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Rachel E. Rudolph, Carl Sams, Robert Steiner, Stephen H. Thomas, Stephanie Walker, and Mark E. Uchanski

crops should also be a non-host for nematodes or able to suppress nematode populations in the field. Southern RKN ( Meloidogyne incognita ), a plant–parasitic nematode, is of great concern to chile pepper growers in southern New Mexico ( Walker et al

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Tanner Donahoo, Lisha Zhang, Matthew Cutulle, and Abolfazl Hajihassani

because increased levels of resistance to root-knot nematode ( Meloidogyne incognita ) have been reported for these two cultivars ( Hajihassani et al., 2020 ). ‘Maxifort’ was selected as a rootstock because it has been reported to reduce the incidence of

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C. Stevens, V. A. Khan, A. Y. Tang, C. K. Bonsi, and M. A. Wilson

A three year study involving solar heating of soil (soil solarization) with clear polyethylene mulch demonstrated for two years, control of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita). The population of M. incognita was reduced >90% in the 0-30cm depth of solarized soil. The number of eggs per gram root recovered and the root gall index from `Georgia-Jet' sweetpotatoes were reduced (92-98%) by soil solarization. Growth and yield were enhanced in solarized soil. The beneficial effects of solarization was observed in the second year following two additional cropping cycles of collard greens and sweetpotatoes.

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Luisa Santamaria and Sherry Kitto

Solanum quitoense, also known as naranjilla or lulo, is a native species of Ecuador and Colombia. Its value is based on the uncommon sweet-sour flavor of its fruits, which is appreciated in the national and international markets. The worst problem for this crop is the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita. The main objective of our research is to develop root-knot nematode–resistant naranjilla via somaclonal variation. Seeds of Solanum quitoense `Baeza' germinated quicker than those of `Dulce'. Seeds given a 2-week dark treatment had 100% germination compared to 75% germination for seeds placed under lights (16-h photoperiod, 60 mmol·m–2s–1). Single-node explants proliferated an average of nine nodes after 1 month of culture. Microcuttings (two nodes, 3.5 cm) stuck in sand and placed under a humidity dome under mist had an average of five roots averaging 25 cm in length after 3 weeks. Stems regenerated shoots better than petioles or leaves and explant orientation/polarity had no effect on regeneration. Root cultures of Solanum quitoense inoculated in vitro with Meloidogyne incognita showed susceptibility to root-knot nematodes.

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Yan Chen, Donald Merhaut, and J. Ole Becker

Nitrogen (N) fertilization is critical for successful production of cut flowers in a hydroponic system. In this study, two sunflower cultivars: single-stand `Mezzulah' and multi-stand `Golden Cheer' were grown under two N fertilization rates: 50 mg·L-1 and 100 mg·L-1 in a recirculating hydroponic system. At the same time, `Mezzulah' sunflowers were biologically stressed by exposing each plant to 2000 second-stage juveniles of the plant parasitic nematode Meloidogyne incognita, race 1. The experiment was conducted in May and repeated in Sept. 2004, and plant growth and flower quality between control and nematode-infested plants were compared at the two N rates. The two cultivars responded differently to fertilization treatments. With increasing N rate, the dry weight of `Mezzulah' increased, while that of `Golden Cheer' decreased. Flower size and harvest time were significantly different between the two cultivars. However, N had no effect on flower quality and harvest time. Flower quality rating suggests that quality cut stems can be obtained with 50 mg·L-1 N nutrient solution. Nematode egg count suggests that plants in the nematode treatment were successfully infested with Meloidogyne incognita, however, no significant root galling was observed, and plant growth and flower quality were not affected by nematode infestation.

