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J.D. Norton, G.E. Boyhan, D.A. Smith, and B.R. Abrahams

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Carlos Miranda, Luis G. Santesteban, and José B. Royo

The influence of the species in spring frost sensibility was determined for the Prunus species peach (P. persica (L.) Batsch), sweet cherry (P. avium L.), almond (P. dulcis (Mill.) Webb/P. amygdalus Batsch), japanese plum (P. salicina Lindl.), and blackthorn (P. spinosa L.). The confidence intervals for lethal temperatures of 10% (LT10) and 90% (LT90) bud injury were also determined. In 2000 and 2001, seven frost treatments were made for each one of the phenological stages comprised between B (first swell) and I (jacket split) in two cultivars per each species. The relationships between frost temperature and the proportion of frost damaged buds for each cultivar, year, and phenological stage were adjusted to linear regression models. The 95% confidence intervals were also calculated. The spring frost hardiness order of the species, from the least to most hardy, was as follows: sweet cherry, almond, peach, japanese plum, and blackthorn. Despite the highly homogeneous nature of the frost and bud characteristics, the temperature range for a given injury degree was quite broad, since the confidence interval's breadth for LT10 was as high as about 3 °C and as high as about 6 °C for LT90. Consequently, when critical temperatures are used in making decisions as to when to begin active frost protection, a prudent measure would be to take the temperature references from the upper limits in the confidence intervals.

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J.D. Norton, G.E. Bovhan, D.A. Smith, and B.R. Abrahams

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J.D. Norton, G.E. Boyhan, D.A. Smith, and B.R. Abrahams

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Weisheng Liu, Dongcheng Liu, Aimin Zhang, Chenjing Feng, Jianmin Yang, Jaeho Yoon, and Shaohua Li

), 2006 ], accounting for 47% of the world production. Plums belong to the genus Prunus . There are two important plum types: European plum ( Prunus domestica , 2n = 6x = 48) and Chinese plum-types, including both pure Chinese plum ( Prunus salicina , 2

Open access

G. Tehrani and D. R. Menzies

Abstract

‘Vanier’ is a good quality, bright red, medium-sized, round, small-pitted, clingstone, Japanese plum (Prunus salicina Lindl.). ‘Vanier’ matures during the last week of August, the same season as ‘Burbank’ and ‘Ozark Premier’. It is introduced primarily for fresh market consumption and for planting in areas where Japanese plums are grown.

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J. M. Thompson and V. E. Prince

Abstract

‘Explorer‘ plum (complex hybrid with reciprocal representations of Prunus salicina Lindl., P. americana Marsh., and P. simonii Carr.) was released by the Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture to provide a large, July-maturing, amberfleshed purple plum adapted to Japanese-type plum-growing areas of the southeastern United States.

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Ahmad Sattar Khan and Zora Singh

The short shelf life of japanese plum ( Prunus salicina Lindl.) and european plum ( Prunus domestica L.) fruit limits its export through sea freight. At 1 °C, japanese plum can be stored for only 3 to 5 weeks ( Navarro et al., 2005 ). Different

Open access

David H. Byrne and Thomas G. Littleton

Abstract

A series of diploid plum (Prunus salicina Lindl. and hybrids), apricot (P. armeniaca L.), and plum × apricot (plumcot) clones were surveyed for six enzyme systems to identify a biochemical marker system for plumcots. Peroxidase (EC 1.11,1.7) was the best marker for identifying plum × apricot hybrids. The other systems contained plum or apricot specific alleles useful in verifying hybrid parentage of first or later generation derivatives.

Open access

J. M. Thompson and V. E. Prince

Abstract

‘Robusto’ plum (a complex diploid plum hybrid composed of Prunus salicina Lindl., P. angustifolia March., P. americana Marsh., P. cerasifera J. F. Ehrh., and P. simonii Carr.) has been released to provide the southeastern United States with a cultivar which extends the early fresh and processing ‘Bruce’ season. ‘Robusto’ is similar to ‘Bruce’ in appearance, better in quality, and matures approximately a week later.