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Open access

RJ Henny

Abstract

Treatment of Peperomia obtusifolia plants with a single foliar spray of N6-Benzyladenine (BA) at 250, 500, or 1000 mg/liter resulted in compact plants with an increased number of lateral branches.

Open access

Dennis P. Stimart

Abstract

Axillary shoot growth on scions of poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima Wild, ex Klotz) was regulated by grafting nonbranching (‘C-1’) and self-branching (‘Amy’, ‘Glory’, ‘Super Rochford’) cultivars on each other. Branching of ‘C-1’ was increased when scions were grafted onto self-branching rootstocks and branching was decreased on self-branching cultivars grafted onto ‘C-1’ rootstocks. Initiation of axillary bud growth was promoted on younger nodes of ‘C-1’ when grafted onto self-branching rootstocks. Increased branching propensity of ‘C-1’ scions grafted onto rootstocks of self-branching types continued even after vegetative cuttings were rooted. Axillary bud activity was unaffected by leaf removal. Results suggest that axillary bud activity is governed by shoot and root interactions of the plant and that axillary shoot growth is governed by some endogenous factors translocated from the roots across the graft union to the shoot.

Open access

Isaac T. Mertz, Nick E. Christians, and Adam W. Thoms

.S. Drummond, M.J. Timmerman, K.L. Dhanani, S. Volpi, E. Rasmussen, B.B. 2010 Excess leucine intake enhances muscle anabolic signaling but not net protein anabolism in young men and women J. Nutr. 140 11 102 106 Harper, A. Miller, R. Block, K. 1984 Branched

Open access

Isaac T. Mertz, Nick E. Christians, and Adam W. Thoms

estimate of organic matter and organic carbon in non-calcareous soils J. Soil Sci. 15 1 833 837 Beard, J.B. 2002 Turf management for golf courses. Ann Arbor Press, Chelsea, MI Blomstrand, E. Eliasson, J. Karlsson, H.R. Köhnke, R. 2006 Branched-chain amino

Open access

D. C. Elfving and C. G. Forshey

Abstract

Vigorous branches of apple (Malus domestica Borkh. cv. Delicious) were headed-back into previous season's growth (1-year-old wood). Increased pruning severity (removal of a greater fraction of 1-year-old wood) resulted in increased shoot growth from 1- and 2-year-old branch segments. Fruitfulness decreased as pruning severity increased. Heading-back altered the distribution of growth between 1- and 2-year-old segments of horizontal and downward-oriented branches but resulted in a total increase in growth only in vertically-oriented branches.

Open access

Sabahudin Hadrović, Filip Jovanović, Sonja Braunović, Saša Eremija, Zoran Miletić, Snežana Stajić, and Igor Golić

others ( Bunbury, 1923 ; Freeman and Peterson, 1941 ). Hence, our study aims to develop a strategy for the selection of woody fruit species based on their capacity for C and N storage. Materials and Methods Biomass samples (branches 10–20 cm long

Open access

Sabahudin Hadrović, Filip Jovanović, Sonja Braunović, Tatjana Ćirković Mitrović, Ljubinko Rakonjac, Mersida Jandrić, and Dina Hadrović

broadleaves based on their C and N storage capacity. Materials and Methods Biomass samples (branches 10–20 cm long, >7 cm thick) of six softwood broadleaves were collected at six geographic points in southwestern Serbia: 1) common alder [ Alnus glutinosa

Free access

Don C. Elfving and Dwayne B. Visser

A new bioregulator, cyclanilide (CYC, Bayer Environmental Science, Montvale, N.J.), was tested for growth-related effects on apple trees over three years. Although treatment with CYC produced small reductions in shoot length, its principal effect was to stimulate the formation of lateral shoots on current-season's shoot growth and from spurs on older wood. CYC treatment of `Scarletspur Delicious' apple trees in the nursery more than doubled the formation of well-developed feathers with wide crotch angles (≈60°) and with no effect on final tree height. CYC appeared to flatten the apples and reduce fruit size in one trial. CYC appears promising for lateral branch induction in apple, especially in the nursery. Chemical names used: 1-(2,4-dichlorophenylaminocarbonyl)-cyclopropane carboxylic acid (Cyclanilide); calcium 3-oxido-4-propionyl-5-oxo-4-propionylcyclohex-3-enecarboxylate (prohexadione-Ca, Apogee); N-(phenylmethyl)-1H-purine-6-amine + gibberellins A4A7 (Promalin); polyoxyethylenepolypropoxypropanol, dihydroxypropane, 2-butoxyethanol (Regulaid).

Free access

Steven A. Weinbaum and T.T. Muraoka

An average of >20% seedless (blank) fruit are produced annually in Pistacia vera cv. Kerman. The degree of blank production was reportedly not related to individual tree yields and, therefore, was not thought to be resource limited (Crane, J.C., 1973. HortSci. 8:388-390). In two crop years, we studied the variability in percentage blanking among individual shoots characterized by widely varying leaf area to fruit (L/F) ratios. L/F ratios were related inversely to the percentage of blank fruit produced. Thus, individual branches behaved somewhat autonomously with respect to blanking. Our data are consistent with the view that embryo development was resource-limited. Although `Kerman' exhibits the potentiality for parthenocarpic fruit set, the hissed distribution of seedless fruit within the tree presumably indicates that blanking is an example of stenospermocarpy. Blanking does not result primarily from inadequate pollination under typical field conditions.

Open access

Stephen M. Southwick, James T. Yeager, and J. Grant

Abstract

The effect of initial heading height on primary branch development in ‘Bing’ sweet cherry (Prunus avium) was examined in the first year of growth. Trees headed 51 cm above the soil surface resulted in fewer primary branches produced by 1-year-old trees than those headed at 75 cm and delay-headed at 142 cm, respectively. Branches on trees with lower heading height had narrow angles and longer branches than those on trees that were headed higher. Trees delay-headed at 142 cm produced the greatest number of primary branches with the widest crotch angles and shortest branch length. Branches were distributed along the entire length of the main leader in each treatment, but more branches with narrow angles and longer lengths were located 50 cm below the heading cut along the tree trunk. A significant linear relationship existed between branch angle and branch length in the 0- to 50-, 50- to 100-, and 100- to 142-cm sections along the tree trunk.