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J.A. Thies

Thirteen sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) genotypes were characterized for resistance to Meloidogyne incognita, M. javanica, M. hapla, and M. arenaria races 1 and 2 in greenhouse tests. The following sweetpotato genotypes representing a range of reactions to M. incognita were evaluated: U.S. Plant Introduction (PI) 399163 (highly resistant = HR), Sumor (HR), Nemagold (HR), Excel (HR), Tinian (HR), Hernandez (resistant = R), Jewel (R), Regal (R), Porto Rico (intermediate = I), Centennial (susceptible = S), Georgia Jet (S), Sulfur (S), and Beauregard (S). Meloidogyne incognita was most pathogenic to sweetpotato of the four Meloidogyne spp. evaluated in these studies. The U.S. Plant Introduction (PI) 399163 and Sumor were resistant to M. incognita in all tests. Only two genotypes, Beauregard and Porto Rico, were susceptible to M. javanica. All genotypes evaluated were resistant to M. hapla, M. arenaria race 1, and M. arenaria race 2. Sumor, U.S. PI 399163, and Nemagold appear to provide the highest levels of resistance against the four Meloidogyne spp. used in these studies. Since M. incognita is the most commonly occurring root-knot nematode species in sweetpotato growing areas of the southern U.S. and is pathogenic to most of the commonly grown sweetpotato cultivars, efforts to develop resistant cultivars that have desirable horticultural characteristics for the U.S. market should be directed toward this root-knot nematode species.

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R. Mark Hurley, Paul G. Thompson, and Gary W. Lawrence

A factorial test was conducted to evaluate the potential of screening sweetpotato plants to three pathogens simultaneously. The pathogens were Meloidogyne incognita, Fusarium oxysporum, and Streptomyces ipomoea. The test also involved six sweetpotato cultivars and three evaluation times. Evaluation times were 3, 6, and 9 weeks post inoculation. The symptoms evaluated were vascular necrosis, fibrous root necrosis, and gall and egg mass production. For each of the three pathogens, the ability to separate cultivars with intermediate levels of resistance from those with low levels of resistance decreased as post Inoculation time increased. Simultaneous screening was practical if the goal was to select plants with resistance to all three pathogens. Resistances to individual pathogens could not be identified in plants inoculated with all three pathogens.

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F.A. Hammerschlag and R.N. Huettel

Five in vitro propagated peach scion cultivars (Suncrest, Rio Oso Gem, Compact Redhaven, Redhaven, Jerseyqueen) and two rootstock (Nemaguard and Lovell) were screened in vitro and in microplots for their susceptibility to the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita. Evaluations in tissue culture for galling were conducted at 5 wk. Trees in microplots were evaluated for 3 years for nematode populations, trunk diameter, and yield. Comparative results indicated that the number and size of galls observed at 5 wk in vitro is indicative of the response of peaches to nematodes under field conditions after three years. Cultivar Compact Redhaven was significantly more tolerant to root-knot than `Lovell' the most widely used peach rootstock. These results suggest that Compact Redhaven might be potentially useful as a rootstock in the Southeast where Nemaguard is used sparingly because of its lack of cold tolerance. In addition, these results indicate that in vitro screening holds promise as a rapid technique for evaluating root-knot nematode resistance.

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Kathryn E. Brunson, Sharad C. Phatak, J. Danny Gay, and Donald R. Sumner

Velvetbean (Mucuna deeringiana L.) has been used as part of the crop rotation in low-input vegetable production in southern Georgia to help suppress populations of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) for the past 2 years. Over-wintering cover crops of crimson and subterranean clovers were used the low-input plots and rye was the plow-down cover crop in the conventional plots. Tomatoes, peppers, and eggplant were the vegetable crops grown in these production systems. Following the final harvest in 1992, use of nematicides in the low-input plots was discontinued and velvetbean was then planted into the low-input plots and disked in after 90 days. Results from the 1993–94 soil samples taken before and after velvetbean showed a continuing trend of reduced nematode numbers where velvetbean had been, while most conventional plots that had nematicides applied resulted in increases in nematode populations.

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Kathryn E. Brunson, Sharad C. Phatak, J. Danny Gay, and Donald R. Summer

Velvetbean (Mucuna deeringiana L.) was used in crop rotation to determine the influence on southern root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) in sustainable vegetable production. Replicated trials were conducted at four locations. Two cover crop treatments, crimson clover and subterranean clover, were used in the sustainable plots and rye was the plow-down cover crop for the conventional plots. Selected as the vegetable crops were tomato, pepper, and eggplant. Following the final harvest, velvetbean was planted into the sustainable plots and disked under after 90 days. Results from soil samples before and after velvetbean, indicated the sustainable plots had substantially reduced nematode densities, while most conventional plots showed increases. A correlation between location, treatment, root-gall indexes and nematode density occurred in all crops for 1992. In 1993 there was only a correlation between root-gall index and nematode density in pepper. However, root-gall indexes were significant for location and treatment in all crops.