted pine sawdust and woodchips or nonmulched. Other cultural practices were identical and all plants received the same amount of trickle irrigation. A significant mulch × cultivar interaction for yield and mulch × plant age interactions for yield, individual berry weight, and plant volume were found. Cape Fear was the highest-yielding mulched cultivar, followed by Blueridge, Georgiagem, and O Neal. Mulched plants had higher yields and produced larger plants. Average individual berry weight was greater for mulched plants in the first year of harvest, but not different among treatments in other years. The data reveal that these southern highbush cultivars performed similar to northern highbush (Vaccinicum corymbosum L.) in their need for mulching for adequate production on upland soils.

Free access

D. Scott NeSmith

Southern highbush blueberries (interspecific hybrids containing mostly Vaccinium corymbosum L.) continue to gain a significant share of the production acreage of commercial blueberries in Georgia. A major reason for the interest in the species has

Free access

James M. Spiers

In a 1989 field study, `Gulfcoast' southern highbush blueberry plants were subjected to irrigation [8 liters per week (low) and 30 liters per week (high)], mulching (none and 15 cm height), row height (level and raised 10-15 cm), and soil incorporated peat (none and 15 liters in each planting hole) treatments at establishment. Plants were grown on a well-drained fine sandy loam soil that contained < 1.0% organic matter. Plant volume was increased by either mulching, high irrigation, incorporated peat moss or level beds. Fruit yields were not significantly affected by irrigation levels but were highest with either mulching, level beds or incorporated peat moss. The bed height X mulching interaction indicated that mulching increased yield more with level beds than with raised beds. Plants grown with the combination of mulching, level beds, incorporated peat moss, and high irrigation levels yielded 1.1 kg per plant or approximately 10 times more than plants grown without mulch, with raised beds, without peat moss, and with the low rates of irrigation. Of the 4 establishment practices evaluated, mulching had the greatest influence on plant growth and fruiting.