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Sarah M. Smith and Zhanao Deng

(1973) showed that C. leavenworthii and C. tinctoria were cross-compatible after hand pollination. Their F 1 hybrids showed reduced pollen stainability when grown in a greenhouse. Meiotic chromosome configuration analyses suggested that the two

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Hirotoshi Tsuda, Hisato Kunitake, Mai Yamasaki, Haruki Komatsu, and Katsunori Yoshioka

compare plant morphological characteristics and pollen stainability of these plants and their parents. Materials and Methods Plant materials. The seeds collected from wild-type shashanbo at Yame city, Fukuoka prefecture, Japan, were sterilized with sodium

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Sarah M. Smith and Zhanao Deng

their F 1 hybrids showed reduced pollen stainability. Smith (1976) indicated the existence of several structural differences, including reciprocal translocations, between the chromosomes of COLE and COTI. Thus, some levels of male and/or female

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David A. Munter, James J. Luby, and Neil O. Anderson

be “fruiting males”) during the March–April period, forcing study from forced cuttings. Fresh pollen from the hermaphroditic group was collected in situ in May 2014. Within 1 h of collection, the pollen was stained with 0.1% aniline blue in 80

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Ryan N. Contreras and Kim Shearer

. Schematic of Galtonia candicans inflorescence. Pollen staining. Flowers were collected from randomly selected M 1 plants (25 control, 26 0.2%, 19 0.4%) in the field for a pollen-staining test as an estimate of viability. Pollen was wet mounted using a

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Junji Amano, Sachiko Kuwayama, Yoko Mizuta, Masaru Nakano, Toshinari Godo, and Hajime Okuno

well as JHS Color Chart number according to Kuwayama et al. (2005a) . Pollen fertility was evaluated by staining pollen grains with 1% (w/v) acetocarmine and described as the percentage of pollen grains with deeply stained cytoplasm ( Nakano and Mii

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Mark K. Ehlenfeldt and James L. Luteyn

composed of 50:50, peat:sand mixture. At approximately a three true-leaf stage, seedlings were transplanted to 36-cell flats. All primary hybrids were transferred to 3-L pots in their second season. Male fertility. Pollen samples were stained with

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Ming Cai, Ke Wang, Le Luo, Hui-tang Pan, Qi-xiang Zhang, and Yu-yong Yang

was estimated in the hybrids and parents by fluorescein diacetate staining. ‘Annabelle’ and ‘Blue Diamond’ had 76.4% and 48.4% stainable pollen, respectively. Stainable pollen ranged from 0% to 76.5% among 14 hybrids ( Table 3 ). In previous studies

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Kelly M. Oates, Thomas G. Ranney, and Darren H. Touchell

evaluate male fertility, pollen was collected from newly opened florets from each plant between 1030 hr and 1130 hr . Pollen was placed on a glass slide and stained with 40 μL of acetic-carmine (1%), covered with a coverslip, and incubated at room

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Josh H. Freeman, Stephen M. Olson, and Eileen A. Kabelka

Seedless watermelons account for 78% of the watermelons sold in the United States ( U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2006 ). Triploid watermelon plants do not produce sufficient viable pollen to pollenize themselves and a diploid cultivar must be