Search Results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 577 items for :

  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Free access

Corey J. Andrikopoulos and James H. Cane

Cultivated red raspberry ( Rubus idaeus L.) is one of the numerous specialty crops dependent upon bees for fruit production ( Klein et al., 2007 ). Although predominantly self-fertile ( Daubeny, 1971 ), raspberry flowers only partially self

Free access

Hugh A. Daubeny and Chaim Kempler

This research was partially funded by the Lower Mainland Horticultural Improvement Association, the B.C. Raspberry Development Council, the B.C. Raspberry Growers Association, and the Washington State Red Raspberry Commission. We gratefully

Free access

Chaim Kempler, Hugh A. Daubeny, Brian Harding, and C. Grant Kowalenko

2 Emeritus research scientist. This research was partially funded by the Raspberry Industry Development Council, Lower Mainland Horticultural Improvement Association and the Washington Red Raspberry Commission. We

Free access

Chaim Kempler, Hugh A. Daubeny, Brian Harding, and Chad E. Finn

1 Research scientist. 2 Research scientist (retired). 3 Research technician. 4 Research geneticist. This research was partially funded by the Raspberry Industry Development Council, Lower Mainland Horticultural Improvement Association, and

Free access

Patrick P. Moore

1 Scientist; e-mail moorepp@wsu.edu . This research was partially funded by the Washington Red Raspberry Commission and the Oregon Raspberry and Blackberry Commission. Washington State University, College of Agricultural, Human and Natural

Free access

M. Joseph Stephens, Peter A. Alspach, Ron A. Beatson, Chris Winefield, and Emily J. Buck

Genetic improvement for fruit yield remains a key breeding objective in raspberry breeding programs worldwide. High-yielding raspberry cultivars with good fruit quality characteristics and pest and disease resistance are most important in

Open access

Rachel E. Rudolph, Lisa W. DeVetter, Chris Benedict, and Inga A. Zasada

Red raspberry is a high-value, economically important crop in northwestern Washington State. In 2017, 9600 acres of red raspberry were harvested in Washington, with a value of more than $52 million ( U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2018 ). The

Free access

Chaim Kempler, Hugh A. Daubeny, Lisa Frey, and Tom Walters

. This research was partially funded by the Raspberry Industry Development Council, Lower Mainland Horticultural Improvement Association and the Washington Red Raspberry Commission. We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of B. Harding, E. Hoey, G. Weeks

Free access

Chaim Kempler, Hugh A. Daubeny, Brian Harding, Tom Baumann, Chad E. Finn, Patrick P. Moore, Mark Sweeney, and Tom Walters

‘Saanich’ ( Fig. 1 ) is a new floricane-fruiting red raspberry ( Rubus idaeus L.) cultivar from the breeding program at the Pacific Agri-Food Research Center (PARC) of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), Agassiz, B.C. ‘Saanich’ produces a

Free access

Yushan Duan, Thomas W. Walters, and Timothy W. Miller

The Pacific Northwest (PNW) region produces most of the North American crop of processed red raspberry ( Rubus idaeus L.) annually, with Washington accounting for 58% of the region’s 45,000 t of fruit produced in 2015 ( Raspberry Industry