Search Results

You are looking at 31 - 40 of 85 items for :

  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Free access

Zhanao Deng, Brent K. Harbaugh, and Natalia A. Peres

Caladiums ( Caladium × hortulanum Birdsey, Araceae Juss.) are valued for their colorful and variably shaped leaves ( Harbaugh and Tjia, 1985 ; Wilfret, 1993 ). Commercial caladium cultivars generally are grouped into the fancy- or lance

Free access

Zhanao Deng and Brent K. Harbaugh

Cultivated caladiums ( Caladium × hortulanum Birdsey) are valued for their bright colorful leaves ( Evans et al., 1992 ). They can be broadly classified into three groups based on leaf shape: fancy, lance, and strap ( Deng and Harbaugh, 2006

Free access

Zhanao Deng and Brent K. Harbaugh

Caladiums ( Caladium ×hortulanum Birdsey, Araceae Juss.) are ornamental aroids commonly used as container and landscape plants ( Evans et al., 1992 ; Harbaugh and Tjia, 1985 ). They are valued for bright colorful leaves and low

Free access

William J. Carpenter

Caladium hortulanum Birdsey cv. Candidum seed failed to germinate without light; maximum germination required daily, incandescent light of ≤4 hours. Lengthening daily lighting periods progressively reduced the days to 50% relative germination (T50) from 20 to 8, and days between 10% and 90% relative germination (T90 – T10) from 16 to 5. T50 and T90 – T10 were shortest (≈ 8 days) at 25 and 30C, while total or absolute germination percentage (G) was highest at ≈ 90%. G was 94% for seeds harvested immediately, but 75% or 38% for seeds that remained in fruits for 3 or 12 weeks after fruit abscission from the spadix. Total absolute germination was reduced from 95% to 87% when seed moisture contents declined to <14%. Seed storage for 7 days at from 10 to – 80 C-caused no reduction in G. Seeds were stored 6 months at 15C and 22%, 33%, or 52% RH without change in G, but storage at 5 or 25C and 11%, 75%, or 95% RH significantly reduced germination.

Open access

Brent Harbaugh

Abstract

Visual symptoms of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe and B deficiencies were induced in Caladium × hortulanum Birdsey ‘Candidum’. Characteristic symptoms were photographed and described and a key summarizing these symptoms follows:

a. Chlorosis or necrosis not expressed;

b. Petioles brittle and/or leaves orbicular.........................................................................................................................B

bb. Plants grow slowly, but have no other symptoms......................................................................................................P

bbb. Rust colored spots on underside of leaf near petiole, spots may become “windows” (only the cuticle and epidermal layer remain)................................................................................................................................................. Ca

aa. Chlorosis and/or necrosis expressed;

b. Chlorosis primary symptom.

c. Interveinal and veinal chlorosis

d. Chlorosis evident as leaves unfurl............................................................................................................... Mn

dd. Chlorosis not evident as leaves unfurl, older leaf blades and veins may turn bright yellow as they abscise................................................................................................................................................................... N

cc. Interveinal chlorosis...................................................................................................................................................Fe

bb. Both chlorosis and necrosis expressed.

c. Interveinal chlorosis developing into necrotic spots, leaves turn bright yellow (except basal veins remain green) as they abscise............................................................................................................................................. Mg

cc. Necrotic specks (@ 1 mm) near veins, general chlorosis............................................................................... Mn

bbb. Necrosis primary symptom.

c. Necrotic lesions (2–5 cm) on leaf apex and distal m argin.................................................................................K

cc. Marginal necrosis.

d. Necrosis spreads toward the center of the leaf, margins dry but the leaf blade around petiole remains intact.......................................................................................................................................................................K

dd. Interveinal rust colored, blotchy areas.........................................................................................................Ca

Free access

Zhanao Deng, Brent K. Harbaugh, and Natalia A. Peres

Caladiums ( Caladium × hortulanum Birdsey, Araceae Juss.) are commonly grown in pots, hanging baskets, and other container types, or planted in the landscape as accent and border plants ( Evans et al., 1992 ). They are valued for a wide array of

Free access

Zhanao Deng, Jinguo Hu, Fahrettin Goktepe, Brady A. Vick, and Brent K. Harbaugh

Cultivated caladiums are valued for their bright colorful leaves and are widely used in containers and landscapes. More than 1500 named cultivars have been introduced during the past 150 years, yet currently only about 100 cultivars are in commercial propagation in Florida. Caladium tubers produced in Florida account for 95% of the world supplies. Loss of caladium germplasm or genetic diversity has been a concern to future improvement of this plant. In addition, the relationship among the available cultivars, particularly those of close resemblance, has been lacking. This study was conducted to assess the genetic variability and relationship in commercial cultivars and species accessions. Fifty-seven major cultivars and 15 caladium species accessions were analyzed using the target region amplification polymorphism marker technique. This marker system does not involve DNA restriction or adaptor linking, but shares the same high throughput and reliability with the amplified fragment length polymorphism system (AFLP). Eight primer combinations amplified 379 scorable DNA fragments among the caladium samples. A high level of polymorphism was detected among the species accessions as well as among cultivars. These markers allowed differentiation of all the cultivars tested, including those hardly distinguishable morphologically. Clustering analysis based on these DNA fingerprints separated the cultivars into five clusters and Caladium lindenii far from other caladium species. The availability of this information will be very valuable for identifying and maintaining the core germplasm resources and will aid in selecting breeding parents for further improvement.

Free access

Zhanao Deng and Brent K. Harbaugh

The ornamental value of caladium (Caladium ×hortulanum Birdsey) depends primarily on leaf characteristics, including leaf shape and main vein color. Caladium leaf shapes are closely associated with plant growth habit, stress tolerance, and tuber yield; leaf main vein colors are often used for cultivar identification. Thirty-eight crosses were made among 10 cultivars and two breeding lines; their progeny were analyzed to understand the inheritance of leaf shape and main vein color and to determine if there is a genetic linkage between these two traits. Results showed that a single locus with three alleles determined the main vein color in caladium. The locus was designated as V, with alleles V r, V w, and V g for red, white, and green main veins, respectively. The white vein allele was dominant over the green vein allele, but it was recessive to the red vein allele, which was dominant over both white and green vein alleles; thus the dominance order of the alleles is V r > V w > V g. Segregation data indicated that four major red-veined cultivars were heterozygous with the genotype Vr V g, and that one white-veined cultivar was homozygous and one other white-veined cultivar and one breeding line were heterozygous. The observed segregation data confirmed that the three leaf shapes in caladium were controlled by two co-dominant alleles at one locus, designated as F and f, for fancy and strap leaves, respectively. The skewedness of leaf shape segregation in some of the crosses implied the existence of other factors that might contribute to the formation of leaf shape. Contingency chi-square tests for independence revealed that caladium leaf shape and main vein color were inherited independently. The chi-square tests for goodness-of-fit indicated that the five observed segregation patterns for leaf shape and main vein color fit well to the expected ratio assuming that two co-dominant and three dominant/recessive alleles control leaf shape and main vein color and they are inherited independently.

Free access

Baldwin D. Miranda, G.J. Wilfret, and B.K. Harbaugh

This research was supported by the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station and grants from the Gloeckner Foundation and the Florida Caladium Growers Association, and approved for publication as Journal Series R-08378.

Free access

Zhanao Deng and Brent K. Harbaugh

This research was supported by the Florida Agricultural Expt. Station and grants from the Florida Caladium Growers Association and the Gloeckner Foundation. We thank Richard Kelly, Nancy West, Joyce Jones and Gail Bowman for their excellent